Drive Accord Honda Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
2017 Honda Accord V6 Touring Coupe
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a 2017 V6 Touring Coupe.

It's a smooth ride, and obviously would be especially when I'm comparing it to my old 2006 Accord. It also sounds good when I put my foot down more than my usual. The engine was well-kept. When I brought it to my mechanic for an oil change, nothing about its belly/chassis was "rotten," replaced, or damaged, nor did he comment . It's in very good condition as far as I can tell (although I know next to nothing about cars).

However, the acceleration (and the pedal) feels heavy/slow, especially if I want it to accelerate faster. Maybe I'm not used to putting more weight on the pedal because I drove my 06 accord like a grandma (a hand-me-down from my father who is also lightfooted), but if I wanted to see how fast it can jump from a stop to even 40mph, I feel like I really have to put my foot down.

With this 2017 one, idk how reviewers were clocking in 0-60 in under 6 seconds (but maybe they measure those with the gear shift at S, I really don't know about stuff like this). Perhaps this comparison is misguided, but when I drove my cousin's Lexus IS 250, that had a lighter pedal, and most reviews said that its 0-60 is a little over 6 seconds.

I guess my general questions are...is this "heavy" acceleration pedal a normal thing? Is it a Honda thing? Is it a specific to my car thing? Am I just not used to putting my foot down?

Sorry for my lack of knowledge. This is my first car I bought with my own dough and I'm proud of it. I was just wondering, for the acceleration it CAN potentially have (according to some reviews), it feels to me to be on the heavier/slow side. I'll be keeping it lightfooted for the most part anyway.

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
2017 Honda Accord, Coupe, Touring (V6, 6AT), 2017 Honda Accord Sedan, EXL V6 w/ Navi, Sensing
Joined
·
392 Posts
Congratulations on the new to you car. I have the same one.

As to less than impressive acceleration, perhaps the Econ button is on. Green button to the left of the steering wheel. It will display a Green leaf on the dash board. Turn that off on romp it. See what you think. Then put it in S mode and do it again. That’s how you will get a 0-60 time of around six seconds. Both of these modes will cost you some fuel, but might make you grin. You can do a search on this site and find out more about what the Econ and S modes do. Since you have a Touring, you’re I. For a surprise with the S mode. Besides changing the transmission shift points (makes it rev higher) it also tightens up the steering and the suspension. Quite noticeable on a twisty turny road. Almost like driving a different car.

Have fun and be safe. Let us know what you think after you spend some time playing with the modes. Oh, you also get paddle shifters on the Touring, not much more than a toy, but you may as well try them out too.
 

·
cvt - NOT
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
I could just be accustomed to the car's accelerator characteristics. But my V6 coupe pulls hard from a standstill, and also from a roll. Throttle response is even better after having the fuel pump recall performed.

Consider disabling the ECON mode, if you already haven't done so. Although, yes, you will pretty much need to get the pedal down about 3/4 of the way down to really propel the car from a standstill or while cruising.
 

·
Registered
2017 Honda Accord V6 Touring Coupe
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Congratulations on the new to you car. I have the same one.

As to less than impressive acceleration, perhaps the Econ button is on. Green button to the left of the steering wheel. It will display a Green leaf on the dash board. Turn that off on romp it. See what you think. Then put it in S mode and do it again. That’s how you will get a 0-60 time of around six seconds. Both of these modes will cost you some fuel, but might make you grin. You can do a search on this site and find out more about what the Econ and S modes do. Since you have a Touring, you’re I. For a surprise with the S mode. Besides changing the transmission shift points (makes it rev higher) it also tightens up the steering and the suspension. Quite noticeable on a twisty turny road. Almost like driving a different car.

Have fun and be safe. Let us know what you think after you spend some time playing with the modes. Oh, you also get paddle shifters on the Touring, not much more than a toy, but you may as well try them out too.
Eco mode is off for the feeling I'm experiencing. Just on regular drive. Perhaps I am just "lightfooted" and it's just the way that is.

I could just be accustomed to the car's accelerator characteristics. But my V6 coupe pulls hard from a standstill, and also from a roll. Throttle response is even better after having the fuel pump recall performed.

Consider disabling the ECON mode, if you already haven't done so. Although, yes, you will pretty much need to get the pedal down about 3/4 of the way down to really propel the car from a standstill or while cruising.
Econ mode is disabled. So that feeling of kinda flooring it is the norm then? Not that I will always want to just go 0-40 in a snap once a light turns green. I bought it used. Maybe the previous owner didn't perform the fuel pump recall? I wouldn't really know unless I check the details from the dealership or something along those lines

I think that I am just lightfooted. But comparing it to how I remember my cousin's IS 250 (which has less hp) or my gf's 230i, my car's acceleration pedal just seems to be more weighty. Again, these comparisons are probably not fair. Different manufacturers.

Overall, I love how it drives.
 

·
cvt - NOT
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
Definitely have a dealership run the car's VIN to see if the fuel pump recall has been done. As I understand it, this software update will also allow the car to relearn your driving habits as well. Not sure if the car will adjust to your driving habits since you purchased it. But definitely start depressing the accelerator 3/4 or more to improve/notice the car's acceleration prowess, and to see if the car begins to learn your driving acceleration style.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,442 Posts
How many miles on the car ? The car is probably shifting the trans. based on the previous owners driving style, on the 7th. gen. you only had to disconnect the neg. battery cable for a few minutes to clear the computers shift points, don't know on a 9th. gen. though. Sometimes you just have to "get into the pedal" more like when I drive my 04 160 hp compared to my 2017 185 hp.
 

·
Registered
2017 Honda Accord, Coupe, Touring (V6, 6AT), 2017 Honda Accord Sedan, EXL V6 w/ Navi, Sensing
Joined
·
392 Posts
On my coupe the fuel pump recall really did nothing. I suspect it was because it wasn’t cruded up with poor quality fuel remnants, even if the programming was revised. There was no change in fuel economy, as I’ve seen some folks suggest.

Dealers are hungry for work right now due to the pandemic lock downs. Mine called me a couple weeks and wanted to do the fuel pump recall on my wife’s sedan, just to give the techs something to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,697 Posts
Unfortunately, the heavy feeling and sluggish acceleration at part-throttle are normal for the V6/6AT. Despite being the higher-performance version of the Accord, it's still tuned for maximum fuel economy. This means that the throttle response is dulled (even in normal Drive mode) and the transmission upshifts to the highest gear as soon as possible. S Mode sharpens throttle response a bit, but I find that it makes the transmission behavior a little too aggressive for most normal situations. Since you have a coupe, you can at least control the shift points in S Mode with the paddle shifters if you so desire.

When I got my first 9th gen V6 sedan over 6 years ago, the throttle response off the line definitely took some getting used to. Coming directly from a much slower 8th gen I4/5AT (0-60 in about 8 seconds), I expected it to feel more responsive at part-throttle but it didn't. The 8G I4, as slow as it was, would respond instantly to the slightest tap of the accelerator and felt surprisingly eager given the meager amount of torque that it had for such a heavy car. OTOH, that car also pulled almost the same whether you were light on the throttle or flooring it, the only differences being how long the transmission held gears and the amount of noise coming from under the hood. At least with the V6 you do get a nice shove in the back with deeper prods of the go pedal. The trick to accelerating more quickly (and smoothly) with the V6/6AT without any obnoxious wheelspin is to gently roll into the accelerator until the car starts moving and then immediately stab the pedal down about halfway. Do it correctly, and the car will rip to the speed limit in no time with a nice, throaty growl. Wait too long to add throttle, and the transmission will be in 2nd gear by 5 mph, killing any meaningful forward progress.

Initially, I couldn't stand how sluggish this car felt at part-throttle but I eventually got used to it and learned how to manipulate the throttle to get the desired response for a given situation. And while I don't suggest forking out the cash for a KTuner device to the average Accord owner, I will say that a tune and 93 octane makes a noticeable difference over stock in terms of responsiveness. I recently went back to stock and 87 octane after running a tune for 3 straight years, and was immediately reminded of why I invested in a KTuner as soon as it became available for our car. I'm not saying it's a night and day difference, but the ability to tweak the throttle response, sharpen the transmission's shifts, disable VCM, all while adding a smidge of extra power does liven this car up a bit. Only you can decide if the $450 investment is worth it, though.
 
  • Like
Reactions: raveracruz

·
cvt - NOT
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
I recently went back to stock and 87 octane after running a tune for 3 straight years, and was immediately reminded of why I invested in a KTuner as soon as it became available for our car. I'm not saying it's a night and day difference, but the ability to tweak the throttle response, sharpen the transmission's shifts, disable VCM, all while adding a smidge of extra power does liven this car up a bit. Only you can decide if the $450 investment is worth it, though.
What was your reasoning for going back to stock? I am going to get the KTuner in the coming weeks, now that my B2B warranty expired. I really want to disable the VCM, and improve the car's shifting characteristics a bit. Do these basic changes require 93 octane?
 

·
Registered
2017 Honda Accord V6 Touring Coupe
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for your input! I went to the dealership to have the VIN checked and even mentioned the fuel pump recall. Person who assisted me came back with a sheet saying there is no open recall for my vehicle. Is it safe to assume that the previous owner got it performed? I'd like to believe so.

I know nothing about cars as I've said before, and while I can fork over the cash for a KTuner, which I still have to look up what it is, I might just fully embrace my "lightfootedness" with this car.

Definitely won't ruin the drive for me. I just wanted to know what everyone else who has the same/similar model has to say.

EDIT: Just to add, it just occurred to me that taking it to more than one dealership might be beneficial. If the second/third "opinion" from their computer is the same, which I'm assuming it will be, then yeah. I'm good to go.


How many miles on the car ? The car is probably shifting the trans. based on the previous owners driving style, on the 7th. gen. you only had to disconnect the neg. battery cable for a few minutes to clear the computers shift points, don't know on a 9th. gen. though. Sometimes you just have to "get into the pedal" more like when I drive my 04 160 hp compared to my 2017 185 hp.
There is about 21,100 miles on the car. Oh I didn't know I can do that. But since I don't trust myself with messing with anything with the engine, I might have a mechanic do it if it hasn't been done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
When I got my used 2017 V6 Touring Coupe it was very sluggish compared to my 2013 V6 EXL Coupe. I disconnected both battery cables touched the positive and negative together for about 10 minutes. Used Vise Grips. This will reset the computer. Hook the battery back up and let the computer relearn. It will take a couple of days to relearn your driving habits, drive it easy and it will remain sluggish, be more aggressive off the line the quicker it will be. Made a world of difference on my car, my 2017 is now quicker than my 2013. And if it doesn't work, you're only out 10-15 minutes of your time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
I recently purchased a 2017 V6 Touring Coupe.

It's a smooth ride, and obviously would be especially when I'm comparing it to my old 2006 Accord. It also sounds good when I put my foot down more than my usual. The engine was well-kept. When I brought it to my mechanic for an oil change, nothing about its belly/chassis was "rotten," replaced, or damaged, nor did he comment . It's in very good condition as far as I can tell (although I know next to nothing about cars).

However, the acceleration (and the pedal) feels heavy/slow, especially if I want it to accelerate faster. Maybe I'm not used to putting more weight on the pedal because I drove my 06 accord like a grandma (a hand-me-down from my father who is also lightfooted), but if I wanted to see how fast it can jump from a stop to even 40mph, I feel like I really have to put my foot down.

With this 2017 one, idk how reviewers were clocking in 0-60 in under 6 seconds (but maybe they measure those with the gear shift at S, I really don't know about stuff like this). Perhaps this comparison is misguided, but when I drove my cousin's Lexus IS 250, that had a lighter pedal, and most reviews said that its 0-60 is a little over 6 seconds.

I guess my general questions are...is this "heavy" acceleration pedal a normal thing? Is it a Honda thing? Is it a specific to my car thing? Am I just not used to putting my foot down?

Sorry for my lack of knowledge. This is my first car I bought with my own dough and I'm proud of it. I was just wondering, for the acceleration it CAN potentially have (according to some reviews), it feels to me to be on the heavier/slow side. I'll be keeping it lightfooted for the most part anyway.

Cheers!
Here are my suggestions on the performance.
1.) Use fuel injector cleaner. I have found this engine gets clogged injectors pretty easily.
2.) Don't use the econ mode. Engine response is much better without it and I have often wondered if it causes fouled injectors because it runs leaner.
3.) Have the brakes ever been changed? I have around 55k on my 2016 Touring and changed my brakes and rotors right before 50k with a Power Stop kit. I love the slotted rotors but the carbon fiber in the pads slowed my car down. I ended up going back to the OEM pads and the performance and gas mileage was restored. On a side note if you do your own brakes make sure you screw the rear calipers in all the way. I made the mistake of screwing them in just far enough to get them over the pads thinking they would adjust after some use. Wrong! I had to redo the work before finally switching to the OEM pads:-|
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Coming from familiarity with several other brands and models, the V6/AT coupe just happens to require a heavy foot to move the pedal and get the car going. Nothing wrong with it.

I was very surprised when I test drove mine at 2 miles on the odometer. It seems to want to go fast but the pedal just isn't as light as most other vehicles and it makes you wonder. You'll get used to it though and then you'll appreciate the drivetrain.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,697 Posts
What was your reasoning for going back to stock? I am going to get the KTuner in the coming weeks, now that my B2B warranty expired. I really want to disable the VCM, and improve the car's shifting characteristics a bit. Do these basic changes require 93 octane?
Sorry that I'm just now seeing your post.

I flashed back to stock (and reverted everything else back to stock, like all of the bulbs that I switched to LED) because I thought that I was going to trade the car in for a 2020 Accord EX-L 2.0T. However, I decided to hold onto it for at least another 6 months because I want to see what Honda does with the Accord's MMC before I make a decision. Not only that, but the redesigned TLX is now in the running as long as the pricing is reasonable.

As for KTuner, you can make the throttle tweaks and disable VCM without having to run 91+ octane. There are two baseline maps to choose from when you go to apply a tune: Standard and Tune 1. Tune 1 baseline recommends 91+ octane for the best performance and supports basic bolt-ons, while the standard tune is the same as the factory tune and therefore only requires 87. From there, you can customize the throttle maps, disable VCM, and enable the 'Improved Shifting' quick adjustment.

Don't get too excited about the improved shifting, though. It doesn't change when the transmission shifts, only how firmly it shifts. It will still short-shift into 2nd at part-throttle, and will still refuse to hold 1st gear right up to the redline at WOT. Instead, the upshifts are a bit less slurred (particularly at part-throttle), and downshifts while coasting seem to be a bit less dramatic. It also eliminates the 6AT's "shift flare" at low speeds, where the tach will sometimes spike upwards by 300-500 rpm right before the transmission engages the next gear. Both my 2014 and 2017 V6 sedans exhibit(ed) that behavior, but I no longer notice it when running the KTuner Improved Shifting setting (Level 1 or Level 2). It may change other characteristics of the transmission's behavior, but those are the few differences that I've personally noted. I hope this helps...
 
  • Like
Reactions: I800C0LLECT

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I also have a 2017 Accord coupe (touring trim) V6/AT. I do think this car is a dog off the line, and will barely break traction with a WOT start, but it has a good kick down once it gets going. I bought this car used with about 18K miles (now has 30K). I hardly ever drive this car hard, but I am concerned that it doesn't pull as hard as similar cars when I occasionally do want to jump off the line. Reading this thread makes me feel that it's not that unusual that acceleration from a standstill is not strong. My other car is a '06 GTO that had been my daily driver until I bought the Honda. It's not a good comparison point, LOL. I'm interested in some of the suggestions that the car has "learned to be slow" off the line. I have not taken the car in for the fuel pump recall yet, so maybe that would help some too. I had an Acura TLX walk me pretty easily this evening, so now I'm back on the hunt for missing torque (if there is any lost, that is...)
 

·
cvt - NOT
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
Definitely get the fuel pump recall done....

0-60/80/100 is the car's strong suit. For starters, try disconnecting the battery for a 30-60 minutes. Then start doing various hard pulls from a standstill or roll. Also, disable the fuel saving and traction control features too.

In terms of speed/performance you will need to be realistic too, as it's only a 287hp V6 engine - but definitely no slouch and shouldn't be walked by a stock TLX. Acceleration from 100+ is mediocre though by design.

You can also consider all the standard bolt-on mods as well....which the V6 responds quite well too.

I would imagine the V6 would feel slow compared to a NA/FI V8 :ROFLMAO:
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top