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Of course double-clutching isn't necessary on a modern car. That's what the transmission synchronizers are for, right?

Knowing that your manual transmission vehicle uses synchronizers, you may think there is no point in understanding how to double clutch. There are still specific scenarios, however, where it can be useful...

Like when you're slowing in stop-and-go traffic, and you need to engage 1st gear. Or when you're downshifting from 6th to 4th (or 3rd), for passing slow vehicles on a 2-lane highway.
In my old Corolla, I'd double clutch into 1st because I think that car has no synchro on 1st gear, so you'd grind it unless you are almost completely stopped(below 5km/h or 3mph). I think synchro on 1st gear has become pretty standard soon after that, though. I have driven a friend's 02 Civic Coupe 5-speed and downshifting into 1st didn't grind.

When I pass someone on the highway, I just do it as quickly as possible, so I don't like double clutching as it slows you down.

Overall I think it's like left foot braking. If you can do it well then you can keep doing it, but it's not something I would recommend to anyone.

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Raise your hand if you've properly executed a double-clutch downshift:
-- from 6th gear directly to 3rd gear,
-- at 60 mph,
-- instantly going to full throttle when 3rd is engaged.

I know there's a learning curve. It takes some trial-and-error.

But the first time you get it right, I guarantee it'll put a smile on your face.

And that makes driving a stick-shift FUN.
 

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Raise your hand if you've properly executed a double-clutch downshift:
-- from 6th gear directly to 3rd gear,
-- at 60 mph,
-- instantly going to full throttle when 3rd is engaged.

I know there's a learning curve. It takes some trial-and-error.

But the first time you get it right, I guarantee it'll put a smile on your face.

And that makes driving a stick-shift FUN.
Oh I do 5 to 2 shifts on my current Accord at 80km/h or 50mph at times. Never double clutched and it's still fun. If my car can't get into gear comfortably, time for new fluid!

Like I said, to each of their own. It's like driving manual in general nowadays given the objective superiority of automatic transmissions. If you like it then do it. I don't find double clutching fun or useful personally.

And I don't think double clutching will solve OP's problem here. They aren't having trouble getting in gear, they just struggle to do the upshifting without bucking.

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Change to Amsoil for your transmission. Do a search for the benefits and user experience after draining Honda manual transmission fluid (which is very good) and refilling with Amsoil synchro transmission fluid. You'll find a lot of Honda owners have made the switch after dealing with shifting issues and report good results.
I did this with my 2014, it did not seem to change the feel compared to Honda MTF. I also get occasional grinds going into 2nd, this has been an issue on all 3 of my manual accords (5th, 9th and 10th gen), so I suspect that how I drive is the cause, and not a mechanical issue
 

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Oh I do 5 to 2 shifts on my current Accord at 80km/h or 50mph at times. Never double clutched and it's still fun. If my car can't get into gear comfortably, time for new fluid!

Like I said, to each of their own. It's like driving manual in general nowadays given the objective superiority of automatic transmissions. If you like it then do it. I don't find double clutching fun or useful personally.

And I don't think double clutching will solve OP's problem here. They aren't having trouble getting in gear, they just struggle to do the upshifting without bucking.

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Quite right, I strayed away from helping the OP. Apologies.

As others said, it sounds like the problem is "rev-hanging" between upshifts.

Some modern engines have this problem, like the 2020 Civic Si (which is only available with a manual trans) discussed in this test:

"Upshifting smoothly in the Civic Si is an exercise in frustration. The revs drop so slowly that if you were to wait for the engine speed to match the next gear, you'll spend at least a second with each shift. It's an unfortunate characteristic that mars the greatness of the transmission and results in uncomfortable shunts of forward movement as the clutch engagement forces the engine down to speed. Not only is it difficult to drive smoothly, it made me feel like an irresponsible car owner putting unnecessary strain on the driveline."

Shifting to neutral (double-clutching) between the 1-2 upshift might help. How so?

Shifting to neutral, the engine engages the transmission input shaft; I'd expect the added drag of that shaft would cause the engine rev's to drop more quickly, for a smoother upshift.

But I don't have a stick-shift car with a rev-hanging engine, so can't verify it myself.

This long-winded guy kinda explains it, then demonstrates... skip ahead to 2:45 and stop at 4:15...
 

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I did this with my 2014, it did not seem to change the feel compared to Honda MTF. I also get occasional grinds going into 2nd, this has been an issue on all 3 of my manual accords (5th, 9th and 10th gen), so I suspect that how I drive is the cause, and not a mechanical issue
I suggested Ansoil purely as a possible remedy, and personally believe Honda transmission fluids - manual and auto - work very well. I'm not changing to Amsoil.
As far as the manual transmission in our Accord my wife and I drive and shift like people who are old enough to know what it costs to tear up a car's main components. I think the trouble shifting comes from the Accord's linkage - that is, if the gear shift is not accurately directed from 2nd to 3rd and from 4th to 5th or downshifted from 5th or 6th into 4th, 3rd or 2nd there is some resistance that I can feel. But not a grind.
Overall I like the Accord with a manual transmission. It is fun to drive and almost everyone who rides in the car is intrigued with a new car having a manual transmission. And, I do get on it every so often, and I believe my wife does as well when she drives it. :)
 

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I suggested Ansoil purely as a possible remedy, and personally believe Honda transmission fluids - manual and auto - work very well. I'm not changing to Amsoil. . . . I drive and shift like people who are old enough to know what it costs to tear up a car's main components. . . .
Permit me to add my 2-cents WRT Amsoil's ("Synthetic Manual Synchromesh Transmission Fluid"). It works great. I first tried it 18 years ago. At the time any number of Civic Si owners were complaining that their cars' transmissions were either difficult to shift or would grind on the 1st-to-2nd gear shift. (We could debate all the reasons this was occurring until the cows come home. The reasons are important enough, but what's more important is the fix.) And in this regard, a "really good" manual transmission fluid helps. It's not a "fix" -- it's still possible to get ahead of the synchromesh cones in a MT, but a top-quality synthetic such as Amsoil's MTF certainly will help, particularly in cold weather. Pennzoil's synthetic is another, equally impressive product.

Please note: I'm not saying that Honda's OEM fluid is "bad". It's not. But it clearly is formulated to improve fuel mileage too, and IMHO that makes it a compromise. It works fine if you drive like a rational human being, but really top-quality synthetics, formulated specifically to improve the shifting performance, do just that -- improve the shifting performance. Pennzoil's synthetic MTF is relatively inexpensive compared to Amsoil's MTF, and unlike Amsoil's product which cannot be purchased over-the-counter, you can purchase Pennzoil's MTF at virtually any auto parts store. Consequently, if you're into experimentation, I'd start there.
 

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Several years ago I bought a used 2004 Acura RSX Type S with 6 speed manual for my son. Had 130,000 miles on it. It had an issue shifting from 2 - 3, however, somehow we didn’t notice on the test drives we took. After reading several forums, the consensus fix was changing the transmission fluid. Two fluids were discussed: Amsoil and GM Synchromesh. Most people went with the GM.

It boggled my mind to put a GM branded product into my Honda, but was certainly cheaper than replacing the synchros. I went ahead and bought the fluid and took it to a local Honda dealer to do the exchange. I couldn’t believe the night and day difference in shifting. Made the transmission smooth as butter for all shifts. My son has put 30,000 more miles on the car and still shifts great.

Based on this experience, I too would recommend changing the fluid and consider both GM and Amsoil.

Side note: wish Acura would figure out how to make fun, sporty cars again (I.E. 6 speed manual!). Their current offerings are so boring and nothing I’d ever consider buying. So glad Honda still offers the 6 speed manual in the Accord. Without it, the Accord is just another boring family sedan.
 

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Side note: wish Acura would figure out how to make fun, sporty cars again (I.E. 6 speed manual!). Their current offerings are so boring and nothing I’d ever consider buying. So glad Honda still offers the 6 speed manual in the Accord. Without it, the Accord is just another boring family sedan.
This statement is enough to trigger some of the members of this forum who believe that manual transmission vehicles are an example of archaic technology that need to go the way of the horse and buggy. What they don't realize is that there is always going to be a group of car lovers who want an interesting car, not just a boring device to get from point A to B. Your statement about Acura really resonated with me, because I look back fondly on my father's old 1993 Acura Integra. That was an amazingly fun little sports car, and it didn't cost you an arm and a leg. It would be amazing to see Acura offer vehicles like this again.
 

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Several years ago I bought a used 2004 Acura RSX Type S with 6 speed manual for my son. Had 130,000 miles on it. It had an issue shifting from 2 - 3, however, somehow we didn’t notice on the test drives we took. After reading several forums, the consensus fix was changing the transmission fluid. Two fluids were discussed: Amsoil and GM Synchromesh. Most people went with the GM.

It boggled my mind to put a GM branded product into my Honda, but was certainly cheaper than replacing the synchros. I went ahead and bought the fluid and took it to a local Honda dealer to do the exchange. I couldn’t believe the night and day difference in shifting. Made the transmission smooth as butter for all shifts. My son has put 30,000 more miles on the car and still shifts great.

Based on this experience, I too would recommend changing the fluid and consider both GM and Amsoil.

Side note: wish Acura would figure out how to make fun, sporty cars again (I.E. 6 speed manual!). Their current offerings are so boring and nothing I’d ever consider buying. So glad Honda still offers the 6 speed manual in the Accord. Without it, the Accord is just another boring family sedan.
Same on the NSX! I have been running GM Synchromesh blend with LSD additive on my NSX for two years. While it also causes controversy in the NSX world, I can personally attest to a night and day improvement in shift quality. I’m not ready to do the same in my Accord, though. All I need is to tune out that 1-2 rev hang and I’ll be happy.

PS As a multiple Acura owner, I would also love to see Acura give us a manual tranny fun car. I’d buy one.
 

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More than just a manual transmission, I want more engines that rev above 8K RPM and make their power deep into the upper 7K+ range. It was fun driving those types of cars.
 

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Acura caters more to the older people now, and even if they make something sporty, it will probably be of a Grand Tourer than a sports car.

I mean, there is always the Civic Si, and interior-wise, a new Honda isn't terrible.
More than just a manual transmission, I want more engines that rev above 8K RPM and make their power deep into the upper 7K+ range. It was fun driving those types of cars.
They are rare because as I mentioned in the other thread, they aren't efficient and the 4-cylinder ones don't tend to be easy to drive around the town. They also likely don't meet the emission standards nowadays.

If you really want one, you can grab a Shelby GT350. The 5.2 Voodoo engine revs to 8200 RPM and makes peak horsepower of 526 BHP. Being a V8 the low-end torque isn't that bad, either. The flat-plane crank also makes it sound more exotic. The downside? Have fun paying for gas and the gas guzzler tax if you buy one new. It gets 14 MPG city and 21 MPG highway.

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I don’t get much better than 14 mpg city in my L4! 😂
You sure someone didn't sneak into your house one night and swapped your K24 with a Renesis(the RX-8 engine)? Because that's what I get in the RX-8.

In all seriousness, I still struggle to see how you drive the car unless you are driving the car daily like how one would drive at an autocross, which is using 2nd gear only for 98% of the time.

Other than the Shelby GT350 I can't think of many other newer cars that revs above 8k RPM... There is also the 911 GT3 that revs to 8250 RPM but that's an even more expensive car. You are probably restricted to the used market with cars like S2000, RX-8 and E9x M3.

Or alternatively, get a motorcycle and laugh at the ridiculously low redlines of every car on the road.
 

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In all seriousness I get about 17-18. That is a cold engine, a 2 mile commute, and shifting in the peak torque range of 3500-4K RPM.
You have some guts doing 3.5k~4k shifts with a cold engine. I personally don't rev mine past 3k until the coolant temp is up.

And I personally stick to 2.5 to 3k shifts normally.

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Nah, 3.5K is fine with cold here. It’s not like it’s below zero or anything. I’d never drive the car if I was worried about that. Commute is too short. Everything I drive to is within a 5 mile radius as well. No real way around it, but I’m not shifting at 2.5K RPM. I never did that when learning to drive 20+ years ago, and it just doesn’t come natural.

Further, the Mini Cooper has an automatic and it will naturally shift near 4K in non-sport mode, so I don’t think it’s an issue.
 
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