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As you know, we Accord Hybrid owners lack a spare tire. And I'm not talking about the one around your waist. Honda expects us to utilize the simplistic "green slime" and "12V air compressor" tool kit. I realize that it probably is sufficient for many flat tires, but it still leaves a lot to be desired. So the question is, IS ANYBODY PLAYING IT SAFE WITH A SPARE DONUT TIRE AND TOOL KIT?

If you are then you know the small trunk space got even smaller. I'm just curious to hear others' opinions on this.

I picked up a brand new spare donut and wheel for $40 and it lays flat in the trunk of the Hybrid. I suppose it would be good insurance on long distance trips and just left in the garage for the day-to-day driving around town. I'm looking to figure out a nice cosmetic method of keeping the tire in the trunk....similar to the OEM stryofoam insert with the jack and lug wrench. Any suggestions?

2015 Accord EX-L
Central Valley of California
 

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Runnin' in the 90s
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Get one of those spare tire covers with your favourite sports team or whatever on it, that might make it a little more aesthetically pleasing.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 
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I Carry a Spare

Um! Keep in mind, the spare isn't much good without a jack and lug wrench.

I also could not accept not having a spare in my 15 HAH, so I removed the tray and pump kit contents, bought a donut spare and a Honda jack kit in the styrofoam holder that sits inside the donut all off EBay. This whole assembly fits down in the hole left by removing the OE pump + storage tray, and with just a little padding, is flush with the bottom of the cover panel for the OE tray. There is no ring for a fastener to anchor the spare, but the friction material in the trunk floor holds the spare in place very well. Yes, the Owners Manual specifically say don't put a spare in the trunk because it might empale the high-voltage battery in the event of a rear end collision. I figure the simpleton who wrote that lawyer warning is far more worried about Honda's wallet than the Owner getting a flat, plus, in a rear end collision the person hitting me in the rear can buy the new battery.
 
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I own a 2017 Honda Accord Hybrid myself. Yes, this is the down side of the accord hybrids, no spare tire, a small trunk, and not fold-able rear seats.

What I've done is to completely remove that black Styrofoam box in which the the air inflator compressor is found after removing the trunk tray of course.
Soon you should notice :jawdrop:there is some space to jam a spare tire and or a jack kit.


I read somewhere sometime that there was a Honda Accord Hybrid owner that had a flat tire and the inflator and or tire repair kit didn't help to repair the flat having to call a tow truck. :0
 
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Bought a steel wheel and full sized tire from TireRack for approximately $100. Not much space left in trunk but sacrifice for real spare reassurance. Travel often to the boondocks where assistance or tow would likely be a problem.
 

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My 8th Gen V6 Coupe has a donut in the back trunk at all times. It also comes with a small scissor jack and lug nut wrench. Owner's Manual also tells me how to use them, so I am all set.

I have only used it once so far, and not for a popped tire, fortunately. I had to use it because I had a dented wheel rim and I had to leave the wheel with the rim repair shop for a day. I couldn't leave my car there because the place I was staying at was too far away from there. Ended up with the donut as the passenger side rear wheel.

I heard donut wheels have very short life, like 50 miles(80 km). Pretty sure I used all that up in those two days. Is that actually true? I know they are supposed to be backups and are not meant to last, but 50 miles seems to be too short for them to be useful. New ones are also expensive, so I still have that used donut in the back of my car.
 

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@UnknownJinX: I think these guys are talking specifically about the Hybrid, and it's lack of a dummy tire from the factory.

Donut/dummy tires can certainly go longer than 50 miles- I've seen some log 300 miles. Simply look at the tread. Since you are with your first car, I want to point out:

1) Dummy tire speed should not exceed 50 mph. (Maybe that is where you got that "50 mile" thing from?)
2) Check your dummy tire's pressure often! I fill mine up 4 times a year because it always goes from 60 psi to 45 psi. I lose 5 psi a month.
3) If you have to drive more than say 10-20 miles, and you have the safety and time, try to ensure that the drive train wheels (the front wheels on the Accord) are real wheels and tires, and the dummy tire goes on the back. I had to switch a flat front tire with a good, normal tire/wheel from the rear, THEN I placed the dummy tire on the rear.

Wise of you to ensure you have the jack and lug nut wrench, and know how to work them. In Germany, as part of getting a driver's license, you must demonstrate a tire/wheel change.
 

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Also have a hydraulic bottle jack and other tools in case of emergency. Have maintained never-used arsenal for decades. BTW, don't care about the trunk, if I did probably bought something else
 
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Elvira
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@UnknownJinX: I think these guys are talking specifically about the Hybrid, and it's lack of a dummy tire from the factory.

Donut/dummy tires can certainly go longer than 50 miles- I've seen some log 300 miles. Simply look at the tread. Since you are with your first car, I want to point out:

1) Dummy tire speed should not exceed 50 mph. (Maybe that is where you got that "50 mile" thing from?)
2) Check your dummy tire's pressure often! I fill mine up 4 times a year because it always goes from 60 psi to 45 psi. I lose 5 psi a month.
3) If you have to drive more than say 10-20 miles, and you have the safety and time, try to ensure that the drive train wheels (the front wheels on the Accord) are real wheels and tires, and the dummy tire goes on the back. I had to switch a flat front tire with a good, normal tire/wheel from the rear, THEN I placed the dummy tire on the rear.

Wise of you to ensure you have the jack and lug nut wrench, and know how to work them. In Germany, as part of getting a driver's license, you must demonstrate a tire/wheel change.
I've read somewhere the 50 mph and 50 mile usage is due to...

donut is 1 ply and no sidewall and won't last long.

donut is smaller diameter and could cause problem with drivetrain since 1 wheel needs to spin faster than the real tire. FWD or RWD. All-wheel drive is a nightmare (Ask any owner of a Volvo all-wheel drive using the Haldex ? transfer case.) Thousands of dollar fix because of a flat tire and donut use.

Since it is spinning faster it heats up faster losing integrity over the long run.

Probably a "scare" tactic to prod the owner to get the flat fixed sooner than later.

Cut down on loss of contact patch and control of car. Not sure if that's a manufacturer worry since that's the tire they gave you.

Most folks won't put a non-drive tire in place of the flat drive tire and exchange two tires on the side of the road. So that warning covers Honda's/tire manufacturer's butt in that case.



Taught my niece how to change flat, get gas, jumpstart a car the old fashion way with cables not a battery pack, check and add oil, etc,etc. Makes her self confident to do maintenance. She never changed oil though. That's next time I'm in MA. She's a CNA studying for a nursing degree and works some gosh-awful hours in all weather conditions.

Finally, ( I heard that back there ) the US license process is a joke.
 

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@UnknownJinX: I think these guys are talking specifically about the Hybrid, and it's lack of a dummy tire from the factory.

Donut/dummy tires can certainly go longer than 50 miles- I've seen some log 300 miles. Simply look at the tread. Since you are with your first car, I want to point out:

1) Dummy tire speed should not exceed 50 mph. (Maybe that is where you got that "50 mile" thing from?)
2) Check your dummy tire's pressure often! I fill mine up 4 times a year because it always goes from 60 psi to 45 psi. I lose 5 psi a month.
3) If you have to drive more than say 10-20 miles, and you have the safety and time, try to ensure that the drive train wheels (the front wheels on the Accord) are real wheels and tires, and the dummy tire goes on the back. I had to switch a flat front tire with a good, normal tire/wheel from the rear, THEN I placed the dummy tire on the rear.

Wise of you to ensure you have the jack and lug nut wrench, and know how to work them. In Germany, as part of getting a driver's license, you must demonstrate a tire/wheel change.
LOL thread hijacking!

Anyways, thanks Rick, good advice as usual.

As for #1, I have been warned about that by the wheel repair place when I left, and a good read of the label also told me to not go too fast.

I will definitely go check the air pressure of it! An easy thing to neglect.

I didn't know donut wheels would do damage to the diff, but I kinda figured it would be a bad idea to put the donut on the driven wheels. That's why it replaced one of the rear wheels. It's kind of a pain if your front tire goes flat though... With a single jack, you have to do 4 swaps: bad -> donut, good(from a rear wheel) -> bad(so something supports the car when the jack isn't at that corner), donut -> good, then finally bad -> donut again for the rear wheel.

I just don't want to spend unnecessary money buying another donut. The wheel repair was already expensive, just because I hit a curb too hard...:crying

Wise of you to ensure you have the jack and lug nut wrench, and know how to work them. In Germany, as part of getting a driver's license, you must demonstrate a tire/wheel change.
Taught my niece how to change flat, get gas, jumpstart a car the old fashion way with cables not a battery pack, check and add oil, etc,etc. Makes her self confident to do maintenance. She never changed oil though. That's next time I'm in MA. She's a CNA studying for a nursing degree and works some gosh-awful hours in all weather conditions.

Finally, ( I heard that back there ) the US license process is a joke.
I know some driving tests include more stuff in other countries, like the ones in China want you to demonstrate the ability to use the drive-by pay booth of parking lots. I think in North America, it's a bit of "go and learn by yourself as you drive", especially with the graduated driving program in BC, Canada. Some stuff will never be learned if not specifically taught, however, like Miker said, I doubt many drivers know how to properly jump a car(I carry jumper cables in the trunk at all times), change a flat tire or check the engine oil. While getting gas is simple, I see a lot of people "topping off" the gas tank when they fill up. I told an old guy "topping off" his car about how it's actually bad. He thanked me for it. I am surprised how many people do that. At best, you waste your money at the pump because modern pumps suck the "topped off" gas right back, at worst, you could mess up your EVAP system. I just wait until the first click and take the gun right out.

I've read somewhere the 50 mph and 50 mile usage is due to...

donut is 1 ply and no sidewall and won't last long.

donut is smaller diameter and could cause problem with drivetrain since 1 wheel needs to spin faster than the real tire. FWD or RWD. All-wheel drive is a nightmare (Ask any owner of a Volvo all-wheel drive using the Haldex ? transfer case.) Thousands of dollar fix because of a flat tire and donut use.

Since it is spinning faster it heats up faster losing integrity over the long run.

Probably a "scare" tactic to prod the owner to get the flat fixed sooner than later.

Cut down on loss of contact patch and control of car. Not sure if that's a manufacturer worry since that's the tire they gave you.

Most folks won't put a non-drive tire in place of the flat drive tire and exchange two tires on the side of the road. So that warning covers Honda's/tire manufacturer's butt in that case.
I just think 50 miles is way too short. If you popped a tire in the middle of nowhere, 50 miles isn't gonna do it. I think it's more reasonable to go with the tread.

As for AWD vehicles, most of them have a 2WD mode. Family SUVs like Honda CR-V have FWD and AWD modes(for higher trims in the CR-V's case), while performance vehicles like Infiniti Q60 have RWD and AWD modes. Regardless, both of them work only 2 wheels under optimal conditions to save on gas/improve performance(that's what Infiniti said, at least), and only work 4 wheels if they need to, such as in bad weather. I would imagine there is a switch for them. You can manually choose between the two modes. I think the computer could also figure out which wheel is a donut, and if the driver is smart enough to put them onto the 'optional drive wheels'(rear wheels on the CR-V, front wheels on the Q60), the computer would make the car stuck in the 2WD mode until the wheel is accounted for. Maybe the damage will still be there, but it will be less if they are just being dragged along like on a real 2WD car.
 
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I didn't know donut wheels would do damage to the diff, but I kinda figured it would be a bad idea to put the donut on the driven wheels. That's why it replaced one of the rear wheels. It's kind of a pain if your front tire goes flat though... With a single jack, you have to do 4 swaps: bad -> donut, good(from a rear wheel) -> bad(so something supports the car when the jack isn't at that corner), donut -> good, then finally bad -> donut again for the rear wheel.
Why not:

1) swap spare for rear tire
2) swap rear tire for bad front tire
 

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Why not:

1) swap spare for rear tire
2) swap rear tire for bad front tire
One of those days when I have a brain fart. Ugh.

(Yeah, I wrote this on my phone. Wow.)
 

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Elvira
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One important thing of note if you purchase a full size spare using a steel wheel instead of an alloy wheel.

You can't use the OEM ball radius alloy wheel lugs on the steel wheels.

If you purchase from Tirerack they include the lugs to be used exclusively for the steelies. My snows had them included with the non-interchangeable warning.

So, if you get a steelie from a yard or wherever, you'll need 5 appropriate lugs too. Remember to keep them WITH the steel wheel too. Thread them onto an appropriate length of 12x1.5 threaded rod through a mounting hole in the wheel to keep them from rolling around !

Steelie lugs are tapered 60° cone seat while the alloy lugs have a 12x1.5mm ball radius seat (2013 Honda OEM alloys).

Cones on alloys destroy the alloy seat area, ball radius on steel wheels won't tighten and you'll lose the wheel either way. :0

If your lugs are different than my example at least keep in mind the caution about ball seat lugs on steel wheels.


Here's a great post http://www.driveaccord.net/forums/1691298-post5.html Thanks @namegoeshere for this great post.

Here's the full thread in FAQs http://www.driveaccord.net/forums/6...itment-construction-lug-nuts.html#post1691298
 
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Thanks Miker!!! Have a Tirerack spare but could not recall receipt of steel lugs. After reading your post, marched to the cold garage and confirmed the appropriate lugs. Will sleep even better tonight!!!
 
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I own a 2017 Honda Accord Hybrid myself. Yes, this is the down side of the accord hybrids, no spare tire, a small trunk, and not fold-able rear seats.

What I've done is to completely remove that black Styrofoam box in which the the air inflator compressor is found after removing the trunk tray of course.
Soon you should notice :jawdrop:there is some space to jam a spare tire and or a jack kit.


I read somewhere sometime that there was a Honda Accord Hybrid owner that had a flat tire and the inflator and or tire repair kit didn't help to repair the flat having to call a tow truck. :0
That was probably my earlier thread - after getting 3 flats in as many months (only one bad enough to justify replacement tire), I went the same route... Found a seller on ebay that had the spare tire/wheel, jack and tools all in a kit for under 100 bucks, ordered the Styrofoam insert from a online dealer, and just yanked the little storage cubby out and stuck everything in the trunk.

As noted, there's no lug to secure the spare, but a little bit of packing material will keep it from moving around. The trunk floor cover still fits just fine.

I actually kept the inflator unit, it's fairly lightweight, and can sit on top of the battery cover with no apparent issues (there's a recessed section on the cover that almost seems made for it) - and the Velcro strap keeps that in place. It sits right next to the roadside emergency kit I kept from my old Jetta.....

Now that I have a spare tire, haven't had a single tire related issue - maybe the threat of being replaced by a donut spare has scared the standard tires into submission....:wink
 
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2017 size

Having trouble finding a spare tire for the 2017 HAH Touring...found kits on ebay but they are 16" and for a 2014-16 Accord. Would this fit the 2017 or do I need a different size? Could not find any spare tire kits on tire rack. Thanks for everyone's help!
 

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One important thing of note if you purchase a full size spare using a steel wheel instead of an alloy wheel.

You can't use the OEM ball radius alloy wheel lugs on the steel wheels.
That is particular to the steel wheel that you purchase. If you get an OEM Honda steel wheel, it takes the same ball seat as OEM Honda alloy wheels.
 

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Elvira
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That is particular to the steel wheel that you purchase. If you get an OEM Honda steel wheel, it takes the same ball seat as OEM Honda alloy wheels.
I stand corrected.

Good to know the OEM steel wheel uses same ball seat. I was coming from a different angle getting the steel wheels from someone like Tirerack. They definitely state use of different lugs for the Tirerack steelies.
 
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