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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Will be installing a lower control arm on my 20113 next weekend and from various videos I've seen a few guys went by torq specs and others didn't.

When doing your repairs do you go by torq specs or just tighten ti'll tight?
 

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If I can get the torque specs, I use them. Some control arm bolts require some substantial torque, that can be hard to achieve with a normal ratchet. Most of the time, guessing will work out fine, but in some instances under-torqueing can lead to things working themselves loose, and over-torqueing leads to stripped bolts/nuts/threads.

PS: With some suspension parts it is required to load the suspension before torqueing the bolts down.
 

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I certainly look up the torque specs, but I admit I treat them as a general guideline rather than an absolute rule (no investment advice). Having a torque wrench is of course the way to go, but if you don't have one it does not necessarily have to mean that your project must be put on hold.

Keeping in mind that the lug nuts are supposed to be 80 ft-lbs; a 40 ft-lbs torque is hand tight. 20 ft-lbs is wrist tight. 6 ft-lbs tells me to finger tight it, and then maybe another quarter turn.

When torque specs are not available (I don't know how they are not available when we have Hanes books and the Internet, but for the sake of argument let's assume they are somehow not):

Bolt size is a good place to start. If it is a 10mm, I avoid going gorilla torque on it.
If I am fitting a fastener on a cast-iron part, I treat it very gently. Similarly, fasteners that hold together forged steel pieces get more torque from me.
Another hint is the shape. Speaking for two different fasteners of same diameter and pitch; one is a phillips head, and the other is a hex head, phillips head is much more prone to getting stripped. It is a common mod to "upgrade" from phillips screws to hex bolts, but it is easy to over-torque a hex bolt that was originally intended as a phillips head. If the bolt is steel and the parts are zinc or some other brittle alloy, there is a risk of breaking the parts. Engineers chose the fastener type with respect to the material the parts are made of.

Need to be careful with fasteners that hold together parts that have a gasket in between. I believe this is one of the situations where it is important to observe the torque spec.
 
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