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Discussion Starter #1
hello all ,its been a while since i posted here, i have a 09 accord coupe v6 auto , i called the dealership and they want around 380 dollars for the back rotors, and about 350 for the front , i looked up duralast golds and there alot cheaper,

what should i get? does anyone have any recommondations?
the stock honda rotors lasted me 90,000 miles! should i pay the big bucks for the stock honda rotors from honda?

please , someone give me some feedback
 

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RacerRik
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There is no benefit in going with OEM parts for the rotors. Duralast golds will be just as good. This advice comes from someone who uses OEM parts for nearly everything. For example, I would suggest sticking with OEM pads.

Let me also ask why do you need new rotors? Did you let the pads get worn down to bare metal? Shops always want to either turn or replace rotors for every brake job. It just is not necessary. I have put 5 sets of OEM pads on out 2003 Odyssey. Same original rotors. Never turned them either. Just pop out the old pads and pop in the new pads. Works great!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
when i turn the wheel while driving slow it makes clunky noises, the top of the rotor is protruding a bit too , and they look horrible

so duralast rotors arent bad/?
 

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RacerRik wrote:

Let me also ask why do you need new rotors? Did you let the pads get worn down to bare metal? Shops always want to either turn or replace rotors for every brake job. It just is not necessary. I have put 5 sets of OEM pads on out 2003 Odyssey. Same original rotors. Never turned them either. Just pop out the old pads and pop in the new pads. Works great!
If you are replacing the pads with a new version of the same pad, you can do what RacerRik says. If you are going to different pads, then I would at a minimum turn the rotors or replace them with new ones. That's because disc brakes work because of a third body friction film formed on the rotor surface. Because every brand/type pad composition is different, so too is the friction film. The film from the old rotors might play nicely with that from the new ones - but it might not. IMHO better safe than sorry - start with a fresh rotor surface.

You've got friction going one here - two surfaces rubbing against each other - both will wear, but one (pad) should wear faster than the other (rotor). Unless you get those "lifetime" pads, which oftentimes are made so hard they wear down the rotor. In that case the shop makes money by selling and installing new rotors, not new pads.

Other things to consider:

1) If you have pulsation when you apply the brakes - the term is judder, but many blame it on "warped rotors" (which doesn't happen) the root cause is variation in the metal structure across the rotor surface likely caused by one spot getting a lot more heat history than everyplace else. Turning the rotor will remove the high spot causing the judder, but only for a while. The metal structure variation is still there, so the judder will return, usually within 10,000 miles.

2) There are minimum thickness specs for a rotor, below which a reputable shop will not turn it. If you want to reuse yours, you should mic them and replace them if they are too thin.

3) Look at the swept area of both sides of the rotor - are they clean and shiny, or is there some rust and "record grooving"? If the latter, you should strongly consider turning/replacing.
 

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To answer your "which rotors should I get?" question -

  1. there are many reputable brands - Duralast is one, as are many other house brands - NAPA, ProStop, etc.
  2. A little higher up the food chain, we have Centric (which I have seen get the fewest negative reviews in this forum), StopTech, and my favorite, Brembo. Some of these guys probably made some of the house brands I just mentioned. These are more expensive, but prices vary widely. I just replaced pads and rotors, and Amazon's prices were up to 50% less than local stores or other places like TireRack or Rock Auto.
  3. Realistically there is little difference among the big names if you stick to them. Nearly all are made in China, and so are the cheapo eBay junque rotors - stay away from them.
  4. Stay with a solid rotor for long life. Drilled and slotted rotors look cool, but are noisier, wear pads faster due to the "cheese grater" effect, and provide no real benefit to daily drivers in 99.999%+ of real world street situations. Of course, they look cool, which may make them worth it for you overall.
 

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RacerRik
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I agree with everything Reframmellator just wrote except.... don't ever get your rotors turned. If the rotor surface is not good, just buy new ones. My reasons are several.

1st - turned rotors are not smooth. They have a fine groove left in them from the cutting bit. That groove will wear down your new pads quickly until the pads eventually smooth out the surface of the rotor. By then you probably have chewed up a third of your pad life. New rotors are ground not turned and thus have a nice friction surface which does not chew up your pads. I have also seen this groove act just like a record and your pads are the needle - the pads get pulled in by the groove and bind up in the caliper thus making braking inconsistent, especially if one side binds up and the other does not.

2nd - turned rotors are now thinner than new rotors. This means they cannot handle heat as well and are more prone to warp or crack.

3rd - turned rotors tend to have significant runout which can cause vibration and chatter especially when braking from highway speeds.

4th - rotors like the Duralast are good quality and just not expensive enough to waste time and take chances on turned rotors.
 

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$380 for rotors....Outrageous.

I got a whole set of Rotors Hardware and Ceramic brake pads for just over $300.......

THATS ALL FOUR WHEELS.
 

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Did they want those prices for just the materials or was that a materials+installation cost?

I just replaced all 4 corners' rotors and pads for $200. Did the install myself, so I saved a good chunk of change there.
 

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that is why we call them STEALER-SHIPS.

when it comes to tranny, electrical, etc. I will pay for it as they are the experts. BUT for Rotors, pads and other perishable items....much cheaper to DIY.

besides it gives us valuable bonding time with our cars.
 
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I just finished putting pads and rotors on my 08 coupe. Compared to many other automotive parts/jobs, buying new pads & rotors and putting them on your car is relatively cheap and easy.

I'm in the camp that goes for drilled/slotted... for the looks!
 

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I agree with everything Reframmellator just wrote except.... don't ever get your rotors turned. If the rotor surface is not good, just buy new ones. My reasons are several.

3rd - turned rotors tend to have significant runout which can cause vibration and chatter especially when braking from highway speeds.
For the record (so to speak) I don't have my rotors turned either. Some may choose to do so for cost reasons. This is a good point, and is why purists who DO turn their rotors turn them while on the vehicle.
 

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what rotors should i get? do duralasts last 100,000 miles like my stocks did?
Duralasts may not last 100k depending on how heavy your foot is. But they do warranty the pads for life. When they're shot, remove the pads, but them in the original box, bring back to Autozone and they'll give you a brand new pair.

I would try the Duralast ceramic first. Use good quality rotors. Bed in the brakes. Google it.

If you were in FL, I'd be happy to give you a hand. It ain't rocket science and you'll be proud once finished that you didn't spend $400 at the dealer for an afternoons work.
 

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RacerRik
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Go ahead and get the Duralast rotors. Yes, they should last as long as the OEM ones. But the OEM ones should have lasted longer than 100K miles as long as you change the pads before metal hits metal.
 
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