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How often do you guys rotate tires and is there a certain method/pattern you follow each time?

And about how long should the factory tires last us? In miles that is.
 

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How often do you guys rotate tires and is there a certain method/pattern you follow each time?

And about how long should the factory tires last us? In miles that is.
I do an oil change and tire rotation at 7500 miles. I have two sets of tires: winter and regular. Winter set gets rotated every year and they are directional so I can only do up and down. The winter tires are marked with either "1" or "2" so odd year December "1" tires go to the front and "2' go to the rear and so forth. The regular set gets rotated twice a year and I only do up and down. I put stickers on the wheel to remind myself which tires go to the front and rear when it is time for the winter tires.

5000 miles is just too soon and 10,000 miles just too late based on my past experiences. My original Firestone Affinity had about 40% left when I got rid of them at 25,000 miles so those would have been good until 40,000 miles or so. It depends on your driving condition. HWY is easy on tires.
 

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How often do you guys rotate tires and is there a certain method/pattern you follow each time?
Some do it every 5,000 miles. Some do it every oil change. Depends on what's convenient. I personally rotate about every 5,000 miles.

Rotation pattern? That depends on the tires.



If you have directional tires, then you are only suppose to rotate them in a straight pattern (figure D). This means front left to back left, front right to back right, back left to front left, and back right to front right.

If you have non-directional tires and they're of different sizes front and back, then you should only rotate them side to side (figure E).

If you have directional tires and they're different sizes front and back, then you shouldn't rotate at all.

If you have non-directional tires of the same size, you can rotate them in a straight pattern (figure D) front to back and back to front, or (figure A) a straight pattern where the front go to the back and the rear are crossed when going up front.


And about how long should the factory tires last us? In miles that is.
Too many factors affect tread life.... how you drive (acceleration, braking, corning), the roads driven on, weather conditions, city vs highway, tire pressure, cargo load, etc.

If you're always stepping on the gas, trying to get to the next stop light faster than anyone else, then you'll wear out your tires quicker than normal.

If you're constantly driving through the hot desert, then you can wear out your tires quicker.

If you mostly drive on roads made out of smooth asphalt, then your tires will last longer than if you mostly drive on roads made out of crushed stone, shells, or coral. Florida roads are suppose to be pretty harsh on tires because they're made out of shells and coral.
 

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We used to include the spare tire in the rotation back in the day when the manufacturers furnished them. Now the cheapskates no longer furnish them, just another sign of inflation at work for you. Same price just give us a donut or even worse a can of flat fix. They don't even leave enough room to add one if you so desire. Please pardon the rant from an old man who misses the things of my past.

I do have a real spare in my Solara and my Frontier. Nissan even included a matching alloy wheel as a spare.
 

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We used to include the spare tire in the rotation back in the day when the manufacturers furnished them. Now the cheapskates no longer furnish them, just another sign of inflation at work for you. Same price just give us a donut or even worse a can of flat fix. They don't even leave enough room to add one if you so desire. Please pardon the rant from an old man who misses the things of my past.

I do have a real spare in my Solara and my Frontier. Nissan even included a matching alloy wheel as a spare.
I have my full size alloy spare on my wrangler rotated into the mix with my rotations. I had a local Firestone coupon for a free tire rotation and they wanted to charge me $10 for the 5th wheel! They threw it in upon valid argument calling them out on their BS. Still, I'll never go back. Great program to get people in and show them you're scam artists!
 

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Some do it every 5,000 miles. Some do it every oil change. Depends on what's convenient. I personally rotate about every 5,000 miles.

Rotation pattern? That depends on the tires.



If you have directional tires, then you are only suppose to rotate them in a straight pattern (figure D). This means front left to back left, front right to back right, back left to front left, and back right to front right.

If you have non-directional tires and they're of different sizes front and back, then you should only rotate them side to side (figure E).

If you have directional tires and they're different sizes front and back, then you shouldn't rotate at all.

If you have non-directional tires of the same size, you can rotate them in a straight pattern (figure D) front to back and back to front, or (figure A) a straight pattern where the front go to the back and the rear are crossed when going up front.




Too many factors affect tread life.... how you drive (acceleration, braking, corning), the roads driven on, weather conditions, city vs highway, tire pressure, cargo load, etc.

If you're always stepping on the gas, trying to get to the next stop light faster than anyone else, then you'll wear out your tires quicker than normal.

If you're constantly driving through the hot desert, then you can wear out your tires quicker.

If you mostly drive on roads made out of smooth asphalt, then your tires will last longer than if you mostly drive on roads made out of crushed stone, shells, or coral. Florida roads are suppose to be pretty harsh on tires because they're made out of shells and coral.
Thanks for this detailed explanation, Brother! Much appreciated.
 

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I had a local Firestone coupon for a free tire rotation
For those who rely on tire stores to do their tire rotations, make sure they torque your lug nuts. Honda wheel studs are really difficult to replace - they are some tricks (i.e., shave half of bolt head) but to do it right you have to take the wheel bearing assembly off. I recently learned this and I thought Honda was easy like Camry but I was wrong. Just be careful over or under torquing the lug nuts.
 

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For those who rely on tire stores to do their tire rotations, make sure they torque your lug nuts. Honda wheel studs are really difficult to replace - they are some tricks (i.e., shave half of bolt head) but to do it right you have to take the wheel bearing assembly off. I recently learned this and I thought Honda was easy like Camry but I was wrong. Just be careful over or under torquing the lug nuts.
+1. Great point. Wal Mart, Sears, and my dealer use a torque wrench. Many do not. Wallys also advises to return in 50 miles to have them retorqued.

Over tightening can also wear out wheel bearings, brakes, and make alloys prone to crack in potholes. It can also make changing a tire impossible because you cant loosen the nuts. Not from lack of strength. I used a an extension rod on my 300E lug wrench and bent the wrench. I was furious and went to the local gas station that installed the snow tires to get them to loosen it and they had to use a breaker bar to loosen. Needless to say, I do my own rotations and check the torque any time i have service done.

Too loose is bad too. Both my dad and brother had corky leave lug nuts loose and dang near killed my dad on the NJ Turnpike. I have gone so far to bring my torque wrench to the shop when I pick it up and let them see me checking it before I take off. I do not trust these guys.

I rotate at about 7500 miles usually front to back since it is easier that cross rotating without a lift.
 

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I do not trust these guys.
You can't trust these guys because you don't know who you are going to get. I recently had a minor body work done and the shop had to take one rear wheel off. When I checked, the shop over torqued the lug nuts to 130-140 ft-lb. I was livid and talked to the shop owner about it. A torque wrench from HF is only $10 so the cost is not the reason - just in a hurry and trying to save 5 minutes.
 

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Front wheel drive cars will eat your front tires if you don't rotate them. The front tires wear faster than rear wheel drive cars because the front wheels are both driving and steering. I take all my Honda cars to the dealer to rotate the tires when I have the oil changed. After I replace the tires I then have them rotated by the tire dealer which is free. A good tire dealer should torque the lug nuts on any car with alloy wheels.
 

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You can't trust these guys because you don't know who you are going to get. I recently had a minor body work done and the shop had to take one rear wheel off. When I checked, the shop over torqued the lug nuts to 130-140 ft-lb. I was livid and talked to the shop owner about it. A torque wrench from HF is only $10 so the cost is not the reason - just in a hurry and trying to save 5 minutes.
Yep, "Corky" is everywhere. How about 400 lbs of torque? I put the extension on my 300E lug wrench and jumped on it which is what bent the wrench.

10TV went to the mall and randomly asked 10 women just to loosen their lug nuts. I am not exaggerating, not a single person could. The point of the story was not that women are weak but rather lug nuts are too tight.

When I have asked the question "do you use a torque wrench and torque the lug nuts to spec." Corky, without a clue, usually looks at me like an Aborigine staring at a Ferris wheel.
 
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