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Just a quick follow up to this thread. Today my wife hit a pothole and blew out the front right tire. Split the side wall and dinged the rim a bit too. She was the first of two cars to hit the same pothole and blow out their tire.

I went to her to put on the spare and everything worked out ok using the parts mentioned in this thread.

As I mentioned earlier in this thread, the spare only fits on the rear of our Honda Accord Hybrid Touring (due to the brake calipers being larger on the front than the rear), so that meant removing the right rear tire, installing the spare in that location, then removing the right front tire and installing the right rear tire in that location.

Happy motoring.
 

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Does anyone know the size (specs) of a spare for the base hybrid. Is it the same as the higher trims others have mentioned in this thread

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I wonder if a 5 bolt pattern spare from another car (non-Honda) will work. Size is 155/60/R18. Difference in circumference is 0.8%. For reference, the difference in circumference between the two OEM spare sizes is 0.4% (135/80/R17 versus 135/90/R16). Sure it is lower profile and a little wider too (which shouldn't matter) but the R18 rim should clear the brakes on both axles easily.

From what I've read, the bolt pattern and circumference are most important but then again I try not to believe everything I read online. Thoughts?
 

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Does anyone know the size (specs) of a spare for the base hybrid. Is it the same as the higher trims others have mentioned in this thread

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I think all hybrid models come standard with 17" unless you choose to upgrade, so they should all be 135/90D16. I have a base hybrid and bought a spare of 135/90D16, which was the same spare size as the accord base non-hybrid. Check my original post #50 where I mentioned this and included pics. It's also the same as listed by BiBNJ in post #20 with all the details on what to buy to add in a spare tire + kit.
 

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Hey guys, my online order for my spare came in, and I am happy to report everything fit like a glove! This is what I ordered from HondaPartsNow.com (btw - they were great);

84542-TVA-A00BOX, TOOL
89211-S3V-A11Wrench, Wheel
89310-SHJ-A01Jack Assy., Pantograph
89320-SE5-A01Bar, Jack
42751-KEN-007TIRE, TEMPORARY (T135/90D16) (102M) (KENDA)
42700-T2A-A52Wheel,Disk 16X4T
74651-S2X-003Adapter, Spare Tire
74652-SDA-003Bolt, Spare Tire

I did go to the local gas station to have the tire mounted ($10) & the white gas nozzle came from the original kit.

Now I have piece of mind!
In the picture of the actual spare, what is the thing in the middle? Is it to hold the tire down when stored in the trunk?

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I was unhappy finding no spare in my new 2019 Accord Hybrid. Heard a rumor this was because the channels under the doors, where you normally jack the car up, contained high-voltage wiring in the Hybrid that might get crushed by the jack, causing major problems. I have no idea if that's true, but it's what I heard.

So I found a correct spare on eBay (Honda Spare Tire and Wheel - OEM T135/90D16 Space Saver, Temporary), bought it, and sure enough it fit beautifully in the round spare-tire well under the trunk floor, once I tossed the styrofoam placeholder thing out. I sawed a 2x4 to size and used that to help bolt the spare in, will use it to cushion things if I ever need to jack up the car. A cheap scissor jack and a 19mm swivelling breaker bar from my workshop fit neatly in beside the spare, and I'm good to go.

That rectangular compressor that came with the car, might still be good for something.
 

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Will a 17x4, from any of the other Honda Midels fit? I’m seeing a lot more spares for the CR-V and Odyssey’s than the Accord on e-bay
.
 

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Discussion Starter #108
...Heard a rumor this was because the channels under the doors, where you normally jack the car up, contained high-voltage wiring in the Hybrid that might get crushed by the jack, causing major problems...
I call BS on this rumor.

Page 635 of the 2018 Hybrid Owner's Manual clearly shows the jacking points under the car, which are in the same place as those on any non-hybrid car.

There is NO restriction on using a jack with the Hybrid. A company would be crazy to build a car with HV wiring located where it could be damaged by a routine maintenance task (i.e., rotating tires).

I think Honda just left out the spare to save money and to reduce weight and thus eke out a tiny bit more MPG.

Just to put this issue firmly to bed, I checked the Accord Hybrid Emergency Response Guide (which is a REALLY cool document available for download here: https://techinfo.honda.com/rjanisis/pubs/web/RJAAI001_HYBRID.htm), and it's clear that the HV wiring is nowhere near the jacking points.
 

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Will a 17x4, from any of the other Honda Midels fit? I’m seeing a lot more spares for the CR-V and Odyssey’s than the Accord on e-bay
.
I can't speak to the listings you're looking at, but I got excited over an older Odyssey spare tire available locally until I discovered that the bolt pattern for Odyssey in question is 5x120 where the Accord is 5x114.3. That means the diameter of the lugs on the Odyssey is 120mm and therefore wider than the Accord at 114.3mm and it wouldn't fit as is.

Anyone try to use the foam tool kit/box from the 9th generation Accord in an 2018 or 2019? I know that the earlier foam insert is smaller and won't cover the rearward portion of the trunk area, but it seems like that wouldn't be an issue other than aesthetics. Considering the 17" rim is the same on 18/19 as it is on 16/17, you would think the foam insert for the 17" would 'work' across the generation gap also even if it doesn't cover the same area at the rear of the car.

Also, I realize the part number for the pantograph jack doesn't correspond with earlier Accords (it does with Odysseys for some reason), but is there a reason why a jack from a 9th generation Accord wouldn't work? The curb weights of the cars are comparable. And they look very similar in photos. Anyone know?
 

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All the information I've seen to date shows that the 2018 Accord Hybrid will come with a Tire Repair Kit instead of the compact spare that's standard in the conventional versions. I assume Honda eliminated the spare tire to reduce weight and thus perhaps eke out another 0.001 MPG.

I get an average of probably two flat tires per year, mainly from nails and screws that litter the streets where I live, and for that reason I've never considered buying a car that doesn't have some kind of spare tire. I just don't trust repair kits.

But I like everything else that I've learned about the '18 Hybrid so much that it almost overrides my strong objection to its apparent lack of a spare.

Does anyone know if the Hybrid has the same well under the trunk floor as the conventional Accords, in which a spare tire COULD be carried if purchased separately?

Thanks.
This thread header could use updating for 2019.
I will be looking to replace the crap that came with the car, with a real temporary spare. I expect to find a temp that is almost exactly the same size, and will also order a jack kit. Did that for my last car, and had no issues. And no flats, but really, the goo to spray inside your tire?
 

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So, in hopes of paying it forward, here is some of what I learned from trying to piece together my own spare tire kit for my 2019.

First off, at least for 2019, all hybrid trims appear to come with the larger 12.3 inch front brake rotors based off the Honda specs here under body/suspension/chassis. That means the hybrid, regardless of trim, takes the same spare tire and tool kit as the Sport trims and the 2.0T trim EX-L and Touring which is the 17inch rim with T135/80D17 tire. This way the spare can fit on either the front or rear axle. Up to you whether you drive with one on the front or not - I've done it for short distances before. I haven't checked the specs on the 2018 hybrid model but the front rotor sizing might be the same as 2019.

This is the first important matter to note as the majority of Accord spare tires from older models are the 16 inch rim. And before you go buying a spare from an Odyssey because the tire is the same size, the bolt pattern for the rim is different. Yes, they both use 5 lugs but the PCD of the Odyssey lugs is wider. You need a 17x4 rim with a 5x114.3mm (4.5") bolt pattern. Even if you find a spare from another make with those specs you still need to make sure the hub spacing is exact or you'll need a spacer if you don't want to damage the hub (or risk the tire wobbling). Unless you really know rim sizing (which I don't), you're better off sticking with the right size from Honda.

Tire:
T135/80D17 – can purchase for a little over $110 online from Tire Rack and pay $10-20 to mount locally.

Rim:
As posted on here already, the rim is Disk, Wheel (17X4T) (Cmwa) – Product ID: 42700-T2A-L51. It can be found online for $82.52 plus hefty shipping. You are probably better off trying to get wholesale pricing at your local dealer - mine could special order it for $100.50 plus tax which was cheaper than online with shipping.

Buying Used:
As you can see, parting the tire and rim together will probably run you $250 or more. So you might want to look into used options. According to online parts sites, the same part number for the rim is compatible across the following Accords: 2019/2018 Sport and 2.0L models, 2017/2016 Sport and Touring. That means if you are searching used parts or eBay, those are the donor cars you are looking for.

Here are some examples of online listings available at the time of posting:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/2016-2017-2018-HONDA-ACCORD-SPARE-TIRE-WHEEL-DONUT-135-80-17-17-WITH-JACK-KIT/264332276034 - probably from a 2016, listed for $169 plus shipping (includes jack and tools, more on that later). Others have posted on here about purchasing from this eBay seller rv0761. I bought this also (more on that later).
https://ahparts.com/buy-used/2016-honda-accord-rim-17-spare-wheel-135-80-17-35-life/217823-1 - from a 2016, listed for $100 plus shipping (tire and rim only, no tools)
https://ahparts.com/buy-used/2018-honda-accord-wheel-rim-spare-tire-42700-t2a-l51-42700t2al51/258592-1 - from a 2018, call for price
https://offerup.com/item/detail/613432418/- possibly off a 2018, listed for $95 plus shipping (tire and rim only, no tools)

You can make lower offers on these used listings and see if you can drop the price. One caution with buying used is to take note of the condition and wear of the tire. Ideally the listing would have good photos so you can see the condition/wear and note the proper size. Also, if the photo is good enough - you might see the T2A stamp in the bolt pattern and maybe even the date code on the tire showing the week/year when the tire was made. A tire from a 2016 model would probably 2-3 years older than the tires on your 2018/2019. A fresher tire is better if you can find one like from the 2018 linked above. But even a 2016 tire in good condition will last many years in your trunk, not exposed to the elements.

You can also search the used car part interchange found here - http://www.car-part.com/cgi-bin/search.cgi. You should search on a Honda Accord (pick a year from 2016/2017/2018) and select Wheel as the part and then pick the 17x4 steel wheel. That should give you a listing of local junkyards that show that part available and the 2016/2017/2018 model it came from. Even if you search on a 2016, you will get hits on a 2017 and 2018 since the part number is the same. You'll have to call to verify condition, stock and pricing. Maybe you'll find one close to you so you can inspect in person and avoid shipping. I only found places more than 200 miles away that would sell me one for $50-$75, but it didn't make sense with shipping. Also, you don't get to see photos ahead of time or get buyer protection like you do on eBay and other sites.

There is some risk with buying used so it is up to you to decide how much it is worth to save $ over buying new. I bought used and had the spared inspected and mounted by a local shop during the return period to make sure it was alright.

Now that you've got the tire and rim, it's time to get the tools.

Jack and Tools:
Adding to the parts list posted earlier in the thread, I noted the compatible models that these parts come from in case you want to find them used also. I also noted what the part is as some the descriptions are odd in my opinion. Prices were from Bernardi online before shipping and wholesale from my local dealer before tax. I shared Bernardi as they were the only that had reasonable shipping costs on the large foam box tool. As others have posted, you could buy that part locally to save on shipping and get the rest online for less if you want.

Box, Tool [foam insert to hold tools in spare rim] - only available in 2018 and 2019 Accord models
Product ID: 84542-TVA-A10 (be sure to get the right part number so it fits the 17 inch rim that it rests in)
$22.52 online/$32.75 local

Wrench, Wheel [lug wrench] - Widely used in 2008-19 Accord, 07-11 CRV, 03-11 Element, 03-08 Pilot
Product ID: 89211-S3V-A11
$8.46 online/$12.30 local

Jack Assembly, Pantograph [the jack] - 2018-19 Accord or 2005-2019 Odyssey
Product ID: 89310-SHJ-A01
$17.73 online/$25.78 local

Bar, Jack [handle used to turn jack] - Very common, Accord since 1988, Civic since 1990, etc.
Product ID: 89320-SE5-A01
$21.68 online/$31.53 local

Adapter, Spare Tire [insert for tire holder] - Accord, Civic, or CRV since 2008
Product ID: 74651-S2X-003
$4.88 online/$7.10 local

Bolt, Spare Tire [screw to hold down tire] - Accord or CRV since 2007
Product ID: 74652-SDA-003
$3.74 online/$5.45 local

Total Jack Kit with all parts: $95.55 online shipped (Bernardi)/$125 w/tax (local)

I will share some photos I took of OEM spare tire kits I took for reference purposes later on as well as share more on my eBay purchase.
 

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Here are some closeup pics of the OEM spare tire kit to supplement somes of the good pics already in this thread. I used these for reference when shopping for used tools online. Photos were taken using a spare tire kit from a 2019 Sport trim so this exact kit would work for a hybrid.

Below is the date code showing the week and year the tire was made. For this 2019 Sport trim the spare tire was made the 11th week of 2018. Chances are that a new build will have a spare that is 6 months to 1 year old already. From online photos of spares for sale, it seems the date codes are marked white.

512745


Below is a close up of the bolt pattern. Note the T2A stamp associated with the part number.
512746


Here is the tread pattern on the Goodyear spare. The Kenda I got is a different pattern but since it is a spare I am not sure the pattern matters so long as there is tread left.
512747


Here is a photo of the side profile of the rim from above to demonstrate the offset that you don't see in most photos:
512748


Here are two photos of the spare tire adapter and bolt. These two pieces connect before you install it to hold the tire down. The adapter can be reversed when a full size needs to be bolted down in the well.
512749

512750


Here is the foam tool box with the tool kit in it. Note the edges are very thin so be careful when handling.
512752


Here is the wheel wrench for removing the lugs:
512751


Here is the jack bar used to turn the jack with the wrench:
512753


Here is a close up of the specs on the pantograph jack. The 3,080lb load is more than is needed for this car.
512754
 

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So as mentioned in my post above, I ended up buying the spare tire kit from a 2016 Accord (Sport/Touring with 17 inch spare) for my hybrid off eBay (from seller rv0761). I considering buying all new parts for the tire and rim along with the jack kit. That would have run me about $350 so I decided to explore used options. My goal was to come in under $200 shipped and buy off eBay for the added buyer protection. So I decided to get that used 2016 kit linked earlier. All the parts numbers for the 2016 17 inch kit match up except for the jack and tool tray but I thought I would give those a try. If they didn't work, it would only be another $60 in parts to get those two pieces.

First I checked the tire condition and tested the tire inflation to be sure it could hold 60psi. The tire I purchased was made in the 32nd week of 2015. That means it is about 2.5 years older than the tire I found in a 2019 Sport on the lot so the age difference wasn't too bad.

Next I took it to a local tire shop and tipped the guy $5 to help me inspect and install it to be sure if was a exact fit (don't want any surprises if/when it's needed). Be sure to make sure the lug nuts seat properly on the spare and afterwards that your tire gets reinstalled with the correct torque.
512755
512756


So the jack that came with the kit didn't seem to be Honda OEM so I wanted to make it worked. I did a test at home and the jack was able to lift the car easily. It is rated for 2400lb which is more than enough for one corner of this car. Below are photos I took of the little test.
512758
512759
512760


For the 10th generation, Honda stopped using the same jack as the previous Accord and went with the jack from the Odyssey. The new Accord weighs about as much as the last generation so it would seem that jack would still work. The Odyssey weighs 1,000lbs more than the Accord so it's higher load jack seems overkill. Based on a side by side comparison it appeared that they want go with a lower profile jack due reduced clearance under the trunk lid (more on that later). Here is the silver jack I got side by side with the black jack from the 2019 Sport trim:
512761
512762
512763
 

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The foam tool box that came with the 2016/2017 kit is thicker than the one for the 2018/2019. I assume this is was changed in 2018 to lower the trunk deck lid by an inch to increase trunk capacity. Here are side by side pics of the two foam tool kits. You can see how the 2018/2019 foam kit covers more to the edge.

2018/2019:
512769


2016/2017:
512770


While the edge to edge foam of the 2018/2019 looks better, it is thinner and more fragile and I like that I can easily store items (i.e. medical and roadside kit) next to the spare with the smaller foam box. Unfortunately, the tire inflator doesn't fit in there.

From the side you can see how much thicker the 2016/2017 tool box is compared to the new version.
2018/2019:
512766


2016/2017:
512767


The downside is the extra thickness means that the trunk deck lid does not sit flush at the edge with the thicker foam kit in it. It rests on the foam about an inch too high as you can see below.
512768


Just to be sure that the tire or rim weren't causing the clearance issue, I borrowed a 2018/2019 foam tool box and it allowed the trunk deck lid to sit flush in my car with my used spare.

While the jack seems to work fine, the thicker foam tool box is not a perfect fit. Since I am using trunk liner, you really don't notice the fit of the trunk deck lid. I may buy the correct part later but I am not in a rush.

I ended up keeping the tire inflator that came with the hybrid in a bag on one of the hooks in the trunk. Not sure what to do with the hybrid foam storage box that was previously there. For now it has a home in my garage.
 

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Great, and thorough, write-up(s) by thefisch! His part numbers and other info agrees totally with my experience from buying everything for my 2018 HAH Touring. (And yes, all of the 2018 hybrid trim levels have the larger front brake rotors, same as 2019.)

One thing I thought I'd add, about the foam tool box. For all of the other parts, it was cheaper to order them from the usual online discount Honda parts sources. But for the foam box, it was cheaper to get that one part from a Honda dealer. (At least this was the case several months ago....) Make sure you specify the foam box part number that goes with the 17" spare wheel and tire, and not the foam box that goes with the 16" spare, as thefisch stated......

I bought a new tire, ordered separately from the wheel/rim. (And then had it mounted at a local store.) When I was looking, I found correct-size tires from various manufacturers, but with vastly different prices. The Tire Rack had a couple/few choices, with at least one of them being at a decent price. But I found a cheaper one (maybe Hankook, I can't recall) at another parts discounter. Note that the official Honda part number for the tire has different letter suffix codes for different manufacturers, and the price varies from below $100 to over $200. A given parts outlet might only show one choice, so be wary and shop around....

If The Tire Rack has a good price, that you can't beat elsewhere, one nice thing is that they will ship the tire direct to a local Costco, for mounting.

For the time being, I am just keeping the old foam in the trunk, sitting on top of the trunk floor. It holds the inflator (which I like having around, just to use as an emergency inflator, without the foam), as well as a few other items. If we ever need more trunk space for luggage, I'll just take it out temporarily. (That said, it does slide around a bit....)
 

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I have bad memories of years ago blowing a tire on one of my old sports cars in a remote area and spending all day driving slowly on a donut spare trying to get to a larger city where I could find a size matched tire for the one that blew. I don't like donut spares, so for my 2018 hybrid ex I purchased an aftermarket 17" steel wheel with a mounted and balanced lower priced 225/50r17 tire. It came with a lug nut set, and I already had a jack/lug wrench assembly from one of my kid's cars that was junked long ago. Tire/wheel assembly fits the car perfectly front or back, but does cause about a 3 inch bump up of the spare tire cover panel. I lined the spare area with bubble wrap foil insulation and have 3" foam rollers under the side areas of the cover for support and just in case increased noise could be an issue. I have traveled with my wife to several different states over the last year and the raised panel causes us no issues. I am sure some will find this raised panel approach to be absolutely unacceptable, but it works for me and I don't think I spent more than a $120.
 

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Well, I still prefer to buy everything new from a dealer and/or tire store for a new car even though it's more expensive. Parts from reckage give me goosebumps.
 

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Discussion Starter #118
Well, I still prefer to buy everything new from a dealer and/or tire store for a new car even though it's more expensive. Parts from reckage give me goosebumps.
Regardless of where you buy the spare tire and accessories, and what you pay for them (within reason), it's good insurance and a valuable investment, IMO.
 

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Just ordered the parts per post #81 in this thread. Ordered a Kumho T135/80D17 from TireRack. Once all the pieces come in and I get things squared away I'll post some pics etc. - this will be for my new 2019 HAH Touring, pretty fired up about the new ride!
 

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All the information I've seen to date shows that the 2018 Accord Hybrid will come with a Tire Repair Kit instead of the compact spare that's standard in the conventional versions. I assume Honda eliminated the spare tire to reduce weight and thus perhaps eke out another 0.001 MPG.

I get an average of probably two flat tires per year, mainly from nails and screws that litter the streets where I live, and for that reason I've never considered buying a car that doesn't have some kind of spare tire. I just don't trust repair kits.

But I like everything else that I've learned about the '18 Hybrid so much that it almost overrides my strong objection to its apparent lack of a spare.

Does anyone know if the Hybrid has the same well under the trunk floor as the conventional Accords, in which a spare tire COULD be carried if purchased separately?

Thanks.
I just purchased a 2019 Honda Hybrid Touring. It has the complete setup in the trunk for a 17" donut Spare. I bought the Tire, Wheel, Jack and Jack Crank for $240.00 including shipping on Ebay. I bought the bolt, Flange that holds the wheel down and the Tool box ( which is the molded styrofoam top) from the dealer for about $52.00. I hope this helps. It all fits just like it came with the car. You can buy the parts individually from Honda if you get the 17" donut tire spare for the 2019 Accord SE that has 17" wheels, but they will charge you about $460.00.
 
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