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Discussion Starter #1
Hey there. New member, just joined. I have a 95 Accord LX and the fuel lines are completely rusted. So I'm looking for any general advice others have had doing this job. I'm committed to replacing the fuel lines and rear brake lines because they are shot. Very rusty. I have the gas tank out already and am working on getting the lines out from the plastic 'tray' that runs along the under side of the car. Have not removed the fuel filter yet. One question I had was what type of line to use. I'm figuring on buying a roll of 3/8 and a roll of 1/4 and having a go at it. Anyone done this?

Thanks!
Jim
 

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Jim,

Welcome to Drive Accord. I do not want to insult you here, as you seem to know your way around cars....but are you sure the fuel and brake lines rusted through? Or is it just surface rust?

If the car spent its winter life in "road salt" Chicago, I could see that....

I don't know the size of lines of the 1995...perhaps the parts guys at your local Honda dealer could tell you? Or you can search the website of Majestic Honda. Lots of parts diagrams.

I will bet that fuel line sizes were standardized across most car manufacturers during the 1980s....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Rick,

YES they are rusted! I live in Northeast Ohio and they use salt like it's free. Two of the lines were leaking and I touched them and they basically fell apart. The car only has 125k miles on it so I think it's probably worth keeping and the rest of it is not too bad. This is just a really crappy job :(
Jim

Oh, and I did see the Majestic website - very helpful
 

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Tackle it, Jim!

Replacing rusted brake lines and fuel lines is not difficult, just take your time. If you are bending the lines to fit the structural support, you have to get them pretty close to the original bends.

The difficult part is the connections. You will most likely need a dedicated flare wrench. I would also see if you can soak the connections in PB Blaster for a few days prior- just to minimize sheared fittings.

Brake master cylinder: When you have drained the brake lines, do NOT step on the brake pedal. If you do, the brake master cylinder piston will go past its normal level in a split second and destroy the seal. Hence- you will need a new brake master cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good to know about the master cylinder - thanks. Yeah, it's too late to stop now! Went to AZ last night and bought roll of 3/16 and 1/4 copper line and some 5/16 lines.. ugh $$$. I have a flare tool. Got the first rear line in. Doing more tonight... :drink:
 

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What type of unions did u use? There are inverted flare unions and unions that dont say inverted but it looks like it has a much smaller flare than the one that says inverted .

Also what type of tube nuts? Inverted flare nuts or tube nuts that dont say inverted flare?

Im guessing u need inverted flare fittings when using line that you'll flare.
 
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