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In doing my research prior to buying my Touring, virtually every media review commented negatively on the push button transmission controls, saying it was annoying or hard to use. I found it immediately intuitive and after 2 months I love it. It clears up significant space in the center console area vs a traditional shift leaver. I use a phone mount that fits into the never used cigarette lighter in front of the center console and it puts my phone right where a traditional lever would be. It also allows unencumbered access to the cup holders and the dash buttons. I see no down side to it at all. I'm surprised it is not more universally praised.
 

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I’m with you. I’ve had mine about 18 months, took me about 2 days to get used to it. I love it too.
 

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In doing my research prior to buying my Touring, virtually every media review commented negatively on the push button transmission controls, saying it was annoying or hard to use.
It's just because this generation of buyers hasn't seen it much, if at all...

It's really nothing ground breaking, either.
I had one on an old Dodge Dart I had a zillion years ago.
 

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Most reviewers on social and print media are Nancys interested in click-bait "journalism" designed to spark controversy and make themselves seem important. They should be captured and ground into a protein-type paste and fed to sharks during Shark Week.

When I was at the USDOT, I used to meet lots of these clowns at every car unveiling or auto show. I was at Ford HQ in Dearborn and we were going to take a Shelby Mustang around the track. These Nancys couldn't drive worth squat- so they just get the numbers (how much horsepower, etc) and print canned phrases such as, "No one will doubt that this is the best Mustang offering yet!" and "Old Carroll sure would be smiling!"

Bunch of Nancys....I asked them why they don't write about how easy/difficult it was to change the oil- and none of them knew how, laughing, "Oh we take it to the dealer, lol." Really? Some guy drops $80,000 and he's going to take it to the Ford dealer's "Quick Lube Job" center and get squeezed in between Chad doing a Festiva and a "miracle it still runs" Focus? No.....
 

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I got a Sport 2.0t yesterday and although the push button shifter is a bit different, it seems like it's something that I'll get used to as I drive it more. I really don't mind it at all.
 

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It takes a few days to get used to it, and then it just becomes second nature. Most of the people on this site that have complained about it or called it a gimmick will probably own one in 5 years.
 

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I opined in the other forum a little while back that I don't like it and I still don't. It's not a deal breaker but I'd MUCH rather prefer a stick/lever! Since I bought it back in Oct/Nov, I've had more than a handful of times where I'd hit a button (apparently not hard enough, long enough, or too soon after start up) and the car didn't shift into that gear (both R and D on different occasions) - then, when I pressed on the accelerator, either nothing happened or the wrong thing happened and I had to look down to see that it didn't engage. That wouldn't have happened with a stick/lever. The majority of cars and both my motorcycles have been manual transmissions and that's what I prefer. I only got the 10AT because my wife and kids don't drive MT (at least yet for my kids). (Also before I get accused of simply being a dim wit, I train and teach gross/fine motor skill "stuff" for a living and like to believe that have higher levels of proprioception and coordination than the average goober walking around... ;) )
 

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I'm in the "like the buttons" camp. I've not had any trouble getting used to using them, I appreciate the unrestricted access to cups in the cup holders, and I've never had any shifts that were wrong or that didn't occur like I wanted. In my opinion, the buttons are not so sensitive that they are easily accidentally triggered either.

- Jack
 

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I opined in the other forum a little while back that I don't like it and I still don't. It's not a deal breaker but I'd MUCH rather prefer a stick/lever! Since I bought it back in Oct/Nov, I've had more than a handful of times where I'd hit a button (apparently not hard enough, long enough, or too soon after start up) and the car didn't shift into that gear (both R and D on different occasions) - then, when I pressed on the accelerator, either nothing happened or the wrong thing happened and I had to look down to see that it didn't engage. That wouldn't have happened with a stick/lever. The majority of cars and both my motorcycles have been manual transmissions and that's what I prefer. I only got the 10AT because my wife and kids don't drive MT (at least yet for my kids). (Also before I get accused of simply being a dim wit, I train and teach gross/fine motor skill "stuff" for a living and like to believe that have higher levels of proprioception and coordination than the average goober walking around... ;) )
Agreed, I don't care for it either. Unnecessary IMO. For a frequent touch point, I don't think it looks, feels or operates in a way that is pleasing to the touch either.
It takes an extra half second to think about/look at. I understand there is no gear linkage, I'd still much prefer a shifter. I like to rest my hand there as well.

Cosmetically, I also much prefer the look of a traditional console shifter. Then again, I'm one of those crazies that would have bought a 6-speed Touring if they were produced. I chose the options over the manual trans (a manual trans that decidedly isn't one of Honda's better efforts I might add after driving a Sport and coming from 7th and 8th gen 6-speed's.)

I did get used to it, and it works, and it offers slightly easier access to the cup holders and an ability to shift itself into park when stopped if one is too lazy to do it, which I kinda like.
 

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I have the 1.5 CVT. The shifter is fine, I would think the buttons wouldn't bother me. Really, I've only been frustrated in some cars and trucks when there's no backlight. I have to mentally count "clicks" in my old Tacoma at night...
 

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It took me about a week to stop reaching for the stick shift, like some kind of ghost limb. I do miss having a place to rest my hand when I drive, but I like the push button gear selector. Having driven stick a lot in my life, I thought it was silly to have a stick shift for an automatic. My Ford had one on the steering column, which made more sense in the 70's.

Don't get me started about the electronic e-brake. How am I supposed to do a J-turn?
 

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I too was unsure of the buttons. With my '16 Sport, I was always shifting into Sport mode on the highway. Getting used to the push buttons, and have no issues. I do think the e-brake could be an issue. I once was in Atlanta and blew a brake line in my 2004 Tahoe Z71. I used the e-brake to get off the highway safely and held the brake release so I wouldn't lock up the rear brakes. Having the e-brake lever in the center makes using the e-brake in an emergency much easier. After all, it's an emergency brake. Can't really do that with buttons.

I expect the push button setup saves a few pounds and it's all about increased gas mileage these days.
 

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I am a fan as well and have never had an issue where I didn’t push a button hard enough to engage it. Most mired-day shifters are just an electronic joystick and are not connected to your transmission. Going to buttons is the most common sense evolution.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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I’d say neutral.

I used to do manual shifts so I always have my right hand prepared in the first few days after trade in. When I plan to reverse, I subconsciously push to the far right: that’s the R gear on Civic; when I’m accelerating, I release throttle and prepare to shift...

But it takes less than a week to get used to. I also find nothing fabulous about this button design. It does the shifting job and that’s it. Sometimes you’ll have to look at it before hitting a button.

I used to drive a GLC for a month, and then I got used to the shifting sticker. Later I switched back to MT Civic and played with the wiper sticker for a while lol. I’d say that’s more convenient and easy to use than the button.
 

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I too was unsure of the buttons. With my '16 Sport, I was always shifting into Sport mode on the highway. Getting used to the push buttons, and have no issues. I do think the e-brake could be an issue. I once was in Atlanta and blew a brake line in my 2004 Tahoe Z71. I used the e-brake to get off the highway safely and held the brake release so I wouldn't lock up the rear brakes. Having the e-brake lever in the center makes using the e-brake in an emergency much easier. After all, it's an emergency brake. Can't really do that with buttons.

I expect the push button setup saves a few pounds and it's all about increased gas mileage these days.
What model do you have?. My Sport came with a parking brake, an emergency brake was not even an option.
 

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I wouldn't mind a button, since the lever style selectors are also electronic switches anyway; but it must be positioned and shaped in a way that driver can easily find it by hand, feel its current position without looking at it, so the eye can be on the instrument cluster to verify the gear selection is successfully communicated to the computer.

Parking brake is a different story, but I strongly prefer a mechanical lever. It is easy to operate by hand, electrical assist is unnecessary, it just adds a reliance on battery power.
 
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