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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I've got a new 2013 V6 coupe with the manual transmission. It's my first manual transmission in a car (I ride a motorcycle usually).

When I'm shifting gears, there seems to be some resistance going into gears. It's mostly 1->2 or 3->2 or 2->1. Is this normal? It's not really grinding (like not having the clutch all the way in...) but it's not really as easy to shift between gears. I can force it into gear with some more effort.

I tried searching for the behavior, and it was suggested that that's how the synchro's make it act. Does that seem reasonable? Does anyone else's transmission behave like that?
 

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How many miles on your car? Most manual gear boxes are a bit stiff for the first 1000 miles or so, cold weather can contribute also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The car has about 1500 miles on it so far. Most of them have been highway miles just cruising in 6th though.
 

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The shifter in my '12 Si was very notchy when new, much like you describe. Cold temps, plus being new make this more noticeable. Also make sure you are pausing briefly between gear changes and not just trying to force the shifter from one gear to the next in one rapid motion.
 

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Motorcycle transmissions use a wet-clutch setup and works completely different so I can see why you may be concerned. The term for what you are referring to is called a "notchy" transmission. Yes, this 100% normal in all honda manual transmissions and most people prefer it because it gives the driver direct feedback of engagement. It will be slightly less apparent as your synchros mesh some more with miles but it will always have a notchy feel. You will learn to enjoy and appreciate it even more when you have the chance to drive other manual cars. Honda makes one of the best feeling manual transmissions on the market.
 

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if your rpms arent in the right range youll feel some resistance going into a gear. like say your going 20 and try to put it into first youll have to really force it. when the rpms are matched perfect the shifter will just slip right in. for an experiment as your coming up to speed in second just put some pressure on the shifter knob and it will slip right out of second and be ready for you to shift into third. wont need to push the clutch in at all to get it from second to neutral. itll slip right out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The shifter in my '12 Si was very notchy when new, much like you describe. Cold temps, plus being new make this more noticeable. Also make sure you are pausing briefly between gear changes and not just trying to force the shifter from one gear to the next in one rapid motion.
I'm usually adding some delay when shifting while I'm waiting for the revs to fall. Is it bad to go from one gear straight into the next in one sweep?

Motorcycle transmissions use a wet-clutch setup and works completely different so I can see why you may be concerned.
Yeah, I think that is partially the problem. I'm used to how the bike shifts, and when I first got the car, I expected things to be more or less the same. I didn't realize the car needed such different treatment. I'm still trying to get used to the car (things like the revs hanging some, etc.). I can shift the bike in half a second and be back on the gas no problem, but I gotta wait a few in the car. Can't quite figure out how to shift faster while being smooth :dunno:
 

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You'll figure it out with time

Hey guys. I've got a new 2013 V6 coupe with the manual transmission. It's my first manual transmission in a car (I ride a motorcycle usually).

When I'm shifting gears, there seems to be some resistance going into gears. It's mostly 1->2 or 3->2 or 2->1. Is this normal? It's not really grinding (like not having the clutch all the way in...) but it's not really as easy to shift between gears. I can force it into gear with some more effort.

I tried searching for the behavior, and it was suggested that that's how the synchro's make it act. Does that seem reasonable? Does anyone else's transmission behave like that?
You'll just have to get used to how it feels. In the mean-time, I would just suggest a few things. If you are using more than a little pressure to go into gear on downshifts, you are probably trying to do a downshift where the revs are too high to shift down into the lower gear. I would not suggest trying to do a 6-3 down shift. A 5-3 is not AS bad, especially if the vehicle speed is not that high, but still, if you are a beginner, I would not suggest trying that too often. You will figure out what the correct vehicle speed for downshifts is through experience. I rarely go into second gear from any gear other than third, because I don't like all the pressure/force feedback I feel through the clutch pedal and shifter. When I first got the Accord, I tried 4-2 downshifts in slow turns, because the 4-3 downshifts don't give you that much torque coming out of the corner, but I have pretty much quit doing that, because of the pressure feed-back. [I have the 4-cylinder engine, which has a lot less torque than the V6. I doubt you would have a problem with too-low torque
in third out of a slow corner].

My first two cars were a manual 5-speed Mazda 323 SE [1989-2001], and a 6 MT Mazda Miata. Honda's gear box, at least in my I4, is far superior to those two Mazda transmissions, much less notchy feeling, and you feel the synchros less. I would suggest that you never try to down shift into first, even from second, unless the car is almost at a complete stop. There's really no need to, and you aren't gonna lug the engine in second until the car has almost stopped. With manual gear-boxes, I would say if it feels, intuitively to you, that there is too much force being applied through the clutch-feel and shifter, then there probably is.

Hope all this helps.
 

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Not really a notchy transmission

The gear-box in the I4 at least, is really not very notchy, even when new, compared to other manual transmissions I've driven, even when new. Not sure about the one in the V6, though.
 

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Yea my wife has a 2013 accord v6 manual and she hates the feel here in the cold. Its been about 25-30 degrees everyday. I thought she was just complaining until I drove it and had the same issue. Im sure if I just used a different fluid I would have better luck Honda stock MTF seems to always be junk
 

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Hey guys. I've got a new 2013 V6 coupe with the manual transmission. It's my first manual transmission in a car (I ride a motorcycle usually).

When I'm shifting gears, there seems to be some resistance going into gears. It's mostly 1->2 or 3->2 or 2->1. Is this normal? It's not really grinding (like not having the clutch all the way in...) but it's not really as easy to shift between gears. I can force it into gear with some more effort.

I tried searching for the behavior, and it was suggested that that's how the synchro's make it act. Does that seem reasonable? Does anyone else's transmission behave like that?
My 2012 6-6 (12,000 miles, same transmission) is also notchy, which I find shocking because it is a Honda with a reputation for great shifting manual transmissions. It is not a terrible condition, but I believe it is an inherent characteristic of the car.

I’ve found I can minimize the resistance by altering my shift rhythm. At low rpm I shift a little slower. I sort of take the tension out the system and feel for the sweet spot. As I use higher shift points and more throttle, I shift faster. At higher rpm there is almost no notchiness, if that is actually a word.

Of course the problem is I usually use a 2,500 rpm shift point around town which is where I feel the most shift resistance. I’ve often wondered what part of the shift-system is the culprit. Is it the shift linkage right below the stick shift in our center console, the “tree” on top of the transmission, something inside the transmission (synchros) or something else? It almost feels like a good shot of lubricant could fix it. To me it is very livable, but it is definitely not “old Honda” smooth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hey guys, sorry to bump my thread, but I I thought it'd be better than a new post.

Is it normal for there to be any grinding at all when shifting gears (while clutch is fully floored)? It seems like between 1st and 2nd it will do it some. Sometimes it seems to catch a little when going into 3rd. As far as I know, it shouldn't grind any.

I'm not slamming it into gear or anything, and the RPM's aren't that high (2000-3000 RPM). There's only 2300 miles on the car... I have no idea why this is happening :( It's slightly cold out (30-40 F), but it's a new car :dunno:
 

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Modern transmissions have a crazy low first gear. The step to second is larger than the other steps in terms of revs. Especially when cold, if you shift out of 1st and wait a second before pushing into second you probably won't have the issue. I am on my third stick shift car and it will probably be my last. Daily driving with cars geared this way is annoying. You feel like slug as everyone in an automatic gets rolling with ease.
If you are rolling slightly or on a down hill starting there's not really in harm in starting in second. It seems the second gear these days is where first gear was in the old 4 speeds.

Something else you should be careful about, Honda reverse is not synchronized. You must be still to shift into reverse or you will get grind.
 

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There should be no grinding at all but the transmission will be a bit slow to react if you try to shift too quickly when the car is still warming up. I've noticed some resistance shifting into second while shifting a bit prematurely while cold as if I was forcing the syhchros to do their job (no grinding though). When the car is still cold be very deliberate while disengaging the clutch, change gears, then proceed to shift.

This transmission, while good, does have it's own unique quirks. The clutch pedal is almost completely numb. There is the occasional notchy feel but I find that to be positive as it reassures you physically that you've successfully changed the gear. I find stabbing the clutch quickly and slowly engaging the next gear followed up with a smooth consistent clutch release results in very smooth gear shifts. The numb clutch makes fast gear changes a bit trickier than usual IMO.

Don't worry too much about grinding your gears, we all do it, even the liars that say they never have. Honda manuals have proven to be quite durable and are designed in such a way that occasional grinding has a minimal effect on longevity. Enjoy your car, it'll probably take about one year to really get a feel for the transmission.
 

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Mine gets a bit grumpy when the outside temp is low (25F and down). I just give it an extra clutch pump and shes golden. I've also found the car to like a little throttle blip when down shifting. Smooooth as silk.
 

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2013 Accord V6-6MT
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Hey guys. I've got a new 2013 V6 coupe with the manual transmission. It's my first manual transmission in a car (I ride a motorcycle usually).

When I'm shifting gears, there seems to be some resistance going into gears. It's mostly 1->2 or 3->2 or 2->1. Is this normal? It's not really grinding (like not having the clutch all the way in...) but it's not really as easy to shift between gears. I can force it into gear with some more effort.

I tried searching for the behavior, and it was suggested that that's how the synchro's make it act. Does that seem reasonable? Does anyone else's transmission behave like that?
As someone who rode motorcycles for years and currently drives a coupe V6 6MT, I believe I am somewhat qualified to comment.

First of all, forget about your motorcycle experience......it is an apples an oranges thing in some respects. Once moving, you can shift a motorcycle without using the clutch by backing off the throttle, plus up and down shifting is sequential only. The foot shift is deliberate and short throw, and you become accustomed to the required force, without regard for whether "it's not really easy."

There are three things a newbie needs to master when learning to drive a car with a 6MT: 1) Not stalling from a standing start, 2) smooth (not jerky) up and down shifting, and NOT grinding the gears.

Unlike a motorcycle, in a car, you must fully release the clutch before shifting, otherwise, you may grind the gears, or experience "stiff" shifting, which is not only detrimental to the transmission, but clearly marks you as a newbie.

The Honda clutch engages fairly low in the clutch travel range, so you must make sure that the clutch is fully depressed to the floor before attempting to shift. This not only avoids gear grinding, but contributes to smooth shifting, a quality which is rarely mentioned in motorcycle reviews.

Don't let anyone mislead you by saying that gear grinding (ever) and extra-effort gear shifts are ok.....that is not true, and the likely cause is that you have not fully disengaged the clutch when shifting. Remember: Unlike a motorcycle, you must fully depress the pedal to the floor for smooth and grind-free shifting.
 

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It seems as if you were subtly referring to previous posts, mine included. Allow me to respond. No one here, myself included, implied grinding was ok merely that it is something that will happen and it's not worth beating yourself up over it...particularly with 2300 miles on the car. Learning to drive a MT is stressful enough and you shouldn't focus on minor gaffes due to inexperienced shifting.

Yes, it's completely true that it shouldn't be happening and it's very likely due to the low engagement point and rushed shifting. The points you made regarding the basics of MT are true.

Even so, mistakes will be made and life is too short to worry about the small stuff. sage_, your car will survive and you will soon be enjoying the control your MT gives you.
 

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Hey guys, sorry to bump my thread, but I I thought it'd be better than a new post.

Is it normal for there to be any grinding at all when shifting gears (while clutch is fully floored)? It seems like between 1st and 2nd it will do it some. Sometimes it seems to catch a little when going into 3rd. As far as I know, it shouldn't grind any.

I'm not slamming it into gear or anything, and the RPM's aren't that high (2000-3000 RPM). There's only 2300 miles on the car... I have no idea why this is happening :( It's slightly cold out (30-40 F), but it's a new car :dunno:
I have owned/driven dozens of manuals and grinding is not normal under any circumstance.

I benchmark all manuals against the Miata and Rx-8 and have yet to find any as good as those.

I did not test drive the MT-6 Accord but the MT-4 Accord was very good.

Again, grinding is not normal.
 

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{Snip}

Even so, mistakes will be made and life is too short to worry about the small stuff. sage_, your car will survive and you will soon be enjoying the control your MT gives you.
The idea is to learn from your mistakes and improve, rather than dismissing a possible lack of skills and understanding as "small stuff." It is not a matter of the car surviving, rather it is a matter of whether an individual wants to be a skillful MT driver through practice and use of proper techniques, or not.

If one is an enthusiast and values the driver involvement afforded by a MT, there is much pride and satisfaction in learning to use a MT skillfully. That, indeed, is a source of enjoyment for me.
 

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I get the feeling that we both feel the same way but have a different way of approaching mistakes. It's been shown that anxiety related to past mistakes made leads to more problems created. It's best to focus on learning skills than worrying about past mistakes; grinding in this particular situation.

In this case I'm quite confident that he's worried about damaging his car based on his posts, while understandable, is highly unlikely given the engineering that goes into making these vehicles. I wanted to ensure he wasn't too focused on that and spends his time on learning the basics.

I'm confident we both have the same opinion but we are looking at it from different angles.
 
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