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I know that the recommended tire pressure for the Sport Sedan is 33 front and 32 back, but is it ok to notch it up by 1 on all 4s? I know it will help with the fuel economy.

What do you guys normally put in?
 

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I know that the recommended tire pressure for the Sport Sedan is 33 front and 32 back, but is it ok to notch it up by 1 on all 4s? I know it will help with the fuel economy.

What do you guys normally put in?
Why would you want to notch it up (or down) against manufacturer pressure recommendation? And how do you know it'll save you gas?
 
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every brand and size perform different . Do you own testing just make sure you start with a cold set of tires and see what works for you. On my 235/45/18 I run them at 38psi all the way around
 

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the sedan is 33/32? The coupe is 33 all around. I keep them at 34.
 

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so if I pump them up a few psi I will ruin my tires? What have you based this conclusion on?
You won't "ruin" them per-se, but you will shorten their life. They are suppose to run with a calculated/designed pressure and if you over-inflate or under-infalte it shortens their life, it causes the car to be outside it's handling characteristics and you save no gas whatsoever.
That is, of course, assuming we are talking about normal road driving conditions, not off-road, extreme driving, racing, etc.
 

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Not really. Not sure why anyone play with tire pressure that was specifically designed for a specific car. Your gas savings are non-existing or minimal at best, but you'll shorten your tires' life and also compromise car stability and safety.
Incorrect on all counts.
 

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Not really. Not sure why anyone play with tire pressure that was specifically designed for a specific car. Your gas savings are non-existing or minimal at best, but you'll shorten your tires' life and also compromise car stability and safety.
You are wrong.

Over inflation decreases wear.
MPG savings when inflated higher can be significant, but could be at the expense of decreased traction, handling, and ride comfort- but not necessarily.

As others have stated, the manufacturer's recommendations are a balanced compromise between safety, ride comfort, handling, fuel economy, tire life, and traction. Over inflation or under inflation can change that balance based upon the driver's desires.

And even in each of the above categories(safety, handling, traction, tire life, mpg, ride comfort) changing pressure can have both negative and a positive factors in each category at the same time.

Additionally, the manufacturers recommendations are based on an averaged cargo load. Your tires and car will behave differently if you have, say, one small adult female driving the car with no passengers or cargo, vs 5 large adult males and a trunk full of luggage.
 
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