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Discussion Starter #81
I have never had a brake hardware shift. You need to make sure the small ears/flaps that anchor them in the caliper bracket are bent out so they sit against the brake caliper tightly when you push them into the caliper bracket. For the middle section of the brake hardware, you need to push it down using a flat head screwdriver or it will scrape on the rotor and make a very loud screeching sound. Been there and experienced it.
 

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I have never had a brake hardware shift. You need to make sure the small ears/flaps that anchor them in the caliper bracket are bent out so they sit against the brake caliper tightly when you push them into the caliper bracket. For the middle section of the brake hardware, you need to push it down using a flat head screwdriver or it will scrape on the rotor and make a very loud screeching sound. Been there and experienced it.
Could be that one of the tabs somewhere wasn't all the way down and wrapping around its hold spot on the caliper. I know what you're saying. I'll keep listening for it and check it again next time I rotate the tires (assuming I don't hear something before then, hopefully not)
 

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Discussion Starter #83
I've actually had this happen once on my old 98 V6, of course back when I was very young, but then I did not understand what the brakes were doing. If the hardware isn't sitting the bracket tightly, it will lift from heat expansion after you brake hard then you'll get the screeching sound.
 

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ANYBODY who has a question about why rear caliper pistons are stuck or abnormal wear need to read this. If you are too lazy to do what I do or don't care then you will continue to experience caliper/brake component issues. Any shop will not go into detail like this because brake issues are GOOD money for them.

I am posting this to clear some misconceptions and wrong-doings I have seen people do over the years, when performing a brake job / rotors / pads install. I learned this myself over the past 8 years, after numerous brake instructional videos and self-done brake jobs right and wrong. I have found this to be the most reliable way to service brakes and have them last a long while no matter how hard you drive. It may or may not apply to you or you might just think I'm flat out wrong. This is what has worked for me. I don't experience abnormal pad, abnormal rotor wear or pulsation, nor do I ever have a stuck caliper piston EVER, since I learned the proper way of doing this. My rotors don't WARP, in fact they don't ever warp. And I don't resurface rotors, ever, there is no point taking away heat dissipating material. They are cheap enough these days to buy new. I use only Centric high carbon rotors and semi-aggressive Hawk pads. All tools are lifetime use. The only thing I ever buy are the new pads, and new rotors. This is why I recommend people doing brake job themselves, the right way with 1 time tool investment.

- First the tools, I do have some unusual items:
* I use dental floss to lubricate between the piston boot and the piston before I turn the piston back in so the boot does not get twisted. It is plastic, soft and safe, does not cause boot damage.
* I use fluid film to coat the hub's surface before the mount the new rotors to prevent rust from building

- then the tips during the process: ( I won't go into details of removing bolts)
* I remove the two 12mm bolts that affix the brake line to the knuckle and e-brake cable to allow flex room for the caliper.
* I lubricate between the boot and the piston using CRC brake grease and a dental floss.
* I place a light coat of CRC brake grease on the caliper piston boot, this prevents rust build-up flakes/crap/environment junk from directly sticking on the boot. Junk is sticking on the film of grease instead. Do not use a ton of grease here, because you'll get a lot of dirt stuck to the boot.
* I turn the piston back in, with the brake fluid reservoir's cap open, using a piston rewind tool, instead of a cube tool or screwdriver. I highly recommend this, as it prevents slippage like using a screwdriver or the cube tool. You can get a set for just $20 on Amazon. You can open the bleeder screw so old fluid does not push backwards, however, this depends on the bleeder screws' condition.
* I grind off rust build-up on the caliper bracket's slots and lube there, using a flat file and CRC brake grease. You can see clearly the rust that came off, on the newspaper. This is a CRITICAL step. Getting rust off that surface allows the clearance for the pad back to the original spec. This prevents the pads from getting pinched in the caliper bracket.
* I do not lube the brake hardware
* I always use the screws that affix the rotor to the hub. I do use a ton of anti-seize, they always come off easily. I do not like my rotors flopping around before the caliper is mounted back on. This potentially causes misalignment.
* I clean off the new rotors' surface using CRC brake clean, because there is a film of oil from the factory to prevent rust.
* I grind off rust layer on the hub's surface using a dremel with brush then spray a layer of fluid film on it to prevent rust build-up. If you are lazy and do not clean the layer of rust off the hub's surface, the rotors then do not sit flat on the hub's surface. This is the most common reason for new rotors wobbling.
* I pull out and clean off the caliper slider pins and lube with only 3M silicone paste.
* I place a circle film of Hawk gearhead grease where the inside pad contacts the caliper piston. I do not smear it all over, smearing too much here only attracts dirt.
* I smear the same Hawk gearhead grease on the inside surface of the caliper's 2 forks, instead of on the outside pad's surface. This prevents over-smear as oppose to if you do this on the outside pad's surface
* I use CRC 3-36 multipurpose lubricant and lubricate the e-brake's mechanism and spring
* I roughly clean up the caliper's surface and use flat black BBQ paint and paint over the rusty areas using a small brush. This paint costs only $8 a can at Home Depot and greatly reduces the amount of rust build-up on caliper. I touch up during each service

** I do the above every 6 months, before and after winter.
Can you recommend a brake hardware kit that doesn't contain metal?
 

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Discussion Starter #86
They are all metal, but you need stainless steel ones. When you don't lube the brake caliper bracket slots, rust builds up there, and it'll stain a layer onto the bottom of the brake hardware anyway. The problem is the brake caliper bracket rusting because it is a piece of cast iron.
 

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They are all metal, but you need stainless steel ones. When you don't lube the brake caliper bracket slots, rust builds up there, and it'll stain a layer onto the bottom of the brake hardware anyway. The problem is the brake caliper bracket rusting because it is a piece of cast iron.
Sorry I meant Stainless steel. Which brand would u recommend? Im looking at RockAuto, they got carlson, BA, ac delco, centrics but none says stainless steel.
 

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FYI, according to the Honda service manual for the Accord, bleeding brakes goes in this order, 1st. Front Left, 2nd. Front Right, 3rd Rear Right, 4th, Rear Left.
So if you are doing just front or rear brakes, you might want to do the side first according to the bleeding order. I have no idea if it really matters, but I don't think you would go wrong following the Honda service manual with that.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
You aren't going to find if the brake hardware is stainless steel or not until you get a magnet close to them in person. I know that the OEM ones are stainless steel for sure.
 

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They are all metal, but you need stainless steel ones. When you don't lube the brake caliper bracket slots, rust builds up there, and it'll stain a layer onto the bottom of the brake hardware anyway. The problem is the brake caliper bracket rusting because it is a piece of cast iron.
T-rd Are you still recommending the Weaver brand at Advance Auto as you mentioned here post #5 https://www.driveaccord.net/forums/178-wheels-suspension-brakes/464881-2006-accord-brakes.html


https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/wearever-disc-brake-hardware-kit-13409/10168182-P?searchTerm=brake+hardware
 

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Make sure to check the inside surface of the brake rotors when you're doing a service.

Had to change my front rotors due to vibration. Reason being that I didn't check the inside surface during the service 6 months ago. Had I done that, I probably would have seen that they were wearing strangely.

The retaining screws were also pretty stubborn. I knew this was going to be a problem so I got replacements at the dealer and an impact driver beforehand. They were so stubborn that they broke the impact driver bit.

But drilling them out is easy. Use a 1/4" bit to drill the head off, then drill an 1/8" pilot hole in the center and use a screw extractor. They seize between the screw head and rotor, so once the head is drilled off, backing them out with the extractor is very easy.

I have a bulk set of drill bits for the garage. They're cheap and very useful. It's great to be able to grab a new, sharp one if the one you're using dulls or breaks. For example, I used 2 of each size to get these 4 screws out.
 

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....

The retaining screws were also pretty stubborn. I knew this was going to be a problem so I got replacements at the dealer and an impact driver beforehand. They were so stubborn that they broke the impact driver bit.

But drilling them out is easy. Use a 1/4" bit to drill the head off, then drill an 1/8" pilot hole in the center and use a screw extractor. They seize between the screw head and rotor, so once the head is drilled off, backing them out with the extractor is very easy.
....
For example, I used 2 of each size to get these 4 screws out.
Which kind of screw extractor did you use? Spiral, straight, or spline?

Speaking of "stubborn", :grin, you already realized that they wouldn't come out but still kept beating on that impact driver.

When I did my rear brake rotors, all 4 screws were seized. I just drilled the heads off and left the stud in there. It seems a rust belt thing, however, the 4 screws on the front rotors could be easily removed with just regular screw driver.

Cobalt bits may last longer. Happy new year!
 

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This style. I suppose they would be spiral?



As for breaking the bit, I don't really know what to say. Chalk that up to my inexperience using an impact driver. I should also clarify, it managed to get the first of four screws out after a few whacks, but the bit broke after a few whacks on the second screw.

It was my brother's MAC unit. He was there with me, so I don't think that he thought the bit would break either. He probably would have stopped me otherwise. It's covered by warranty though, so no worries there.
 

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Discussion Starter #97
Your best friend in taking out the rotor screws is a set of JIS screwdriver. Once you take them out, you can put them back in, but clear the rust off first then put back on with lots of anti-seize, and you'll never have the same problem again. I have broken impact driver bits, twice, while using a Husky and some brand I don't remember. But that was on a 2003 TL's rear rotor that's never been replaced for 15 years.

If back of the rotor isn't wearing properly, then it still has something to do with slider pins and rust below the brake hardware, given that the piston isn't seized in the bore.
 

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I was going to buy a set of JIS impact bits from Vessel, but after watching Eric O remove some Honda rotor screws using what I assume is a standard Phillips bit (since he didn't mention JIS), I thought I would be fine doing the same. Maybe not.

And I agree about the backside wear. I have a feeling that was due to the previous owner's "neglect". I was looking through the service records, and those brakes were put on in 2012. I don't think they were ever serviced until I got the car in 2016. The pads were just about seized in the brackets when I did the brake service. However, all of the sliders were still moving and the pistons did retract pretty easily. I'll take a look at the rotors when I take off the winter tires in the spring just to be sure things are wearing evenly.

 

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....If back of the rotor isn't wearing properly, then it still has something to do with slider pins and rust below the brake hardware, given that the piston isn't seized in the bore.
Salt and location might have played a bigger role.

When I cleaned the brakes last summer, the back side of all 4 rotors had substantial amount of rust near the edge, which caused more wear on the pads at that position. I knocked most the rust off with a screw driver and hammer. That's a lot! The outer side of the rotors looked normal, and the brake hardware and slide pins were near perfect.
 
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