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Discussion Starter #1
My 2017 hybrid goes next week at 20K to replace the tires and check the alignment. The rears (ok, they're technically on the front now after I rotated them at 15k, but the damage was done) have been worn down to the belts on the inside shoulder and the outside is not much better. Center tread is fine. I don't have an alignment report from the shop yet, so I do not know if the vehicle is out of spec.

Since this seems to be a known issue on the Accord for a while now, I was wondering if anyone had any experience with putting a rear camber kit on this model to fix excessive rear tire wear.
 

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You are saying this is a "known issue" that tires on the Accord get worn down to the belts at 15,000 miles?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You are saying this is a "known issue" that tires on the Accord get worn down to the belts at 15,000 miles?
No, I'm saying that excessive rear tire wear seems to be a problem for many late model Accords. I admit that I rotated the tires too late - but the amount of wear is way out of line with the mileage. Lots of discussions can be found about how the rear camber is not adjustable and often causes this problem.

I do not have any specifics yet on if this is the case with my car, but since I'll be spending hundreds of dollars on new rubber soon, and since Honda doesn't consider alignment to be a warranty issue, I thought I'd solicit opinions.
 

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I'm kind of in the same situation. Have some 2-year-old Conti PureContacts which I really like. Unfortunately, I think I omitted one rotation and, with a 10,000+ mile oil-change/rotation interval and road trips with a fully-loaded vehicle, the damage has been done, with the rears now having the inside shoulders cupped and/or feathered and a resulting increased noise level. I've tried rotating the tires to different positions (side-to-side, or to the front) but that just makes the noise intolerable.

Camber kits are available but I've read various things about the advisability of cranking in any/more positive camber. Bottom line is it might adversely affect the handling of the car in turns. Best advice, I guess, is don't go longer than 5,000 miles between rotations.
 

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Why don´t people rotate their tires every 5,000 miles, and eliminate this tire cupping?
Why don't people stop using the terms "feathering" and "cupping" interchangeably? They're not the same thing. If your tires are "cupping," rotating them every 5,000 miles wont stop them from "cupping."

https://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/how-to/g810/10-things-your-tires-can-tell-you-about-your-car/?slide=3

Cupping (Also Called Scalloping)



It Looks Like: A pattern of alternating hills and valleys

The Diagnosis: It happens when worn or damaged suspension components cause the tire to bounce as it travels, coming down harder on some spots of the tire than others. Bad shock absorbers are the usual cause, though anything that connects the wheel to the rest of the car could be a culprit.

Be careful with your diagnosis, though. Even tire shops sometimes incorrectly identify feathering or heel-toe wear as cupping. A wheel that is out of balance may also cause cupping or bald spots to form, though there will be fewer hills and valleys than you'd see with cupping caused by a failed shock absorber.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If 10000 miles is sufficient to severely wear a tire, and 15000 enough to destroy it, then no strict attention to a rotation schedule will do anything but delay the problem.

These tires have half of their tread life remaining in the center, and belts showing on the inside shoulder. By the second rotation to the rear, you'd be in the same boat.

Unless of course something has happened to knock it out of spec this early. That would be a first for any new car I have ever owned, at this mileage. The wife's CR-V, bought three months later, is wearing like I expect a new vehicle to behave.
 

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....and since Honda doesn't consider alignment to be a warranty issue
If 10000 miles is sufficient to severely wear a tire, and 15000 enough to destroy it...
If you had noticed severe wear on the tires at 10,000 miles, you should have taken your car in to have the alignment checked and corrected.

http://owners.honda.com/Documentum/Warranty/Handbooks/AWL50465.pdf

Wheel balancing and wheel alignment are covered for the first year or 12,000 miles, whichever comes first, unless required as part of a warranty repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you had noticed severe wear on the tires at 10,000 miles, you should have taken your car in to have the alignment checked and corrected.

http://owners.honda.com/Documentum/Warranty/Handbooks/AWL50465.pdf
No doubt I should have. In twenty years, owning 3 new Hondas and 2 new Volkswagens, I guess the complacency of never having to check the inside shoulder of my rear tires in the first 10k miles let me develop a bad habit of assuming my Accord would age as well. My personal history with alignment issues has been that they do not typically happen without a noticeable effect on handling.

Lesson learned.

Meanwhile, my local tire shop has had a rear camber set ordered for when they do the alignment, just in case they can't get it into spec with the stock suspension. They keep them at the warehouse because, as their technician said, the Accords do seem to have this problem. We'll see what happens.
 

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I've heard wear to the inside and outside with good tread in the center is also associated with improper inflation. Anyone living remotely convenient to a Discount Tire location should go every 5-6k miles for a free rotation and tire inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I had the tires replaced yesterday. The alignment shop said the alignment wasn't that far out and was adjusted to spec with no additional hardware required.

So we're left with a mystery on why two properly inflated tires on the rear of the vehicle wore out so fast. The two that spent most of their time on the front were wearing normally even though they spent the last 5000 miles on the rear too.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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I had the same problem with FRONT tires two weeks ago, having become lazy in rotating at 5k mile intervals. They were Conti ProContacts. Discount Tire is reliable, I've found, and they said rotation -- which they do free -- is critical to even wear.
 

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Rotation is not going to fix alignment problems; that's a big mistake. If alignment is a problem, rotation will make all tires damaged.
 
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