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I was wondering if there are any benfits to getting drilled/slotted brake rotors, also ive searched and found that Akebono ProAct seems to be the best pad to get, do you have to get a special pad for drilled/slotted brake rotors.
 

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I was wondering if there are any benfits to getting drilled/slotted break rotors
Drilled/slotted rotors are designed to give you better cooling which translates into less brake fade and better stopping.

Benefit of drilled rotors is lighter weight and better stopping during wet weather.

Downside to drilled/slotted rotors is that brake pads tend to wear out faster... it varies with different pads. Basically, when the brake pads rub against the holes and slots, they act like a cheese grater.

However, a benefit of the "cheese grater" effect is that the pads won't become glazed... that is the pads won't overheat causing the surface material to crystallize, resulting in poor stopping performance, vibrations, etc. since a fresh braking surface is constantly being exposed.

A downside of drilled rotors from what I've heard is that they're prone to cracking. Slotted rotors don't have that problem.

do you have to get a special pad for drilled/slotted break rotors.
No. But if you buy el cheapo pads, chances are they'll wear out faster with drilled/slotted rotors compared to ceramic pads, for example. The el cheapo pads won't be able to resist high temperatures as well either, thus poorer stopping (brake fade).


I'm probably missing some stuff, but those are the main points I'm aware of.
 

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I'll jump in here with some qualifications.

namegoeshere's benefits are claimed for drilled and slotted rotors, and of those, I think the biggest potential is improved wet weather stopping since said slots and holes should channel water from the rotor surface more readily.

OTOH, if the rotors are hotter because they aren't slotted or drilled, shouldn't they flash off water as steam more effectively?

Further, if you think about how slots and holes could improve heat transfer, they really don't offer nearly as much as a standard vented rotor. Most heat transfer IMHO would occur through radiation and not convection through improved airflow.

As an added consideration, aircraft brakes are also called "heatsinks" because they have to suck up the enormous amount of frictional heat generated by stopping a multiton projectile going as fast as 200 mph. The idea is to be able to release enough heat to retain frictional properties (i.e., avoid fade) while simultaneously ABSORBING enough heat to prevent the local area from heating sufficiently to boil fluids, rupture brake lines and ignite the fluids, and/or blow the tires (which is perhaps the major reason aircraft tires use nitrogen and not air).

I suggest you dig up the July issue of Car and Driver in which they test a bunch of cars, including the G8 Accord, for fade resistance under conditions most of us would never encounter. Their conclusion was that modern stock braking systems are plenty good for any but the most aggressive drivers, and even then, they are probably on the track and not the roads.

A seldom observed fact is that the stopping distance of virtually every vehicle on the road today is limited not by the "power" of the brakes but rather by the adhesive limit of tire to pavement. Once that adhesive limit is reached, skidding starts and ABS kicks in. If you really want to stop faster, get grippier tires. Higher end and/or aggressive pads may help with fade resistance (but you might get poorer cold friction in the trade -an exception to the "tires limit stopping" claim above). Slotting and drilling rotors IMHO are about 95% for show, and the rest for stop under very specific conditions.

I have ProACTs on a '99 with standard Brembo OEM replacement rotors and like them very much
 

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a mouthful but i feel like i learned something, thanks :thmsup:

I'll jump in here with some qualifications.

namegoeshere's benefits are claimed for drilled and slotted rotors, and of those, I think the biggest potential is improved wet weather stopping since said slots and holes should channel water from the rotor surface more readily.

OTOH, if the rotors are hotter because they aren't slotted or drilled, shouldn't they flash off water as steam more effectively?

Further, if you think about how slots and holes could improve heat transfer, they really don't offer nearly as much as a standard vented rotor. Most heat transfer IMHO would occur through radiation and not convection through improved airflow.

As an added consideration, aircraft brakes are also called "heatsinks" because they have to suck up the enormous amount of frictional heat generated by stopping a multiton projectile going as fast as 200 mph. The idea is to be able to release enough heat to retain frictional properties (i.e., avoid fade) while simultaneously ABSORBING enough heat to prevent the local area from heating sufficiently to boil fluids, rupture brake lines and ignite the fluids, and/or blow the tires (which is perhaps the major reason aircraft tires use nitrogen and not air).

I suggest you dig up the July issue of Car and Driver in which they test a bunch of cars, including the G8 Accord, for fade resistance under conditions most of us would never encounter. Their conclusion was that modern stock braking systems are plenty good for any but the most aggressive drivers, and even then, they are probably on the track and not the roads.

A seldom observed fact is that the stopping distance of virtually every vehicle on the road today is limited not by the "power" of the brakes but rather by the adhesive limit of tire to pavement. Once that adhesive limit is reached, skidding starts and ABS kicks in. If you really want to stop faster, get grippier tires. Higher end and/or aggressive pads may help with fade resistance (but you might get poorer cold friction in the trade -an exception to the "tires limit stopping" claim above). Slotting and drilling rotors IMHO are about 95% for show, and the rest for stop under very specific conditions.

I have ProACTs on a '99 with standard Brembo OEM replacement rotors and like them very much
 

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A seldom observed fact is that the stopping distance of virtually every vehicle on the road today is limited not by the "power" of the brakes but rather by the adhesive limit of tire to pavement.
I really wish that were the case with my '88 K5 Blazer! I can sink the brake pedal to the floor and the tires just keep spinning. :lmao:

-Wes
 

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The Akebono ProACT pads are good, I've used them on a '01 TL before with good results. However there are pads that work just as well for less money. The new Raybestos Advanced Technology pads use a NRS backing plate and their rubber coated "floating" shims. This design is far superior to the design used by Akebono. I've used the Raybestos pads before on a Corolla with good results. NAPA's Adaptive One pads also use the same NRS design and worked well on my Saturn.

If you are an aggressive driver, the Hawk HPS pads are a better choice than any of the aforementioned pads. The Hawks also use the NRS backing plate and shims, but their compound has greater fade resistance and better braking performance. The trade-off is a slightly higher purchase price and some occasional squealing.

I personally prefer plain rotors over drilled and/or slotted ones. As mentioned earlier, the drilled and slotted rotors do eat through pads more quickly. Sure, their "grating" effect may eliminate pad glazing, but if your driving conditions are severe, you should upgrade to a pad that is resistant to glazing in the first place, such as Hawk HPS. Also, drilled and slotted rotors tend to increase the potential for brake noise. I like the Centric Premium or Raybestos Advanced Technology rotors myself.
 

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The Akebono ProACT pads are good, I've used them on a '01 TL before with good results. However there are pads that work just as well for less money. The new Raybestos Advanced Technology pads use a NRS backing plate and their rubber coated "floating" shims. This design is far superior to the design used by Akebono. I've used the Raybestos pads before on a Corolla with good results. NAPA's Adaptive One pads also use the same NRS design and worked well on my Saturn.

If you are an aggressive driver, the Hawk HPS pads are a better choice than any of the aforementioned pads. The Hawks also use the NRS backing plate and shims, but their compound has greater fade resistance and better braking performance. The trade-off is a slightly higher purchase price and some occasional squealing.

I personally prefer plain rotors over drilled and/or slotted ones. As mentioned earlier, the drilled and slotted rotors do eat through pads more quickly. Sure, their "grating" effect may eliminate pad glazing, but if your driving conditions are severe, you should upgrade to a pad that is resistant to glazing in the first place, such as Hawk HPS. Also, drilled and slotted rotors tend to increase the potential for brake noise. I like the Centric Premium or Raybestos Advanced Technology rotors myself.
Is the Rabestos Advanced Technology rotors non glazed? Do the pads come with a 45 degree angle?
 

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I was wondering if there are any benfits to getting drilled/slotted brake rotors, also ive searched and found that Akebono ProAct seems to be the best pad to get, do you have to get a special pad for drilled/slotted brake rotors.
I'm just wondering why you need/want drilled/slotted rotors.

If you plan on doing some pretty rough driving and will need to do a lot of hard braking, I could see the need for them. Maybe.

Of course, another perfectly acceptable reason is that you have the money and just want to get them :D
Maybe going for aesthetics.

I went with the Centric Premium rotors and EBC Green Stuff brakes. I found the combination to be fairly inexpensive (especially since I installed them myself) and they work very well. After 1,500+ miles on them, I have no complaints and from the reviews I read, I don't expect any.

If you need better stopping power for highly spirited driving, you might look into the EBC Red Stuff or maybe the Yellow Stuff http://www.ebcbrakes.com/ Check out their break pad selector section for an idea of what sort of brakes to look at getting based on application and driving style: http://www.ebcbrakes.com/selector.shtml
 

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I've always used slotted fronts -- supposedly allows the gasses out faster. I'm sure as a daily commuter there's no reason to get them though
 

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I'll probably get flamed but I'm going to be different and say that I actually like the OE pads. I've been surprised at how well they perform for daily driving. I'm still on the fence on the OE rotors because while they haven't given me any issues, I know that from past experiences that OE rotors usually don't fare too well.
My usual rotor/pad combo is PBR/Axxis pads and brembo blank rotors for daily driving. I'm not a street racer
 

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I'll probably get flamed but I'm going to be different and say that I actually like the OE pads. I've been surprised at how well they perform for daily driving. I'm still on the fence on the OE rotors because while they haven't given me any issues, I know that from past experiences that OE rotors usually don't fare too well.
My usual rotor/pad combo is PBR/Axxis pads and brembo blank rotors for daily driving. I'm not a street racer
I doubt you'll get flamed, but I'm surprised too from all I've read on the subject.


How many miles do you have on your OE pads and rotors?
 

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I've said this elsewhere here, but there are two schools of thought on OE brake components.

School A says Honda spent million$ to optimize the brakes for performance, wear, dust, NVH, and cost. Tap into that work and stay with OEM.

School B says Honda optimized the rotors according to their view of the world (cost probably being a major player), and if you value some things differently, then go aftermarket to capture what matters to you.

And drilled/slotted rotors? I made ceramic composite brake rotors for a while; if I told you the two companies whose reps said this, you'd recognize them and I'd be sued, but if you had to drill over one hundred holes through every one inch thick reinforced silicon carbide rotor, you'd want to know why too. So I asked, and the answer was the same - aesthetics. They look cool. In theory they have some benefits at the margin, but probably only a handful of forum members would ever need those benefits, and I hope they're on the track when they do need them.
 

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I've said this elsewhere here, but there are two schools of thought on OE brake components.

School A says Honda spent million$ to optimize the brakes for performance, wear, dust, NVH, and cost. Tap into that work and stay with OEM.
I clean my wheels every three days because of the heavy dust left by the stock pads.

I am thinking of junking the OE pads in favor of Akebono's,Adaptive One, or some other low dust pad because,quite frankly, the OE pads are pissing me off.

So no,Honda did not optimize OE pads for brake dust. Everything else is fine. I have 69K miles on the car and front pads look good for another 25-30K miles.
 

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I've always used slotted fronts -- supposedly allows the gasses out faster. I'm sure as a daily commuter there's no reason to get them though
How long have you been driving in 1978? :naughty:
 

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I clean my wheels every three days because of the heavy dust left by the stock pads.

I am thinking of junking the OE pads in favor of Akebono's,Adaptive One, or some other low dust pad because,quite frankly, the OE pads are pissing me off.

So no,Honda did not optimize OE pads for brake dust. Everything else is fine. I have 69K miles on the car and front pads look good for another 25-30K miles.
My issue is that my Axxis Ultimates gave me dust issues which i had already known about but figured it was worth it over the better performance. My 2007 Accord OEM pads have not given me any dust issues at all. But then again, I am not too particular about keeping my car in showroom condition and can go for months before washing.
 
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