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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've owned my '21 2.0T Sport for about 3 weeks now. While I absolutely love this car, there is one thing that I can't quite figure out if it's normal or not. The 10 speed is a little herky-jerky at times, especially in the first few gears. It happens under normal acceleration, most noticeably when I take my foot off the gas pedal. It gives a slight hesitation, almost like a clutch pedal being let out a little too fast. It's not horrible by any means, but it's definitely noticeable enough where it has me a little concerned.

The car just hit 20,000 miles (I bought it with 18,400 on it) and I know the recommended fluid drain and refill service interval for the 10 speed is 30,000. I'm almost wondering if I should just go ahead and get that done early to rule out the fluid.

My previous car had an older 5 speed automatic, and when I test drove a Challenger Scat Pack with the 8 speed automatic once, to me it almost had the same sort of feeling, so is that just how modern 8, 9 and 10 speed transmissions feel now-a-days?

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There's nothing wrong with your Accord. That's just how it is. The 10 speed in the Mustang is the same way. The car will feel smoother in eco or normal compared to sport, but there's a little bit of hesitation, studder, jerkiness, whatever word you want to describe it, every now and then. Depends on how much pedal you give it. These transmissions are loaded with computers and monitor everything. Computers do a good job of keeping everything between parameters, but they aren't always the most caring or nurturing. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There's nothing wrong with your Accord. That's just how it is. The 10 speed in the Mustang is the same way. The car will feel smoother in eco or normal compared to sport, but there's a little bit of hesitation, studder, jerkiness, whatever word you want to describe it, every now and then. Depends on how much pedal you give it. These transmissions are loaded with computers and monitor everything. Computers do a good job of keeping everything between parameters, but they aren't always the most caring or nurturing. ;)
Thanks for the reassurance. That's what I was figuring. Would it improve with a tune you think? I'm definitely going with a K-Tuner in the future. Just wondering if I should get it sooner if it'll help with that?
 

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I bought my 2.0 new in Oct of 2020 and I felt like the transmission smoothed out over time. I believe these transmissions are designed to adapt to your driving style. I had never heard 30k on trans fluid drain and fill. I'm planning on doing it myself @ 50 k.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I bought my 2.0 new in Oct of 2020 and I felt like the transmission smoothed out over time. I believe these transmissions are designed to adapt to your driving style. I had never heard 30k on trans fluid drain and fill. I'm planning on doing it myself @ 50 k.
That's good to know. I had a feeling it was just something I'd have to adjust to. The 30k mile drain and fill is what I've seen posted a lot, but I don't believe it's in the manual.
 

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I've owned my '21 2.0T Sport for about 3 weeks now. While I absolutely love this car, there is one thing that I can't quite figure out if it's normal or not. The 10 speed is a little herky-jerky at times, especially in the first few gears. It happens under normal acceleration, most noticeably when I take my foot off the gas pedal. It gives a slight hesitation, almost like a clutch pedal being let out a little too fast. It's not horrible by any means, but it's definitely noticeable enough where it has me a little concerned.

The car just hit 20,000 miles (I bought it with 18,400 on it) and I know the recommended fluid drain and refill service interval for the 10 speed is 30,000. I'm almost wondering if I should just go ahead and get that done early to rule out the fluid.

My previous car had an older 5 speed automatic, and when I test drove a Challenger Scat Pack with the 8 speed automatic once, to me it almost had the same sort of feeling, so is that just how modern 8, 9 and 10 speed transmissions feel now-a-days?
This is a common problem reported with the transmission. Please see prior threads.
If this happens between 2nd and 3rd gear, RPM seems to increase and the car then jerks while shifting gears - then it is a transmission fault.

I had a similar thing and got my transmission replaced. However, the dealer screwed up the install and the now the engine knocks and makes all kinds of weird noises. Some folks have had better luck though.

In my case transmission fluid change and flush didn't help. You can try if that works. If not you will have to live with it, or see if you want to risk the dealer replacing the transmission (assuming Honda tech tells them to do so).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This is a common problem reported with the transmission. Please see prior threads.
If this happens between 2nd and 3rd gear, RPM seems to increase and the car then jerks while shifting gears - then it is a transmission fault.

I had a similar thing and got my transmission replaced. However, the dealer screwed up the install and the now the engine knocks and makes all kinds of weird noises. Some folks have had better luck though.

In my case transmission fluid change and flush didn't help. You can try if that works. If not you will have to live with it, or see if you want to risk the dealer replacing the transmission (assuming Honda tech tells them to do so).
Thanks. Yes, I read about the 2-3 gear hard shifting, but that's not what I described, so it's not the same issue. There are no rising RPMs and it not shifting and then slamming into gear. This is more when letting off the gas pedal and the car jerking very slightly.

I had someone recently tell me that newer cars have torque converters that lock up more than older transmissions so they do have a jerking like characteristic to them at times. That's more in line with what I'm experiencing.
 

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I think its Normal on Honda. Have an 8th gen now and have had that tranny kick since day one. Used to think when is the transmission going to give up and am now at 200k miles. There is one thing that I do get on this Honda tranny and on my MDX and that’s a sound that is hard to explain but sounds like sounds like an electronic whirring sound mixed with grinding metal that comes from transmission on third gear. Some call it a whining noise. I don’t understand why it’s there but doesn’t seem to be an issue.
 

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This is a common problem reported with the transmission. Please see prior threads.
If this happens between 2nd and 3rd gear, RPM seems to increase and the car then jerks while shifting gears - then it is a transmission fault.

I had a similar thing and got my transmission replaced. However, the dealer screwed up the install and the now the engine knocks and makes all kinds of weird noises. Some folks have had better luck though.

In my case transmission fluid change and flush didn't help. You can try if that works. If not you will have to live with it, or see if you want to risk the dealer replacing the transmission (assuming Honda tech tells them to do so).
So you exchanged a small problem for a big problem? That stinks! This is one of the reasons why I don't go to the dealership unless the car either doesn't drive at all or a major component like the AC broke (blowing hot air). Cars are complicated to fix these days in the name of efficiency, creature comforts, power, monitoring, etc. There are thousands of fasteners holding this transmission together. The tech is bound to miss something. Just hopefully something that is less important. If a car is worked on at the dealership, chances are it won't be as good as the person/machine who originally assembled it at the factory.

I think I'll be holding on to my '96 Jeep XJ forever. Or at least as long as I can afford to put gas in it. The XJ was built in a simpler time where it was easy to repair if something broke. Not many creature comforts, but has also never left me stranded. Currently has about 220k miles on it and purrs like a cat.
 

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I'm planning on doing it myself @ 50 k.
Just had mine done at 50k several days ago and it's a big difference. Bought the car ('18 2.0T Touring) in June 2021 with 37k, and I've noticed it getting a little jerkier in the last few months. Nice and buttery again now (in comparison).
 

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I think I'll be holding on to my '96 Jeep XJ forever. Or at least as long as I can afford to put gas in it. The XJ was built in a simpler time where it was easy to repair if something broke.
It’s funny you say that because in 1996 many talked about how cars were too complicated, and that cars built in an earlier, simpler time were easier to repair.
 

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So you exchanged a small problem for a big problem? That stinks! This is one of the reasons why I don't go to the dealership unless the car either doesn't drive at all or a major component like the AC broke (blowing hot air). Cars are complicated to fix these days in the name of efficiency, creature comforts, power, monitoring, etc. There are thousands of fasteners holding this transmission together. The tech is bound to miss something. Just hopefully something that is less important. If a car is worked on at the dealership, chances are it won't be as good as the person/machine who originally assembled it at the factory.

I think I'll be holding on to my '96 Jeep XJ forever. Or at least as long as I can afford to put gas in it. The XJ was built in a simpler time where it was easy to repair if something broke. Not many creature comforts, but has also never left me stranded. Currently has about 220k miles on it and purrs like a cat.
I couldn't agree more with you. Unfortunately, I read on this forum about some people who had transmission replacements and were really happy. I didn't think of the dealer screwing up the installation.

First time I got the car after the transmission change, the turbo stopped working. And then it started making clunking noises while shifting and the dashboard lit up with all the warnings you could think of. Had to be towed (at my expense) to the dealership.

They said the intercooler pipe came off and some other turbo issue. Got the car back, but it again started to have a lot of turbo lag, made whistling sounds of engine/turbo noise, started to knock at low rpms, fuel economy completely tanked and so did the power. Took it in again. The dealer folks said they checked everything and vehicle is functioning normally.

I've sort of given up, and waiting for an opportune time to sell the car and get something else.

Moral of the story: Car was flawless out of the factory with great power and fuel economy, except the transmission jerking. In trying to get the transmission fixed, dealer botched the rest of the car. So basically I agree, better to live with minor quibbles. Just avoid risk of getting major screw-ups with repair work done by dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just had mine done at 50k several days ago and it's a big difference. Bought the car ('18 2.0T Touring) in June 2021 with 37k, and I've noticed it getting a little jerkier in the last few months. Nice and buttery again now (in comparison).
That's good to know. I'll probably just go ahead and get mine done early to see if it makes a difference.
 

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May I add, that AT fluid change at 30k is important. I bought my 8th gen with 48k miles, and at 50k it had a judder in 2nd geat. Fluid change stopped it. I have 159k miles and it is the smoothest, most dependable AT in my experience. Never flush a Honda AT.
 
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it does seem to be normal as almost everyone reports the same feeling. ive noticed that when i dont drive for a couple days it seems to feel better. my theory is the transmission tries to adapt to your driving. if you drive slow and casually for a while then try to switch it up with harder accelerations, the computer tries to adjust to predict your behavior and this results in weird jerkiness as it tries to keep the car ready for accelerating. why i think it feels better after a few days of not driving, the computers go into sleep mode and i think it might 'reset' the transmission computer so that it has to learn your driving style again. it takes some 'gaming' of the throttle to try to ease the jerkiness. for example i will keep the slightest amount of throttle possible instead of completely letting go of throttle if i am needing to slow down or coast slightly. when i let go of throttle on a downhill, the momentum seems to be enough that it doesnt jerk. its kind of annoying tbh but not a dealbreaker. definitely makes me wish it was a manual sometimes. ultimately i think it just comes down to trying to drive like an NPC in low speed areas. when you beat on it on the highway, the car has no trouble at all transmitting that power so it makes me think the transmission is fine. people tune these cars to like 400-500hp and dont do anything to the transmission, so it seems to be beefy enough of a transmission that its not getting hurt by these low speed jerks. idk. i still got 2 years on that powertrain warranty so ill continue to drive it hard and if it breaks in those 2 years ill be covered. lol. ill probs change trans fluid at 30k though.
 

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it does seem to be normal as almost everyone reports the same feeling. ive noticed that when i dont drive for a couple days it seems to feel better. my theory is the transmission tries to adapt to your driving. if you drive slow and casually for a while then try to switch it up with harder accelerations, the computer tries to adjust to predict your behavior and this results in weird jerkiness as it tries to keep the car ready for accelerating. why i think it feels better after a few days of not driving, the computers go into sleep mode and i think it might 'reset' the transmission computer so that it has to learn your driving style again. it takes some 'gaming' of the throttle to try to ease the jerkiness. for example i will keep the slightest amount of throttle possible instead of completely letting go of throttle if i am needing to slow down or coast slightly. when i let go of throttle on a downhill, the momentum seems to be enough that it doesnt jerk. its kind of annoying tbh but not a dealbreaker. definitely makes me wish it was a manual sometimes. ultimately i think it just comes down to trying to drive like an NPC in low speed areas. when you beat on it on the highway, the car has no trouble at all transmitting that power so it makes me think the transmission is fine. people tune these cars to like 400-500hp and dont do anything to the transmission, so it seems to be beefy enough of a transmission that its not getting hurt by these low speed jerks. idk. i still got 2 years on that powertrain warranty so ill continue to drive it hard and if it breaks in those 2 years ill be covered. lol. ill probs change trans fluid at 30k though.
I absolutely agree with your premise of the trans adapting to your driving style. I don't know about all of the inner workings of the transmission, but my car for sure smoothed out as I drove it from new. I am the only driver of the car and my transmission drives very smooth.
 

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It’s funny you say that because in 1996 many talked about how cars were too complicated, and that cars built in an earlier, simpler time were easier to repair.
True, and that cycle will repeat every several decades I presume. The only difference is, older vehicles rust away, newer vehicles are designed to be disposable. A fairly minor collision has the ability to total a vehicle these days. Mainly because of the material construction of newer vehicles. Manufacturers use lightweight materials to keep weight down, but then have to figure out how to make a vehicle perform well in a crash test. Because of the way a vehicle protects the occupants inside, it also takes more damage meaning a more likelihood that it becomes totaled.

We are talking pre-pandemic here though. The value of a vehicle has gone up dramatically so insurance companies aren't so total happy.
 

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I've owned my '21 2.0T Sport for about 3 weeks now. While I absolutely love this car, there is one thing that I can't quite figure out if it's normal or not. The 10 speed is a little herky-jerky at times, especially in the first few gears. It happens under normal acceleration, most noticeably when I take my foot off the gas pedal. It gives a slight hesitation, almost like a clutch pedal being let out a little too fast. It's not horrible by any means, but it's definitely noticeable enough where it has me a little concerned.

The car just hit 20,000 miles (I bought it with 18,400 on it) and I know the recommended fluid drain and refill service interval for the 10 speed is 30,000. I'm almost wondering if I should just go ahead and get that done early to rule out the fluid.

My previous car had an older 5 speed automatic, and when I test drove a Challenger Scat Pack with the 8 speed automatic once, to me it almost had the same sort of feeling, so is that just how modern 8, 9 and 10 speed transmissions feel now-a-days?

View attachment 539909
Mine did 132,000 km and no big issues so far other than once I changed the fluid at a workshop and the mechanic didn't fill it up well which resulted in a weird tranny behaviour, filled up the next day it was all good since then. Others say yours will smooth out with time and I agree with them.

I bought my 2.0 new in Oct of 2020 and I felt like the transmission smoothed out over time. I believe these transmissions are designed to adapt to your driving style. I had never heard 30k on trans fluid drain and fill. I'm planning on doing it myself @ 50 k.
When you want to fill it up, I advise you to screw in the check-level's plug until you are done, warm up the engine do the tranny shifting and then open the plug and check. If you leave it unplugged while filling, you may get the fluid dripping out thinking it's level and it may not be because the fill plug is right above the check-level plug.
 
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