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Is that the famous quad four engine? Oh my goodness- when I grew up in the 80s and 90s my parents refused to buy anything other than GM products.
It was a single-cam variant called the Quad OHC instead of the Quad 4.

My grandfather was a GM customer. My father preferred Ford. I followed in my grandfather's footsteps until 2006 when I bought my first of 12 Hondas so far. I'm no longer enamored with Honda even though I currently own a '21 Ridgeline.
 

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It was a single-cam variant called the Quad OHC instead of the Quad 4.

My grandfather was a GM customer. My father preferred Ford. I followed in my grandfather's footsteps until 2006 when I bought my first of 12 Hondas so far. I'm no longer enamored with Honda even though I currently own a '21 Ridgeline.
Honda & Toyota products used to be heads and tails above almost anything else on the market in terms of reliability and durability- maybe with the exception of heavy duty pickups. Now it seems like they have slipped a bit in terms of quality control while the competition has gotten a lot more competitive. I still prefer both Honda and Toyota over many other makes- but the ultimate quest for profit has led to Honda and Toyota to make some questionable decisions in the past ten years.

My wife's 2007 Camry Hybrid has gone fourteen years and 180,000 miles without a single part breaking or malfunctioning- with the exception of a water pump that was replaced under warranty early in the car's life. I had a 1998 Camry that was also bulletproof in terms of reliability. I don't envision my 2021 Accord- or a new Camry for that matter- could last that long without issues.

As for the Ridgeline- that's an interesting truck- along with the Pilot, Passport, and other Hondas that use that 9-speed transmission. When I bought my 2021 Accord- I did what I always do when I buy a car- when they were processing the paperwork- I walked around the showroom... and eventually took a hard look at a 2021 Passport EXL... which would have likely cost about the same as what I paid for my Accord Touring after some negotiations. The salesman that was helping me noticed that I was really looking at it- and asked if I was having second thoughts about buying an Accord. I admitted that I really liked the Passport- but I would never buy a Honda with that 9-speed transmission. He laughed and said that he completely understood- and would never argue with anyone about harping on that transmission. He also said that he hopes that Honda will start offering those vehicles with the 10-speed automatic. I think that they might eventually- as the new MDX uses that transmission and Honda started putting in into the Odyssey a few years ago.

I never knew (until that salesman told me) that the 9 speed transmissions in those trucks and SUVs is actually the same transmission that's used in several Chrysler products... and it suddenly made a lot of sense.
 
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Labeling can reduce automotive possibilities. Audi sudden acceleration, CRV oil dilution, VCM catastrophic engine failure, 9 speed a total disaster. 2002 Odyssey transmission failures, therefore all Honda transmissions suck. I had a 2017 Ridgeline that frustrated me. A mushy brake pedal, an engine knock and a mushy shifting transmission made for an unpleasant ownership experience. When covid came I traded the Ridgeline in on a Passport. My expectations were that the 9 speed and the 20 inch wheels would be the problem areas. I read the long term test of a Honda Pilot touring with the 9 speed and it was a total disaster. I've read Acura forums where the 9 speed in V6 TLX's just ruined the rest of the car. My sister got a 17 MDX in 2017 and I told her to get the RDX because the MDX had the dreaded 9 speed. Well, my sister still has the MDX, zero issues anywhere. On the Passport forum there are few complaints of 9 speed failures. Read the Ridgeline forum and theme emerges with the 6 speed transmission not up to the task when it gets hot and the fluid needs more frequent changing to stop judders. Meanwhile, my 2015 CRV had a CVT failure requiring replacement at 62k. Honda has had time to massage the 9 speed so I don't think it's an issue anymore. Love the Passport and I can use it all year in any condition anywhere unlike my Accord that usually sits for 3 months during the winter.

Last week I purchased a 2021 RAV4 XLE gas version for the wife and honestly I'm impressed. It handles so well, that I don't think I need to get a sedan with a lower seating position. This is my first Toyota. The 8 speed to me is better than the 9 speed. Toyota does some stupid things though. Their owners manuals are confusing, their parts diagrams to get a part number for something as simple as a transmission or rear diff crush washer is virtually impossible and their option packages are stupid. I can get a RAV4 with a heated steering wheel but no Homelink and no leather for the price I paid. Basically, Toyotas price out to be a triim level lower than a Honda and then Toyota charges for all those port installed options. I'm buying into all the Toyota hype about reliability I didn't even purchase an extended warranty. I like that all the fluids I can buy at Walmart with the exception of the transmission fluid which will probably have to be changed once during our expected ownership term. I'm hoping that when the RAV gets to the 6 year range it won't need much of anything while my Hondas will need 2k timing belt replacements and that's if nothing else major fails. Pretty sure my Passport will be my last Honda as 2030 (all electric) will be here. My goal is to own a Lexus before my driving days are over but the switch to Toyota has begun.
 

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I admitted that I really liked the Passport- but I would never buy a Honda with that 9-speed transmission. He laughed and said that he completely understood- and would never argue with anyone about harping on that transmission. He also said that he hopes that Honda will start offering those vehicles with the 10-speed automatic. I think that they might eventually- as the new MDX uses that transmission and Honda started putting in into the Odyssey a few years ago.

I never knew (until that salesman told me) that the 9 speed transmissions in those trucks and SUVs is actually the same transmission that's used in several Chrysler products... and it suddenly made a lot of sense.
I didn't much care for the 9-speed myself - at least on paper. After driving a 9-speed Passport both on and off road for a couple of days, I began to wonder what all the complaints were about. Having spent 3,000 miles with a 9-speed in a Ridgeline over the last few months, I now have no complaints about this transmission in normal driving*. In fact, I find it smoother than Honda's 6-speed or 10-speed transmissions.

*The biggest complaint I have with the 9-speed is the delay when downshifting from 8th or 5th where the transmission has to close the throttle, shift to neutral, increase the engine speed, wait for the two halves of a dog clutch to match speeds, engage the dog clutch, then open the throttle - a process that can take 1-2 seconds. It's unsettling and frustrating at times to mash your foot to the floor and nothing seems to happen for 1-2 seconds. This behavior is required because there are dog clutches between gears 4-5 and 7-8 that must engage on downshifts. Friction clutches are used between all other gears. Planning can eliminate this delay. For example, if you know you're about to pass, you can use the paddle shifters to downshift to 4th.

ZF has been building transmissions much longer than Honda. Their 8-speed transmission is a world-class unit with outstanding shift quality, durability, and performance, but it's only for RWD applications. It is used by some of the world's most prestigious brands such as Rolls Royce and most powerful models like the 840-HP Dodge Challenger SRT Demon. Their 9-speed was developed for FWD applications and, unlike the 8-speed, the 9-speed uses a couple of dog clutches in place of friction clutches to limit the transmission's dimensions. Dog clutches are like unsychronized gears in a manual transmission - they're either on or off and require precise speed-matching before engaging. More traditional friction clutches slip during shifts for faster, smoother shifting.

Honda's 2- through 6-speed transmissions were designed and built in house using parallel shafts like a manual transmission to avoid copying or licensing existing automatic transmission designs. Honda's 10-speed is their first automatic to use planetary gears like most other automatics transmissions have used for more than half a century.

A couple other ZF 9-speed items to keep in mind: 1) ZF provides base software which allows the transmissions to function. The automakers must refine the software for each application. Honda seemed to do a better job than Chrysler FCA Stellantis in this regard. 2) Stellantis builds their own 9-speed transmission under license from ZF. The 9-speeds that Honda uses are built by ZF. This could explain why the 9-speed has been a less painful experience overall for Honda than Stellantis.

Having owned several Honda products with the 6-, 9-, and 10-speed transmissions, I prefer the 9-speed over the 6-speed when it comes to reliability, durability, and smoothness, but I dislike the delay during some downshifts. I prefer the 10-speed over the 6-speed when it comes to reliability, durability, and performance, but I dislike the jerky shifts between 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. If Honda programmed the 10-speed to start in 2nd like the 9-speed, I might be happier with it.

Stellantis was one of the first customers to use the 9-speed followed by Honda/Acura and, most recently, Nissan/Infiniti in the Pathfinder and QX60. Honda is clearly transitioning from the 9-speed to the 10-speed as the unit is improved and production capacity increases. It will almost certainly be standard in the next generation Pilot, Ridgeline, and Passport.
 
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