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OP mentioned he has weak wrists so a breaker bar would most certainly help him with leverage even at 29 ft pounds.
What about his legs? I agree that a breaker bar would help him loosen it. Lets hope he doesn't use it to tighten it. Seriously though I have used every part of my body at one time or another to break bolt loose.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I agree, most vehicles don't give you the little built in "funnel" to channel the old oil. I have never spilled more than a few tablespoons when taking the filter off (that didn't run right into the pan).



Breaker bar? The spec for the drain bolt is 29 ft/lbs, so a torque wrench would come in handy. I use a torque wrench on mine but if I didn't have one I would hand tighten until snug and then 1/8th of a turn more. When I'm working with other guys in the garage that like to over tighten stuff I always remind them that its a car, not a tractor or a bulldozer.


To the OP. Awesome job doing this yourself and taking the time to make a write up to help others. You asked for advice so here is mine.
  • Use a 6 point socket on the hex head bolt (hex = 6). Using the right tool will prevent damage. You did the right thing by swapping to a tool that used the entire bolt head to loosen/tighten. The closed end of the wrench would have worked fine.
  • When installing the new filter prime the filter once with fresh oil. By this I mean pour new oil into the filter up to the top and let it soak into the filter media. This prevents a dry start when the oil first circulates. It also give you the opportunity to dip your clean finger into the fresh oil and rub it around the seal on the new filter. By doing this it will make future filter removal much easier.
  • Don't waste your money on those expensive blue towels. Use old jeans cut up into rags or get good wills throw aways and cut up for rags.
  • Keep at it. The only way to learn is to DO.
Thank you for your advice! Yes I did rub some new oil around the oil filter seal, but filling the oil filter itself first was something I did not consider

My old rags are currently used to clean my toilet hehe
 

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Don't worry about pre-filling the oil filter. Oil filters on passenger cars have a TINY volume and the engine pumps a large volume of oil in a short period. They fill with oil very quickly and the actual run time with no oil pressure is probably equivalent to a hand full of cold starts if even that. In fact my Tacoma has the threaded end of the filter pointing down to the ground so if you pre filled that you would just pour oil all over the place while screwing it down. Toyota did this by design knowing that nobody could successfully prefill that filter. Just don't rev the engine above idle until you've given plenty of time for oil pressure to come up.

Here is some food for thought. I have a friend who drives for a living. He has 300,000 miles on his G35 and that engine still runs fantastic with no smoke at all, good compression, and pulls as good as new. Not only did he never pre fill his oil filter he did something incredibly stupid one time. Back when the car had about 100K on it he decided to drive the car up his driveway and into his garage about 15-20 feet so he could pour the new oil in under the shade since it was hot out that day. He drained the oil and replaced the filter out on his driveway to avoid spilling oil in his garage. He is not a car guy and didn't think twice about it at that moment. So the car was started, put in drive, and driven up the driveway and parked with no measurable oil in the pan and certainly not enough to cover the oil pickup to feed the pump and generate any oil pressure.

After he did this though he did have some second thoughts about why it might be a bad idea and he called me, knowing I was a car guy who had built cars in the past, to see if he might have done damage to his engine. I told him I honestly wasn't sure.

You see when you start a car in park or neutral there is almost no load on the crank shaft and pistons/rods which means the bearings supporting those assemblies (rod bearings, crank journals, etc) are seeing minimal forces, just the forces to keep the whole assembly moving which are tiny compared those the bearings see under load. The residual oil film is plenty to protect these bearing surfaces during starting but under load they are supposed to see positive oil pressure that keeps the oil film in tact during high forces on the bearings.

By putting the car in drive and loading up the torque converter (automatic car) and then giving it some throttle to make its way up a driveway there is some increased loads being put on these bearings. Not nearly as much as while driving and accelerating but substantially more than just idling with no load in neutral. I was concerned about a possible film break up leading to metal on metal contact which would scar bearing surfaces that are always supposed to be mirror smooth. Scarring these surfaces leads to bearing failure which won't be noticeable right away but would eventually toast the engine. I was pretty sure he was okay but not 100% sure.

Anyway, despite this dumb scenario it doesn't appear he did any damage as the engine now has 300K and it still runs great.

BTW I personally don't like to use funnels for the oil fill unless the filler neck is in a bad spot/angle. Sure the funnel is the guaranteed way to prevent spilling any oil but I hate having any oily funnel to keep clean. If you have a good smooth wrist action and some practice you can get a clean stream into hole from the initial pour to the finish even with a 5 quart jug. If I do spill its usually a tiny bit on the initial pour out which I can quickly wipe up before it migrates anywhere. Just takes some practice.
 

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Very nice write up. To make your next oil change easier, you might want to consider getting a Fumoto valve (F-106) and adapter.
 

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Nice write-up, thank you for doing this for the forum.

Thank you for mentioning that places take used oil for free.

I just wanted to echo what was said before to new people reading this: a torque wrench is an invaluable tool. Harbor Freight Tools sell them (on sale) for $10 - $14. That's it! Until you get an idea of the "tightness" of what your oil drain plug, spark plugs, transmission oil, and brake calipers require, you should use a torque wrench. After you "understand it", you can go by experienced feel.

But there are many stories here of newbies over-tightening things to the point that they strip.

Good work!
 

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Thanks for your contributions! Great to see people learning and sharing. +1 on Fumoto valve.
 

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Awesome write up! Really great! :wink

I've also never seen the Fumoto Valve, seen the reviews, all look great on it. I could see a problem only if the drain plug faced directly down and having it's threads protrude into the the oil pan not making all the oil to drain out. I'm def gonna have to pick up one for my V6 Accord and Harley, will save me time and no clean up to deal with. Thanks for the mention on this product guys!
 

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I have a 2017 Honda Accord sport! I was wondering was size socket wrench do I need to change the oil! Please help! I think 17mm but I don’t know for sure!
 
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