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actually, we have just one. don't confuse the cat for the resonators ;)
Well, you called me out here on something off topic, so I'll reply here.

Better get to know your V6 Accord better...

Look at your exhaust manifold (both of them) and you'll find the 2 "primary" CATs. They are very close to the engine so they heat up as fast as possible.

Then follow the pipe and you'll find the one under the car, and that would be #3.
 

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Well, you called me out here on something off topic, so I'll reply here.

Better get to know your V6 Accord better...

Look at your exhaust manifold (both of them) and you'll find the 2 "primary" CATs. They are very close to the engine so they heat up as fast as possible.

Then follow the pipe and you'll find the one under the car, and that would be #3.
The V6 Accords do have three catalytic converters.

Major system components include two close-coupled primary catalytic converters, a secondary underfloor catalytic converter, a centrally positioned, high-flow resonator and dual rear silencers.
Source: http://www.honda.com/newsandviews/article.aspx?id=2003112035704

As far as the Seafoam goes, I did some research on it, and here's what I have to say:

Yes, it could kill your oxygen sensor and catalytic converter. It all depends on how well you treat your car and maintain it. Let's say you changed your oil every 3000 to 5000 miles with synthetic, used gasoline from a reputable gas station (Shell, Exxon, Chevron, etc.), and did other preventative maintenance at the scheduled intervals. Your engine should be mostly clean. It may have a little bit of gunk or carbon buildup though. Let's say you put a third each of Seafoam in the gas tank, crankcase, and intake. As long as you follow the manufacturer's directions, you should have little to no harm to your car. In fact, your car may (or may not) benefit from the treatment.

Now let's say you neglected your car and bought poor quality gasoline, changed your oil every 10,000 to 15,000 miles with conventional no-name brand oil, and failed to do preventative maintenance at the scheduled intervals. Also, let's say you've racked up well over 100,000 miles and want to do a Seafoam treatment. My best guess is that you have more crud sitting in your engine than Benny Lopez has in her lungs (You'll get the reference if you watch George Lopez.)! Seafoam may be harmful to your engine, catalytic converter, and oxygen sensor. First, Seafoam in the crankcase will break down the sludge holding up worn out seals and gaskets. That could cause a potential oil leak. Second, Seafoam in the intake will break down too much carbon buildup. Your oxygen sensor will get fouled, and your catalytic converter will not be able to process such a high amount of buildup and will clog. Seafoam in the gas tank will pretty much do no harm. It may clean your injectors.

I am not saying Seafoam is not recommended for high mileage vehicles. I am just merely stating that applying Seafoam to a higher mileage vehicle that has been neglected has a higher chance of doing more harm than good. If you are on top of all your maintenance and engine repairs, and you want to remove the little bit of sludge or carbon buildup in your engine, I believe doing a Seafoam treatment as directed by the instructions on the can will be beneficial to the vehicle.

Just remember... it's all about how you take care of your car.

My Accord has approximately 85,000 miles, and I do my maintenance as needed or recommended. I ran Seafoam in my gas tank, intake, and crankcase and have noticed a slight improvement in performance. Did it improve? I don't know. I would have to hook my car up to a dynamometer before and after the treatment to tell a difference. It could all just be in my head. I probably won't need another Seafoam treatment for another 20,000 miles. I run Mobil1 5W-20 fully synthetic motor oil with a Mobil1 oil filter. My crankcase should be fairly clean and free of most sludge, so a Seafoam treatment here would be fairly ineffective. I could dump a third of a bottle in my gas tank to clean my injectors. As far as running a Seafoam treatment through the intake, I'll probably just use some Seafoam spray before I change my spark plugs again. I'll use some throttle body cleaner for the throttle body though.

Well, that's my two cents on Seafoam now. Chime in if you want.
 

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I'm not trying to start an argument as I'm still new here lol or anything as this is an informative thread so I'll stop arguing, you know my feelings on it.
 

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Thank you for the information

I would like to thank all who have contributed to this sticky. I have long contemplated using seafoam and now have a conclusion and goona try it out
 

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I feel like the entire post is common sense, no offense, and I already brought it up just not that in depth. If you really take care of your engine, you probably don't need seafoam and if you never have taken care of it seafoam and break loose some of the crud and sludge that is holding leaks together.
 

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The V6 Accords do have three catalytic converters.
Well, you called me out here on something off topic, so I'll reply here.

Better get to know your V6 Accord better...

Look at your exhaust manifold (both of them) and you'll find the 2 "primary" CATs. They are very close to the engine so they heat up as fast as possible.

Then follow the pipe and you'll find the one under the car, and that would be #3.
really, where? last time i checked...which mind you, was over the weekend as I did my oil change...there was the just the exhaust manifold for each side, which then bolted on to the OEM J-Pipe which DOES have a "flex" pipe towards the end of it, which THEN bolts onto the Catalytic converter. From there, you have the rest of the exhaust system which is composed of the resonator and then the two exhausts on either side.

So, can either of you tell me where the other two CATs are at?
 

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I can't imagine th V6 from the factory would have one single cat. There are probably two precats as mentioned. Similar to the TL which has the pre-cat delete as such a common mod. I feel like it would be between the j pipe (or on the stock one) and the manifolds.
 

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I must say, Antartica's write up is good.
Its fair. No BS. Honest too.
Even brings up a good example.

My stance hasnt changed, but I will give props to a good post.
The Seafoam treatment in my intake as well as a spark plug change a couple days later had a huge benefit in my gas mileage. I used to get from a full tank of gas approximately 320 miles (with a combination of city and highway driving) until my low fuel light came on. So I got roughly 23 mpg (approximately 3 gallons left in tank when light comes on, so 320/14=22.8). A few days ago I filled up to a half tank, and I've got slightly under a quarter tank of gas and am at approximately 180 miles, so I'm figuring my mileage is around 36 mpg (180/5=36). I call BS, but I've done mostly highway driving and have been easy on the throttle. Next week when I fill up a full tank, I'll see what mileage I really get.

really, where? last time i checked...which mind you, was over the weekend as I did my oil change...there was the just the exhaust manifold for each side, which then bolted on to the OEM J-Pipe which DOES have a "flex" pipe towards the end of it, which THEN bolts onto the Catalytic converter. From there, you have the rest of the exhaust system which is composed of the resonator and then the two exhausts on either side.

So, can either of you tell me where the other two CATs are at?
This is coming directly from a Honda News and Views article posted on July 29, 2002. This page, Drivetrain - Part 3, describes the drivetrain of the then upcoming 2003 Honda Accord.

High-flow Exhaust System with Close-Coupled Catalyzers
The high efficiency exhaust system incorporates several key elements that work in concert with the engine's uniquely designed cylinder heads to help boost performance, reduce tailpipe emissions and trim weight. Major system components include two close-coupled primary catalytic converters, a secondary underfloor catalytic converter, a centrally positioned, high-flow resonator and dual rear silencers. Integrating the exhaust manifold into the head casting allowed the primary catalytic converters to be mounted directly to the exhaust orifice. This location ensures an extremely rapid light-off for the high-efficiency 900-cell per square inch converters, which directly contributes to the engine's exceptionally low emissions.

A new high flow hydroformed 2-into-1-collector pipe that transfers exhaust gasses to the secondary 350-cell converter also reduces exhaust backpressure. A new design for the silencer further reduces backpressure. The net result is a 30-percent drop in backpressure compared to the previous Accord V6. These improvements account for 15 of the extra 40 horsepower the new V6 develops. Eliminating a flange on the rear portion of the exhaust pipe and adopting a new, more compact design for the rear silencers also trimmed weight from the system. Because these smaller silencers are easier to package, the rear of the new Accord has a more refined appearance.
Majestic Honda, a Honda parts dealer, lists the primary catalytic converters located within the exhaust manifold for sale on their website. The parts listed below are for a 2003 Honda Accord V6, 2 door, EX trim, non navigation, non-California emission standards.

http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com...&catcgry4=KA6MT&catcgry5=EXHAUST+MANIFOLD+(V6)



Parts 7 and 8 are the two primary catalytic converters.

The following page shows the third converter located in the exhaust pipe:

http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com...(V6)&catcgry4=KA6MT&catcgry5=EXHAUST+PIPE+(V6)



Part 3 is the third, secondary converter.
 

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This is coming directly from a Honda News and Views article posted on July 29, 2002. This page, Drivetrain - Part 3, describes the drivetrain of the then upcoming 2003 Honda Accord.
so, are we talking about 6th or 7th gen accord here? cuz i've been talking about 6th gens, lol.

if 7th gen, then i can see why we disagree on the whole 3 CATs thing :banana:
 

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Oh okay. 6th gen V6s have one cat. 7th gen V6s have 3 cats. That's how they got ultra low emissions certified.
 

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I couldn't come up with any Honda press releases for the then upcoming 1998 Accord. All the releases were about the JDM/EDM Accord. Off topic though, I did learn that the 6th gen JDM/EDM Accords had an option for 4WD and navigation on some models (Torneo, Type-R). Anyway, I did a part search for the 1998 Honda Accord EX V6 coupe.

http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com...(V6)&catcgry4=KA4AT&catcgry5=EXHAUST+PIPE+(V6)



The picture lists part 3 as the catalytic converter for the exhaust, priced at a whopping $656.24! I hope none of you 6th gen owners ever need a new cat!

The catalytic converters in the 7th gen V6 Accords are located in the exhaust manifold. Doing a search for the 1998 V6 Accords revealed no catalytic converters in the exhaust mainifold.

http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com...&catcgry4=KA4AT&catcgry5=EXHAUST+MANIFOLD+(V6)



As far as I can see, the 6th gen V6 Accords only have one catalytic converter.
 

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they all have 3 cats V6 J30, J35 .
6th gens use the J30A1 while 7th gens use the J30A4 and then 7.5 gens use the J30A5. Same engine block and all, but with different revisions to it. going from 1 CAT to 3 CATs would be one of those revisions :tongue:

Oh okay. 6th gen V6s have one cat. 7th gen V6s have 3 cats. That's how they got ultra low emissions certified.
so we were both right :thmsup:

I couldn't come up with any Honda press releases for the then upcoming 1998 Accord. All the releases were about the JDM/EDM Accord. Off topic though, I did learn that the 6th gen JDM/EDM Accords had an option for 4WD and navigation on some models (Torneo, Type-R). Anyway, I did a part search for the 1998 Honda Accord EX V6 coupe.

http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com...(V6)&catcgry4=KA4AT&catcgry5=EXHAUST+PIPE+(V6)



The picture lists part 3 as the catalytic converter for the exhaust, priced at a whopping $656.24! I hope none of you 6th gen owners ever need a new cat!

The catalytic converters in the 7th gen V6 Accords are located in the exhaust manifold. Doing a search for the 1998 V6 Accords revealed no catalytic converters in the exhaust mainifold.

http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com...&catcgry4=KA4AT&catcgry5=EXHAUST+MANIFOLD+(V6)



As far as I can see, the 6th gen V6 Accords only have one catalytic converter.
If $656.24 is expensive for just 1 CAT, how much would it cost if a 7th gen owner had to replace all 3 cats?

never knew that there was a 4WD option for the 6th gen either. presumably for the european version of the accord? or is that what EDM stands for?
 

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The front primary converter costs $233.72, and the rear primary converter costs $233.34. The secondary converter costs $228.78. All three converters would cost a total of $695.84. Not too much more than a 6th gen V6 cat!
 

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EDM=European Domestic Market
 

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EDM, LMAO!

how can something be "EDM" when all of Europe is a bunch of different countries? JDM and USDM both make sense because the acronym is appropriate for that country/region.
 

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at least that's how i see it :tongue:
 

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Discussion Starter #80


Been using Seafoam for years on all types of vehicles, never, ever, had a problem.
 
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