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Discussion Starter #1
So I've been driving my 2004 Honda Accord Couple 4cyl for 3 months now. I bought it at 110K miles and I'm at 116K now. The owner's manual says to change the transmission fluid at 120,000 miles, and after reading up on numerous tranny failures among seventh gen accords I decided to do mine a bit early. When I checked the fluid before taking it in it looked sort of on the brownish side with a pink tint anyway. Before I took it the car was running smoothly, no leaks, no burning fluids, no noticeable issues.

I put maybe 300 miles since (one week) and last night I noticed that first gear was stuttering a bit so I took it home. When I went in the garage this morning there was a giant puddle of transmission fluid on the ground underneath the front end. It wasn't leaking anymore though. I took it for a spin around the block to try and replicate the leak and sure enough it started dripping from a couple different spots underneath the transmission when I parked it again.

Any reason why it would be leaking so profusely right after a drain and fill? Is it possible that the mechanic botched something or more likely that the transmission is reacting poorly to the d&f? I can't bring it back in until tomorrow but I don't know how much I can trust the mechanic after this. I've only ever done oil changes with him before.
 

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Sorry to hear that.

Yes, there are several ways it can be meshed up. For example: 1) He overtorqued (air tool) and destroyed the threading on the case 2) He undertorqued (not tight enough) 3) He didn't use a new washer or left debris on the mating surfaces 4) He knocked the case and made a dent (happened to me).

Have you checked whether the bolts have been properly torqued?

I wouldn't drive the car with low transmission fluid.
 

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why would you pay someone to do a drain and fill? It's the easiest thing to do.

Did your mechanic use OEM Honda fluid? If not then I weep for the future of your trans.
 

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why would you pay someone to do a drain and fill? It's the easiest thing to do.

Did your mechanic use OEM Honda fluid? If not then I weep for the future of your trans.
^ this times eleventy-billion. i got a buck says the monkey use something other than honda dw1 in it.



OP - all the reading you did, did you happen to come across a how-to on changing your own ATF? it's WAY easy. you don't even need to jack the car up. seriously bro. and next time you do a lot of reading about the ton of Honda AT failures, pay attention to which engine and transmission. by and large, it was the 03-05 V6 AT cars with problems.
 

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The most important things to be sure of when you change your transmission fluid:

1) Use ONLY Honda ATF-DW1
2) Make sure the crush washer is replaced
3) Do not underfill or overfill; run car for a few minutes on flat ground, then shut engine off and check the level within 90 seconds. Honda recommends not checking it with the engine running.


As others have said, ATF changes on Hondas are about as easy as it gets for maintenance. I'm not exaggerating when I say that ATF changes on the 7th gen Accords are easier than oil changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, it looks like the source of the leak is coming from the drain plug.

OP - all the reading you did, did you happen to come across a how-to on changing your own ATF? it's WAY easy. you don't even need to jack the car up. seriously bro.
Because I don't have a ratchet set and I live in an apartment complex.
 

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I'd drain it and then refill with three quarts of DW-1 HONDA fluid.
 

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Because I don't have a ratchet set and I live in an apartment complex.
Buy one, go change it somewhere else? Cheaper than a mechanic, especially after this. Understand that your transmission IS now damaged and moreover, probably filled with the wrong fluid. I'd go drain it 3x3 with Honda DW1 and replace the crush washer too.
 

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"A little knowledge is a dangerous thing". You knew enough to do "something", but the execution was all wrong.

1) When you buy a used car- change each and every fluid immediately.
2) As Drew mentioned, you go to a Honda dealer now and buy 9 quarts of DW-1. You will now have to do 3 drain and fill procedures. Get 3 new crush washers too.
3) Get a new ATF filter and change that too. You are a newbie, so just get the Honda one from the dealer.

As everyone mentioned- this is easy. Did you see the videos or write-ups on how easy this is?

drain pan: $3
funnel: $2
ratchet: Free- borrow the socket set from an auto store's tool loaner program
90 degree long nose pliers: Use this for changing your filter (the auto store may have it for free to loan, or spend $3 at Harbor Freight)

Recycle your used fluid for free at any auto parts store. Don't dump it. Love your Mother Earth!

Don't drive the car until you complete the first drain and fill procedure.

Edit: Loved you in the Spiderman movies, Peter Parker. With great power, comes great responsibility. Change that fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Update: I took everyone's advise and had the transmission fluid drained again and replaced with DW1. I went to the dealership - it was actually half the price of the other shop and I get the piece of mind knowing the correct fluid is in it. It stopped kicking in first gear immediately after I drove it out of there. I admit my ignorance and I am disappoint.

I still expect to be berated for not doing it myself :|
 

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Good for you. The dealer should have replaced the crush washer, but I'd still check the drain plug everyday, at least for a week. You just want to be sure it's not leaking anymore.
 
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