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Even My Mower Is a Honda!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My I4-M6 turns 2,400rpm at 65. I feel this is kinda high as the EarthDreams 2.4L has some decent torque for a 4-Cyl. The M6 will let you shift with the cruise on and automatically resume after the shift. So, I wish that they maybe made it turn lower, toward 2,000rpm, even if I had to shift on some grades to 5th.

What does the CVT turn while cruising at 65? It has been shown to get better HWY mpg so I am curious.

Jay
 

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Its very close to 2000 on my CVT but remember that the CVT has 7 Simulated gears so if your manual had 7 gears it would act in the same way. IF you are getting good MPGs how it is what is your worry? Its not causing any additional wear on your engine.
 

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I think it does 2000 RPM at 70 MPH. I can check it out in the morning on my way to work.
 

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It is about 1900RPM at 65mph with Torque App.

7th simulated gear in Sport mode gives about 2350RPM at 65mph.
 

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Its very close to 2000 on my CVT but remember that the CVT has 7 Simulated gears so if your manual had 7 gears it would act in the same way. IF you are getting good MPGs how it is what is your worry? Its not causing any additional wear on your engine.
Those simulated 7 speeds are only when using the paddle shifters.
 

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According to the Car and Driver specs below:

http://www.caranddriver.com/compari...ng-performance-data-and-complete-specs-page-4

“top gearing” for the CVT is 37.1 mph for every 1,000 rpm. If you do the math, that means it cranks:

1,617 rpm at 60 mph
1,752 rpm at 65 mph
1,886 rpm at 70 mph
2,021 rpm at 75 mph

To the best of my knowledge, the I4-6MT is geared at 26.9 mph for every 1,000 rpm in 6th gear. That translates to:

2,232 rpm at 60 mph
2,418 rpm at 65 mph
2,604 rpm at 70 mph
2,790 rpm at 75 mph


The CVT is geared very low. If this difference bothers you, don’t let it. 2,200 rpm for the 6MT at 60 mph is still sufficiently low for highway comfort and fuel economy. Based on what I’ve read, despite the 6MT and CVT rpm difference, the CVT and 6MT seem to deliver the same highway fuel mileage. (If it makes you feel any better, my V6-6MT cranks about 2,100 rpm at 60 and still delivers 33+ mpg at 70-75 mph.) As Paticumbia mentioned, the rpm differential has no effect on longevity. And there is a benefit - much better highway throttle response.


EDIT: According to this Motor Trend article:

http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests...mry_se_2014_mazda6_grand_touring/viewall.html

the CVT cranks 1,700 rpm at 60 mph. They could have rounded up. This is higher than what the math would suggest but still very low.
 

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Even My Mower Is a Honda!
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Its very close to 2000 on my CVT but remember that the CVT has 7 Simulated gears so if your manual had 7 gears it would act in the same way. IF you are getting good MPGs how it is what is your worry? Its not causing any additional wear on your engine.
Im getting what the sticker calls for on the hwy, sometimes 2mpg more (36). Im not really worried about the extra 4-500rpm doing any damage to the engine. But, I cant help thinking that Honda could have eeked a few more MPG out of the manual by gearing 6th a little more highway friendly. IMO 5th and 6th are too close together ratio wise. Also, when the RPMs start getting toward 3,000 on the hwy you can really start to hear the engine hum in the cabin.

According to the Car and Driver specs below:

http://www.caranddriver.com/compari...ng-performance-data-and-complete-specs-page-4

“top gearing” for the CVT is 37.1 mph for every 1,000 rpm. If you do the math, that means it cranks:

1,617 rpm at 60 mph
1,752 rpm at 65 mph
1,886 rpm at 70 mph
2,021 rpm at 75 mph

To the best of my knowledge, the I4-6MT is geared at 26.9 mph for every 1,000 rpm in 6th gear. That translates to:

2,232 rpm at 60 mph
2,418 rpm at 65 mph
2,604 rpm at 70 mph
2,790 rpm at 75 mph


The CVT is geared very low. If this difference bothers you, don’t let it. 2,200 rpm for the 6MT at 60 mph is still sufficiently low for highway comfort and fuel economy. Based on what I’ve read, despite the 6MT and CVT rpm difference, the CVT and 6MT seem to deliver the same highway fuel mileage. (If it makes you feel any better, my V6-6MT cranks about 2,100 rpm at 60 and still delivers 33+ mpg at 70-75 mph.) As Paticumbia mentioned, the rpm differential has no effect on longevity. And there is a benefit - much better highway throttle response.


EDIT: According to this Motor Trend article:

http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests...mry_se_2014_mazda6_grand_touring/viewall.html

the CVT cranks 1,700 rpm at 60 mph. They could have rounded up. This is higher than what the math would suggest but still very low.
Thank you! I was just curious. I know on my Challenger the manuals ran a much lower highway rpm when compared to the Auto. The manual was 1,400 @ 60 and the Auto was 2,000 at 60. The Auto did have MDS (read: VCM) but did not use it very often. 26hwy at 75 was very common in my Challenger.

Jay
 

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Unfortunately when Honda went to a 6 speed they kept 6th the same as 5th on the previous car and crammed one more gear in the same range. I would have much preferred that they kept the 5 gears the same and added a sixth taller gear.
 

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This morning driving to work my engine RPM on flat terrain at a steady speed was 1,900 RPM at 65 MPH and 2,000 RPM at 70 MPH. This was with the ECO mode on which I don't think makes any difference.
 

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This morning driving to work my engine RPM on flat terrain at a steady speed was 1,900 RPM at 65 MPH and 2,000 RPM at 70 MPH. This was with the ECO mode on which I don't think makes any difference.
Aye - I looked this morning and was just under 2,000 while cruising at 65.

I've often wondered why they don't invent a "Cruise" button which would let you drop down to about 1,000 RPM at normal highway speeds - once you're moving at 60 MPH you don't need much to keep you going at that speed - no?

Clearly there's a flaw to my premise though as nobody does this.
 

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Aye - I looked this morning and was just under 2,000 while cruising at 65.

I've often wondered why they don't invent a "Cruise" button which would let you drop down to about 1,000 RPM at normal highway speeds - once you're moving at 60 MPH you don't need much to keep you going at that speed - no?

Clearly there's a flaw to my premise though as nobody does this.
I've thought about this too. My best guess it the gear ratio is too extreme for the CVT, and going that fast at such low RPM's doesn't give the engine much of a chance to not stall if you slow down very fast.
 
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