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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Winter is here. I normally warm up the car for 2-3 minutes in near 34-40 temperature. Is this ok for a DI engine?
 

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It actually warms up faster if you start up the car and drive. With my car, hot heated air comes out of the air vents a minute into my drive. So IMO, no need to warm up the car before driving.
 

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Dont think so...

I personally let my car idle in the morning until the temp gauge rises to the line above "C" before taking off.

I tried to drive with the engine completely cold a few times and I did not like the way the car behaved. The CVT would not upshift ratios and was REALLY "whiney" at 25-30 (louder than radio).

On a side note, I realize the DI engine takes a long time to reach operational temps. The 8th gen we have warms up nearly twice as fast. One could speculate that the CVT keeps the revs low, so less heat generated...
 

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There is no need to warm up an engine any more.

This was done in the days of carbs to allow the engine get past high idle and off the choke for better driveability. Just get in and go. You may want to avoid WOT for a few minutes.

Me, I drive it like a rental. Todays cars, engines and lubricants are far better than even 15 years ago.

Growing up I had a friend whos dad I swear the car was still starting and he had the clutch out and was moving down the driveway. He swore by Nissans and got 200,000mi out of each one.

Stop warming up engines.


Jay
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There is no need to warm up an engine any more.

This was done in the days of carbs to allow the engine get past high idle and off the choke for better driveability. Just get in and go. You may want to avoid WOT for a few minutes.

Me, I drive it like a rental. Todays cars, engines and lubricants are far better than even 15 years ago.

Growing up I had a friend whos dad I swear the car was still starting and he had the clutch out and was moving down the driveway. He swore by Nissans and got 200,000mi out of each one.

Stop warming up engines.


Jay
Good Points. Now I would like to hear the other side as well.
I believe in letting it idle for at least a couple of minutes.
 

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I used to wait until the RPMs dropped to 1000 in my TSX. In this car, that seems to take 2-3mins. That's unrealistic IMO to warm a modern vehicle that long. Just don't slam the gas down until the temp gauge gets above C and it'll be fine.
 

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2-3 minutes in 34-40 degrees is way too much. I use it in temperatures well bellow freezing in New England. In 34-40 I would probably give it 30 seconds or so and then be easy on the pedal until I see movement of the temp. gauge.
 

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Growing up I had a friend whos dad I swear the car was still starting and he had the clutch out and was moving down the driveway.
Stop warming up engines.
Ha ha ha, there is always one dad like this in every group of friends...he is putting on his seat belt, starting the car, and letting the clutch out all at once. By the end of the driveway, he has the news radio turned on, is sipping coffee, and complaining about the pinheads in Washington, DC...
 

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I'm with karfreek.. that's the old days before fuel injection was the norm like my '79 Vette I sold a few years ago. Letting today's newer vehicles warm more than 30 seconds is wasting fuel. But I will state, its best not to Rev up to high RPMs the first few miles of your trip until the engine temp has warmed to normal range
 

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I believe in letting it idle for at least a couple of minutes.
Why?

The CVT may take a little time to "feel smoother", but your engine? Like what was stated- your car does not need to be "warmed up" until you want wide open throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Why?

The CVT may take a little time to "feel smoother", but your engine? Like what was stated- your car does not need to be "warmed up" until you want wide open throttle.
I do get the argument about the new engines being more adaptable. Its more out of a concern for the CVT. Although, I personally have never experienced any jerking.
 

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I give it about 20 to 30 seconds. I do like the auto setting on the heater. It wont turn the blower on until the engine warms up.
 

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You guys down in the USA and warmer climates probably never really need to worry about this.

US Canucks however do. When my car is sitting in -40C overnight and covered in ice and 2 foot snow in the morning - yeah it needs to warm up and I'm talking 10-15mins at least.

Remote start is our friend up here.
 

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Winter is here. I normally warm up the car for 2-3 minutes in near 34-40 temperature. Is this ok for a DI engine?
Most of the car experts I read and listen to say to just start the car, wait no more than a minute at most, and then drive gently until your car reaches its normal operating temperature as indicated by the temp gauge. The main point is to avoid heavy acceleration when the car is cold. Just go easy on the gas for the first few miles (or however long it takes to get into the normal temp range) and then go for it. Of course, if your car is a block of ice in the morning then you have no choice. You have to let it idle while you're clearing everything off.

I kind of look at cars as they're they living things. For example, when most people get up, they don't just dash out the door at full speed and start their day. Instead, they get up kinda groggy, take a shower, get something to eat...and then they're ready to face the world. Of course, that whole process takes way more than a few minutes but with your car it's sort of the same thing. Start it up, drive gently until it's fully warmed up, then go for it and enjoy the driving experience! :thmsup:
 

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I'll let it idle for 30 seconds if it's around freezing or below, and avoid heavy acceleration until the temp gauge moves. It usually takes me longer to brush the snow off. Modern engines are more robust, but they're still made of metal, plastic and rubber. Flooring a cold engine imparts more friction wear to moving components. At home I'll warm it up for 5-10 minutes. I prefer to step into a car spewing warm air and radiating heat from the leather seats. We've had snow the last two days, and I have to say the rear defroster is very slow compared to previous cars I've owned.
 

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I do get the argument about the new engines being more adaptable. Its more out of a concern for the CVT. Although, I personally have never experienced any jerking.
Mine feels like a slipping clutch almost every time I start off, and it's worse now that it's getting colder. I am gonna bring it up when I get my oil changed.
 

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The rear defroster isn't very quick at all.
 

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A waste of time and gas in my opinion, for which I am the world's expert on. This is a matter of preference just like changing the oil at 3K which is another waste of time and money. The one correct answer is doing what you prefer. You will neither harm nor help your car warming up.
 
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