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No problem with the Fel Pro upper plenum gasket set right? I used the same exact one. The top cover gasket just sandwiches flat once you lay down the top cover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Correct. No problems with any of my Fel Pro gaskets. The top cover gasket was already pretty flat. The one that I was more concerned about the waviness was the one under the intake manifold that mates to the intake runners. It seemed pretty bad, but it worked out just fine. No hissing suction noises, steady idle, and no check engine light.

Just about the toughest part was getting the spark plug tube seals lined up on the rear bank. Ugh! I needed more hands to line up the cover, hold a mirror in place to see, and then poke the gasket into place around the tube. Tedious!
 

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I hear you on the spark plug tube seals. I even put silicone paste around the tube and the gasket's inner ring to try to glide it in. Still the round portion would not set in, it gets pinched on the tube's top constantly. I was afraid of damaging it because I was poking it in with a metal pocket screwdriver. I ended up cutting off portion of a hand held teeth floss, which is totally plastic, then I used that to push the pinched rubber gasket over the tube's body. It is real pain in the @$$ ! Glad I don't have to do that for another many years to come.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
New Filters & Code P0404 (EGR Valve Error)

New Engine & Cabin Air Filters, September 2017, ~188,000 miles
In preparation for a 750 mile road trip I replaced the filters. I had heard that the carbon filter helped with odors, like diesel, so I thought I'd give it a try. So far, I haven't noticed any difference in what I normally smell. Oh well, it wasn't much more than the regular filters.

Honda OEM Engine Air Filter, 17220-RDA-A00, $23 from Amazon
Carrep Cabin Air Filter with Carbon, $10 from Amazon

Check Engine Light, Code P0404, September 2017, ~189,000 miles
On a short drive in town, I noticed the idle dropped down to ~500 RPM at a stop light. I blipped the throttle, and it revved a little bit sluggishly at first, and then sounded normal. When the light changed, it hesitated slightly, and then took off normally. I accelerated kind of hard as a test, and it felt like it had normal power. Based on those two things, I thought it must be idle air control related (not likely to be a misfire if I have normal power). No check engine light came on at this point. I did just remove the intake manifold and cleaned a bunch of stuff in there last month when I did the valve adjustment, so maybe I messed something up?

When we were done in the store, I drove home. Pretty much the same symptoms, except this time it actually stalled on my once. Just before we got home I got a check engine light, which was good, because then I would actually have a code to read! I pulled the code and got P0404 for the EGR valve. Since this is one of the things I inspected and cleaned when I did the intake I was puzzled. So I did the resistance checks in the manual, and it passed. Next I was going to remove it and apply 12V to pin 4 and ground at pin 6 to see if the valve opened. But even before I got there I found the problem! There was a "large" chunk of carbon stuck in the valve, holding it open.




I cleared the code and when I drove it to work today everything was just fine. Rock solid idle at about 750 RPM.

Even when I removed the EGR valve and inspected/cleaned it previously I didn't insert anything into the exhaust side of the system because I knew I wouldn't have any way to get out the chunks I dislodged. So why did this happen now? Where did this chunk of carbon come from? I did break it up, and it was just carbon all the way through, although you can see one side had a white tint on the surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I am well overdue for an update to this thread. Things have been really busy, so I haven't documented as well as I should have. Three separate trips out of the country totaling 5 weeks in the last 4 months really adds up. Anyway...

Replaced Accessory Drive Belt, August 2017, ~187,000 miles
Accessory drive belt was making some noise, and was somewhat stretched according to the arrow indicator, so I thought I'd try the belt before I replaced the tensioner.

Continental Elite 4060840, $26 from Amazon

Ran some BG 44K Fuel Cleaner, November 2017, ~192,000 miles
My fuel economy has been ever so slightly declining, so I thought I'd try some of this stuff. I'd heard good things about it, but it didn't make any significant change to my fuel economy.

BG 44K Fuel System Cleaner Power Enhancer with Funnel, $19 from Amazon

Rebuilt my leaking Power Steering Pump and replaced ALL power steering hoses, December 2017, ~193,000 miles
My power steering pump had been seeping through the main body seals for a while now, making a real mess of the side of the engine. So when I finally got around to rebuilding the thing I also decided to replace the hoses since one or two of the ends had started seeping fluid. The lower rear hose is a REAL PITA! Laying across the top of the engine while reaching down to the steering rack gets tiring really fast. And getting those clamps and ten year old hoses off is a real chore. But it's done now, and it doesn't leak a drop!

Code:
[SIZE="3"][B]Number		Part					Cost[/B]
91370-SV4-000	O-RING (14.4X1.9)			$ 0.76
91048-P2A-003	BEARING, RADIAL BALL (17X40X12)		$10.28
91347-P2A-003	O-RING (15.2X2.4)			$ 0.39
91347-PAA-A01	O-RING (16.7X1.8)			$ 0.60
91348-P2A-003	O-RING (51.0X2.4)			$ 0.84
91349-P2A-003	SEAL, POWER STEERING PUMP COVER		$22.75
91249-PNC-003	SEAL, POWER STEERING PUMP		$ 3.94
53731-SDB-A00	TUBE, SUCTION				$12.70
53732-SDB-A01	HOSE, OIL COOLER			$ 4.64
53733-SDA-A01	HOSE, OIL TANK				$ 5.27
53734-SDB-A01	HOSE, POWER STEERING RETURN		$11.04
91345-RDA-A01	O-RING (13.0X1.9)			$ 0.53
08206-9002	FLUID, P.S.				$ 5.88 (2)[/SIZE]
Replaced my Accessory Belt Tensioner, February 2018, ~195,000 miles
As I mentioned earlier, my accessory belt system had been making some noise, and it had gotten enough worse that I was pretty sure that it was the tensioner. So, I replaced it.

Continental Elite 49349 Accu-Drive Tensioner Assembly, $60 from Amazon

Swapped out my 6-Speed Transmission, May 2018, ~196,5000 miles
So, the transmission noise I was experiencing finally got bad enough that I had to do something about it. After some serious searching, I found a replacement transmission in a local yard and picked it up for $950. Unfortunately, the top transmission mount mounting bosses had been poorly repaired, and the transmission mount would not sit flush on the case. After some arguments with the yard owner (including threats to call my credit card company and the BBB to file fraud complaints), he finally agreed to find me a suitable replacement for the same price. The transmission that I installed is from 1HGCM817X5A010744, that as far as I can tell from Internet searches had 121K miles on it. After I realized how much easier replacing all of the PS hoses would have been if I had just waited until I dropped the cradle for this, I decided to replace all of the coolant lines at this time as well. I also replaced the rear motor mount and the rear main seal since I didn't do that when I replaced the clutch at ~115K miles.

Bad Mounting Boss


Weeping Rear Main Seal (Sorry about the image quality...)


The transmission fluid in this tranny was not in great shape. So rather than "flushing"" it with brand new fluid, I decided to reuse my fairly nice transmission fluid by filtering it into this tranny for the first few thousand miles. Then I would drain that out and put in all fresh fluid.

Code:
[SIZE="3"][B]Part			Number				Cost[/B]
Hose A, Water		19521-RCA-A00			$  1.80
Hose B, Water		19522-RCA-A00			$  2.75
Hose C, Water		19523-RCA-A00			$  3.26
Hose A, Water Inlet	79721-SDB-A60			$  7.93
Hose B, Water Inlet	79722-SDA-A00			$  2.83
Hose Water Outlet	79725-SDB-A60			$ 13.32
Motor Mount, Rear	50810-SDP-A11			$152.18
Oil Seal (80X98X8)	91214-RCA-A01			$ 15.27
Oil Seal (35X54X8)	91206-P0Z-005			$  8.38
Oil Seal (40X56X9)	91205-P0X-005			$ 11.91
PT Auto Warehouse R126 - Radiator Cap, 16 PSI		[URL="https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NWT66CM/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1"]$  8 on Amazon[/URL][/SIZE]
Drain and Fill of Transmission Fluid, July 2018, ~197,000 miles
As I mentioned earlier, after running my lightly used tranny fluid for a little while I decided it was time to drain and put in fresh fluid. I'm really glad that I did as this stuff still looked pretty bad. Although I didn't notice any change in shifting between the old dark fluid and the new stuff.

ACDelco 10-4014 Friction Modified Synchromesh Manual Transmission Fluid - 32 oz, $40 for 2 quarts from Amazon

Tranny fluid after ~2k miles in "New" Transmission


New Tires!!, July 2018, ~197,000 miles
I love getting new tires. I just associate that new tire smell with improved traction, and more fun in the car. :) I got a set of Pirelli P Zero Nero GT in 235/45-18. Total cost with installation and disposal fees was $583 after $70 rebate at Discount Tire. Not too bad...

I haven't had a chance to really thrash on them to test them out, but one of my initial impressions is that the turn-in response is not nearly as good as it was on my previous set of Bridgestone Potenza S-04 Pole Position XL. Of course the Pirellis were more than $25 per tire cheaper, so I guess I can't complain too much.

Painted Windshield Wiper Arms and Cowl Plastic and Got New Windshield, July 2018, ~197,000 miles
My faded windshield wiper arms and cowl plastic have been bothering me for a while now. It was bad enough that anyone walking by could see it, but I could see the wiper arms every time I drove my car. I bought some trim paint several months ago knowing that I wanted to do this. When I got another bad rock chip in the windshield that was the catalyst that made me decide it was time to take care of all of this at once. I pulled the wipe arms and cowl and then scheduled to have the windshield replaced while those parts were out. (That much less chance they get broken by guys rushing to get the window replaced as quickly as they can.) I sanded the wiper arms with 400 grit paper to get the chalky paint off and get them roughed up a bit for the paint. I washed the cowl with soap and water in my bathtub (the wife was not a huge fan of this, but she knows I clean up after my craziness). Then I wiped down all of the parts with paint thinner to remove any dirt or oils. I painted the arms with the black trim paint and I painted the cowl with black Plasti Dip. The Plasti Dip came out with a little bit rougher of a texture than I expected, but I'm not sure if that's how it's supposed to look or if it was just because it was my first time with this product. Either way, it looks WAY better now.

SEM 39143 Trim Black Aerosol - 15 oz, $14 on Amazon
Performix 11203 Plasti Dip Black Multi-Purpose Rubber Coating Aerosol - 11 oz, $6 from Home Depot

Overview Shot


Driver's Wiper Arm


Passenger's Wiper Arm


Cowl Closeup
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
How did you set the pressure plate tension (pressure) without the special tool that is $1000?
The clutch pressure plate is self-adjusting, so I don't think it's purpose is to set the tension. The tension is pretty much fixed by the springs used. After doing a TON of research, I came to the conclusion that the tool is not as necessary as the manual leads you to believe. I read a few threads of guys who did the job without the tool and did not have any problems. The main thing that I heard was that you have to be very careful to install the pressure plate bolts evenly just a little bit at a time. I've done it twice now (installed new clutch at 119K mi and reinstalled it after the tranny swap at ~197K mi), and haven't noticed any problems with it yet. I also measured the clutch material thickness when I had it out, and the thickness was still within the "New" clutch window. Unfortunately I didn't actually measure the thickness of my new unit when I put it in to know exactly how much it has worn in those 78K miles.
 

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The clutch pressure plate is self-adjusting, so I don't think it's purpose is to set the tension. The tension is pretty much fixed by the springs used. After doing a TON of research, I came to the conclusion that the tool is not as necessary as the manual leads you to believe. I read a few threads of guys who did the job without the tool and did not have any problems. The main thing that I heard was that you have to be very careful to install the pressure plate bolts evenly just a little bit at a time. I've done it twice now (installed new clutch at 119K mi and reinstalled it after the tranny swap at ~197K mi), and haven't noticed any problems with it yet. I also measured the clutch material thickness when I had it out, and the thickness was still within the "New" clutch window. Unfortunately I didn't actually measure the thickness of my new unit when I put it in to know exactly how much it has worn in those 78K miles.
There is someone (I forget their name) who says that the LUK clutch set doesn't come pre-set with the correct tension, and it needs to be set. Is this the kit you used? Did you change the tension prior to installation or leave as is from the box?
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
There is someone (I forget their name) who says that the LUK clutch set doesn't come pre-set with the correct tension, and it needs to be set. Is this the kit you used? Did you change the tension prior to installation or leave as is from the box?
Yes, I used the "OEM" LUK clutch kit (08-047). Now that you mention it, I do recall reading about someone saying that you should max out the adjustment of the LUK clutch pressure plate before installing it, so I did. I used a 3-jaw gear puller from Harbor Freight and a modified throwout bearing to compress the pressure plate (see picture 4). But, I wonder if that was really necessary on a new set. The manual specifically says that the self-adjusting part of the clutch is there just to adjust the clutch PEDAL load (pedal feel) as the clutch wears. It does not change the pressure put on the clutch disk. I'm no expert, but here is what I saw/learned.

You can see in the series of pictures below how the clutch adjustment spring varies under different pressure and wear conditions. I'm assuming that the notches in the pressure plate next to the adjustment springs represent new, and "worn" conditions. If you compare picture 1 and 2 you can see that the old pressure plate was within the acceptable range when still on the car, but moved to outside of the range just by removing it from the car. And you can see in picture 5 that the adjustment goes all the way to the maximum "worn" position if you compress the pressure plate while off the car the way I did. (I guess this makes sense since there is no pressure against the friction disk the way I did it on the used one.)

If you compare the pictures of the 119K (number 2) and 78K (number 8) pressure plates after being removed from the car, the position of the indicator does not very closely represent the amount of wear I could actually see on the clutch disks (old one shown in number 3, but I didn't get a picture of the 78K disk as it didn't visibly show any wear). But just the amount of movement in the adjustment spring that happens when removing it from the car makes me wonder if I should have recompressed the used one when I put it back the last time. But I guess since I didn't notice any significant difference in pedal feel, the change was not enough to matter.

1 - Old 119K miles pressure plate before being removed.


2 - Old 119K miles pressure plate after being removed.


3 - Old 119K miles clutch disk.


4 - Old 119K miles pressure plate compressed.


5 - Old 119K miles pressure plate after being compressed.


6 - New pressure plate right out of the box.


7 - New pressure plate after being compressed and having the adjustment ring compressed as much as possible.


8 - "New" pressure plate after 78K miles, removed from the car.
 

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Yes, I used the "OEM" LUK clutch kit (08-047). Now that you mention it, I do recall reading about someone saying that you should max out the adjustment of the LUK clutch pressure plate before installing it, so I did. I used a 3-jaw gear puller from Harbor Freight and a modified throwout bearing to compress the pressure plate (see picture 4). But, I wonder if that was really necessary on a new set. The manual specifically says that the self-adjusting part of the clutch is there just to adjust the clutch PEDAL load (pedal feel) as the clutch wears. It does not change the pressure put on the clutch disk. I'm no expert, but here is what I saw/learned.

You can see in the series of pictures below how the clutch adjustment spring varies under different pressure and wear conditions. I'm assuming that the notches in the pressure plate next to the adjustment springs represent new, and "worn" conditions. If you compare picture 1 and 2 you can see that the old pressure plate was within the acceptable range when still on the car, but moved to outside of the range just by removing it from the car. And you can see in picture 5 that the adjustment goes all the way to the maximum "worn" position if you compress the pressure plate while off the car the way I did. (I guess this makes sense since there is no pressure against the friction disk the way I did it on the used one.)

If you compare the pictures of the 119K (number 2) and 78K (number 8) pressure plates after being removed from the car, the position of the indicator does not very closely represent the amount of wear I could actually see on the clutch disks (old one shown in number 3, but I didn't get a picture of the 78K disk as it didn't visibly show any wear). But just the amount of movement in the adjustment spring that happens when removing it from the car makes me wonder if I should have recompressed the used one when I put it back the last time. But I guess since I didn't notice any significant difference in pedal feel, the change was not enough to matter.

1 - Old 119K miles pressure plate before being removed.


2 - Old 119K miles pressure plate after being removed.


3 - Old 119K miles clutch disk.


4 - Old 119K miles pressure plate compressed.


5 - Old 119K miles pressure plate after being compressed.


6 - New pressure plate right out of the box.


7 - New pressure plate after being compressed and having the adjustment ring compressed as much as possible.


8 - "New" pressure plate after 78K miles, removed from the car.
Can you detail how you set the correct tension on the pressure plate prior to installation?
 

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You will get chunks of carbon in the EGR valve. There is a picture somewhere with somebody from acurazine.net who removed the entire water passage, which includes the EGR passage. That entire area is caked with carbon deposits. It is the exhaust return so I'm not surprised. If you didn't replace the EGR valve, but just cleaned it, it will happen again. I just replaced mine with one from Standard Motor, which works perfectly at the fraction of the OEM unit's price.

Did you happen to have any trouble removing the wiper arms? Because my driver's side arm is NOT budging whatsoever no matter what I tried. Tapping with hammer while prying with a pry bar. I bought a wiper arm removal tool but it did not fit whatsoever. I was removing the 6-6 strut bar and was going to remove the driver's side wiper arm, but not a chance. I ended up just sliding the cowl out of the way so I could get to the bolts. I didn't want to damage the windshield. That cowl and wiper arms finish look awesome, I would love to do the same. But my arms don't look half as bad as your before condition.

That rear power steering hose was a real pain wasn't it?! haha! I spent most of the time getting the side by the rear of the engine off and on. So you replace the bearing in the pump? I just installed a new pump and will be rebuilding mine, including a new bearing. But I won't be using the OEM NSK bearing, I will use a Nachi bearing instead. Good job on the rebuild! But your rebuild cost about $74, I bought a rebuilt pump with brand new Japanese NSK bearing for $62. So unless you are really into rebuilding things, I'd recommend anyone else just buying a new pump and transfer the pulley and low pressure tube over. I just noticed the pump cover seal somehow jumped in massive price to $23. That used to cost less than $20
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Can you detail how you set the correct tension on the pressure plate prior to installation?
As shown in picture5, I modified the throwout bearing by cutting the ears off of it so I could put it on the spring fingers upside down. This keeps it centered on the fingers when compressing it. As I pointed out before, when I compressed the pressure plate off of the car (as shown in picture 4), it relieved the tension on the self adjusting mechanism, and it went out to full "worn" position. To set it to the full "new" position, just compress the pressure plate as I did, and then use a screwdriver to rotate the self adjusting mechanism counter-clockwise to compress the springs. And while holding the springs compressed, release the compression on the pressure plate and it will hold the adjustment mechanism in place. I found this short YouTube video that shows somebody doing essentially the same thing. They just have a fancy press to do it with.

 

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Ordered my clutch and flywheel from Rockauto.com. My clutch is fine in my 4 door 06' V6, but my rear main seal is leaking so gotta fix that.

I've done clutches and transmissions in Honda/Toyota cars before, but this job has me scared for some reason. Any tips or pointers would be appreciated.

New parts on order from Honda:
Flywheel and pressure plate bolts
Rear main seal
O Ring behind the oil plate
Exhaust nuts / bolts
Throw out bearing
Hondabond

Anything else?
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Some people recommended I replace the pilot bearing, but mine felt good and was a pain to remove, so I didn't. I also replaced the clutch release fork and pivot bolt because they were cheap. You should at least inspect them when you get it apart. You should get some of Honda's high temp urea grease and some thread lock compound.

Other things to think about while you have the subframe out are your power steering and coolant hoses. I would definitely replace the one power steering hose that runs along the back of the subframe and then up the passenger's side. That one was HARD to install with the subframe in the car, but would have been simple with it out.

Also, if you're even considering upgrading to the TL or TL-S front sway bar, this is also the time to do that.

Good luck!
 

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Some people recommended I replace the pilot bearing, but mine felt good and was a pain to remove, so I didn't. I also replaced the clutch release fork and pivot bolt because they were cheap. You should at least inspect them when you get it apart. You should get some of Honda's high temp urea grease and some thread lock compound.

Other things to think about while you have the subframe out are your power steering and coolant hoses. I would definitely replace the one power steering hose that runs along the back of the subframe and then up the passenger's side. That one was HARD to install with the subframe in the car, but would have been simple with it out.

Also, if you're even considering upgrading to the TL or TL-S front sway bar, this is also the time to do that.

Good luck!
The power steering line going from the rack to the hard line running down the passenger side of the subframe?

That's interesting that you replaced your clutch release fork and pivot bolt. I've never seen a broken one. I'll replace those as well as the clip and boot.

Doesn't the new flywheel come with a new pilot bearing?
 

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Some people recommended I replace the pilot bearing, but mine felt good and was a pain to remove, so I didn't. I also replaced the clutch release fork and pivot bolt because they were cheap. You should at least inspect them when you get it apart. You should get some of Honda's high temp urea grease and some thread lock compound.

Other things to think about while you have the subframe out are your power steering and coolant hoses. I would definitely replace the one power steering hose that runs along the back of the subframe and then up the passenger's side. That one was HARD to install with the subframe in the car, but would have been simple with it out.

Also, if you're even considering upgrading to the TL or TL-S front sway bar, this is also the time to do that.

Good luck!
The new flywheel come with a new pilot bearing?
 

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Just finished my clutch. Plenty left on the old one. Rear main was leaking. Man this was a hard job. Not for the faint hearted. Like an idiot I forgot to use brake clean on the flywheel and pressure plate. What am I in for?
 
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