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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I just bought the car yesterday. Honestly didn't think to check the oil at the time. It only has 40,000 mile and the oil was changed regularly according to carfax. The rust is mostly in the mid section of the dipstick. I don't see any signs of flood damage and there's no milky stuff in the oil cap.

Not sure what to think. I'd appreciate any help or advice

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· Elvira
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what year and engine? Looks like the 2.4l

The I4 dipstick looks like this OEM....


I'm gonna guess here but that does not look like the OEM dipstick that would be on a 2.4l 2013-2017 9th gen.

Another WAG that if it isn't the OEM that came with the engine it could be a cheap imitation that could rust out.

You still might want to determine if it was flooded. Does the carfax show a lineage of where this car came from? General location?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
what year and engine? Looks like the 2.4l

The I4 dipstick looks like this OEM....


I'm gonna guess here but that does not look like the OEM dipstick that would be on a 2.4l 2013-2017 9th gen.

Another WAG that if it isn't the OEM that came with the engine it could be a cheap imitation that could rust out.

You still might want to determine if it was flooded. Does the carfax show a lineage of where this car came from? General location?
2015 2.4l. The cars form massachusetts.
Here's the full dip sitck
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· Elvira
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Yeah that appears to be OEM.

Are we sure it is rust? and not some gunk looking like rust?

Even though you don't see a milkshake in the oil cap they probably replaced the oil prior to sale and didn't bother to look at the dipstick.

How does the top of the stick look where the seals are located? Does the tube look damaged at all? Could water/moisture get in from the top?

40k after 7 years mean this didn't get used much and up in MA the condensation buildup in a lightly used engine during winter can easily oxidize either the tube or stick to rust a little. The volitile fumes caught in a low mileage car oil system can be corrosive.

Now for the difficult part .......the 2.4l sometimes have a problem with oil consumption and possibly oil dilution with fuel on the DI engines. Not all of them but a low mileage engine that might have been used for short trips exasperated the problem since nothing was ever totally burned off.

Don't remember hearing about flooding in MA (some family reside there) but that means nothing.

Wipe off the stick, keep checking the oil for fuel dilution and go from there.

Everything I mentioned is ALL conjecture based on what I know that can go wrong with a low mileage engine. Replacing the oil regularly, as has been shown, may be the saving grace in this situation
 
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· V6 Supremacist, but not as good as WiiMaster
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Are we sure it is rust? and not some gunk looking like rust?
This.

The part of the dipstick that is not immersed in oil will get condensate on it during operation. This typically forms that type of deposit on the dipstick. We often refer to it as "varnish."

Looks like previous owner did not use really good motor oil, and did not change it per the manual. Good news is that even with the worst brand of oil, at 40,000 miles that engine is more than likely very fine.

Start using a quality name brand oil, change the oil and filter per the owner's manual, and drive on.

OF
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This.

The part of the dipstick that is not immersed in oil will get condensate on it during operation. This typically forms that type of deposit on the dipstick. We often refer to it as "varnish."

Looks like previous owner did not use really good motor oil, and did not change it per the manual. Good news is that even with the worst brand of oil, at 40,000 miles that engine is more than likely very fine.

Start using a quality name brand oil, change the oil and filter per the owner's manual, and drive on.

OF
Welp you might be right. Upon closer inspection, I am no longer convinced it is in fact rust
 

· Cruising in Montana
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Regardless, I'm thinking the oil was not changed regularly, or yearly even. This is why Honda recommends yearly oil changes on cars that are rarely used - to get water vapor, acids and so on out of the engine. 40,000 miles / 7 years = 5,700 miles per year, probably not enough to trip the MM.
 

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In theory, if the dipstick has a coating of oil on it from normal use, wouldn't the oil preserve the metal and therefore prevent any rust from building up? I know oil doesn't flow to the top of the tube but there has to be enough in the vicinity to have even the slightest layer of oil on it. I guess I could go out and check my own dipstick for oil residue.
 

· Elvira
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In theory, if the dipstick has a coating of oil on it from normal use, wouldn't the oil preserve the metal and therefore prevent any rust from building up? I know oil doesn't flow to the top of the tube but there has to be enough in the vicinity to have even the slightest layer of oil on it. I guess I could go out and check my own dipstick for oil residue.
typically the stick is coated lightly in oil, at least everytime I remove it to check level.

the tube itself is a "vent" of sorts and when the engine pressurizes it will push oil laden air/gases up the tube. Sometimes, and I mean sometimes if the PCV is stuck closed the dipstick might pop out. I'm fairly confident the dual rubber seals are there for two purposes and they are to retain plug in tube and seal off the venting through the dipstick tube.

But if the engine isn't turned over for an extended period of time, that oil will drain off.

Welp you might be right. Upon closer inspection, I am no longer convinced it is in fact rust
Is that "stuff" magnetic? that'll determine if it's rust or guck.
 

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Yeah that appears to be OEM.

Are we sure it is rust? and not some gunk looking like rust?

Even though you don't see a milkshake in the oil cap they probably replaced the oil prior to sale and didn't bother to look at the dipstick.

How does the top of the stick look where the seals are located? Does the tube look damaged at all? Could water/moisture get in from the top?

40k after 7 years mean this didn't get used much and up in MA the condensation buildup in a lightly used engine during winter can easily oxidize either the tube or stick to rust a little. The volitile fumes caught in a low mileage car oil system can be corrosive.

Now for the difficult part .......the 2.4l sometimes have a problem with oil consumption and possibly oil dilution with fuel on the DI engines. Not all of them but a low mileage engine that might have been used for short trips exasperated the problem since nothing was ever totally burned off.

Don't remember hearing about flooding in MA (some family reside there) but that means nothing.

Wipe off the stick, keep checking the oil for fuel dilution and go from there.

Everything I mentioned is ALL conjecture based on what I know that can go wrong with a low mileage engine. Replacing the oil regularly, as has been shown, may be the saving grace in this situation
This^^^ I'll add that if the car wasn't run long enough to burn off all the condensation then this will happen
 
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