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What is every 10th Gen Hybrid owner getting for fuel economy? And please, to make this most useful and informative, tell us your location so we know what sort of driving conditions you have.

I have had my Touring for about a month, only one fill up so far but it was 41.1 mpg. Living in Maryland, we have some hills. Most of my driving is around town. Using the power meter for individual trips, I'm getting upper 40's and 50's for city type driving. Highway speeds bring lower mileage, but still in 40's. Not bad with the A/C.

I'm still learning how to drive this car. A real balance to get more 'battery' to be able to use in EV mode. Using the paddles has made a difference. At some point, I'm going to have to break down and use sport mode to see how much the mpg drops.
 

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With my first tank full, I measured around 42 mph. However, in short 10-14 mile test drives (mostly freeway) I was seeing 44-47. I also need to learn how to drive this for best mileage. However, gas mileage is not as important to me as it use to be (now retired). Quite a different driving experience from my old 2006 Prius.
 

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2 1/2 tanks in

Hey, new to the forum, first post!
Bought the 2018 Hybrid about a month ago, EX-L trim in Lunar Silver. Did a lot of city driving the first few weeks, taking kids back and forth to school. A lot of lights, and A LOT of hills, have about 1400 miles on it already.

First tank through the Accord measured 44 mpg, I measured it as 47. (Guessing dealership may have overfilled a little).
Second tank was a trip to Portland and back, family of five, fully loaded trunk at 75 mph down I-5, and some stop and go in Portland during rush hour. Accord said 43 mpg, my measurement was 44. I may have killed the mileage a bit on this as I ran it for a bit in Sport mode when showing it off...

Waiting to see what tank fill three is, but I'm about 200 miles away from finding out. With all the hills I have in town, I am loving those paddles... It runs in EV a lot.
 

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I have had my Touring for about a month, only one fillup so far but it was 41.1. Living in Murland, we have some hills. Most of my driving is around town. Using the power meter for individual trips, I'm getting upper 40's and 50's for city type driving. Highway speeds bring lower mileage, but still in 40's. Not bad with the A/C.

I'm still learning how to drive this car. A real balance to get more 'battery' to be able to use in EV mode. Using the paddles has made a difference. At some point, I'm going to have to break down and use sport mode to see how much the mpg drops.
Do you use the paddles to shift down, trumping what the auto transmission does?

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Do you use the paddles to shift down, trumping what the auto transmission does?
In my understanding, the CVT doesn't "shift" as such--it's a continuously variable gear ratio.

And the paddles control the level of regenerative braking. I don't think they have anything to do with the transmission as they do in "normal" cars.

Does anyone understand it differently?

From Page 472 of the Owner’s Manual:

“Deceleration Paddle Selector

"When you release the accelerator pedal, you can control the rate of deceleration without removing your hands from the steering wheel. Using the deceleration paddle selector situated on the steering wheel, you can sequentially shift through four stages of deceleration.

"When descending a hill, you can use the deceleration paddle selector to help maintain the rate of deceleration, thereby allowing you to keep a safe distance between your vehicle and the vehicle ahead as well as utilize engine braking.

"Each paddle selector operation makes a single stage deceleration change. The deceleration stage may not change if you pull the paddle selector continuously.

"To select the different stages of deceleration:

"• Pull back the + selector (right side) to decrease the deceleration stage.
"• Pull back the - selector (left side) to increase the deceleration stage.

"Pull the + selector for a few seconds when you want to cancel the deceleration paddle selector.”
 

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That is correct. Paddles only control the degree of regenerative braking and there's no shifting at all other than park to reverse to drive etc..
 

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That is correct. Paddles only control the degree of regenerative braking and there's no shifting at all other than park to reverse to drive etc..
The regenerative braking feels like you have shifted to a lower gear which I believe is forced and causes regeneration of power for the battery.

These vehicles should come with training! We're getting on the job training which is a fun way to learn but not always effective.
 

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Exposing my age, when my dad taught me to drive, using a lower gear to slow down rather than constantly leaning on the brakes was a thing. Gas was cheap and brakes were not easy or cheap to replace.

I do very much believe that this spinning of the tyranny while not using it to gain or maintain speed causes the energy to be directed back to the generator (reverse of normal flow) to be used and not wasted.

Use of paddles is part of get the best mpg I have found, and actually fun. More engaged driving.

I do very much believe that this spinning of the tyranny... Tranny... auto spellcheck needs a paddle!!
 

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Exposing my age, when my dad taught me to drive, using a lower gear to slow down rather than constantly leaning on the brakes was a thing. Gas was cheap and brakes were not easy or cheap to replace.

I do very much believe that this spinning of the tyranny while not using it to gain or maintain speed causes the energy to be directed back to the generator (reverse of normal flow) to be used and not wasted.

Use of paddles is part of get the best mpg I have found, and actually fun. More engaged driving.
If you have adaptive cruise control on, following a car, and going downhill, I don't think there is a need to use the paddles for the regenerative breaking effect. Try using the Power Flow Meter screen and watch the energy flow from the wheels to the battery.
 

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Not the 47 Advertised!! :(

I have driven mine about 3000 miles. Each tank of gas has averaged from 39 to 41.5 mpg. I drive about 35% at 74 mph, 35% 64 mph, 15% various slow speeds, and 15% 79 mph. I have monitored the gas throughout various speeds through mostly flat roads and very hot and humid summer driving in rural Georgia.

For one stretch of road, when I was behind a truck doing 60 mph for 25 miles, I was getting 50 mpg. On the interstate doing 79 mph I seem to get about 35 mpg (not much better than a non-hybrid). I have used the paddles for braking since day one and I have gotten up to speed as slow as possible (except when oncoming cars make that impractical). I use cruise control most of the time.

The owners manual says that on the display that helps you drive more efficiently, the lines need to stay even. If they drop "backwards" that means your slowing too quickly. That may be some of my problem as in order to re-generate braking with paddles and keep the line on the display even, one has to practically coast to a stop from long distances. That is not practical if anyone is behind you wondering why your slowing down for the stop sign 1/2 mile back...

On a positive note, the car seems to match my calculator near perfectly when calculating mileage. Half of the time it has been spot on and half the time the car thinks it gets 1/2 mpg less than my calculator. My wife's prius always tells us we get 2 or 3 mpg more than we really do---it cheats...

Finally, if I only drove between 55 and 60 the car would likely get the advertised 47 mpg. I don't understand how the car got that rating as I thought mileage was supposed to take real world driving conditions into account. The testers must have crawled up to speed and not gone over 60 mph.

I do plan to check with the dealer and see if maybe some computer setting isn't right or something.

Oh, and speaking of computer settings, I am also having the widely reported problem of the compass and navigation disappearing from the HUD and dash. Other than these two complaints, the car is incredibly awesome!!
 

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On the interstate doing 79 mph I seem to get about 35 mpg (not much better than a non-hybrid).

Finally, if I only drove between 55 and 60 the car would likely get the advertised 47 mpg. I don't understand how the car got that rating as I thought mileage was supposed to take real world driving conditions into account. The testers must have crawled up to speed and not gone over 60 mph.
Exactly. "Real world" testing is not 79 mph. A hybrid is not the right car for sustained high speed interstate travel.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
I have driven mine about 3000 miles. Each tank of gas has averaged from 39 to 41.5 mpg. I drive about 35% at 74 mph, 35% 64 mph, 15% various slow speeds, and 15% 79 mph. I have monitored the gas throughout various speeds through mostly flat roads and very hot and humid summer driving in rural Georgia.

For one stretch of road, when I was behind a truck doing 60 mph for 25 miles, I was getting 50 mpg. On the interstate doing 79 mph I seem to get about 35 mpg (not much better than a non-hybrid). I have used the paddles for braking since day one and I have gotten up to speed as slow as possible (except when oncoming cars make that impractical). I use cruise control most of the time.

....

Finally, if I only drove between 55 and 60 the car would likely get the advertised 47 mpg. I don't understand how the car got that rating as I thought mileage was supposed to take real world driving conditions into account. The testers must have crawled up to speed and not gone over 60 mph.
From driving the 18 HAH, I find it much easier to get good mpg in city type driving. That seems amazing to me but I have adjusted my driving style to achieve it using tools the car offers for realtime feedback.

Seeing you're in Georgia, I have to believe you're using the a/c. That's takes a toll on mpg. The 2 or 3 mpg that might make on a 25mpg vehicle could be greater here because resources are more taxed at high speed in the HAH than say a v6 which can shut down some cylinders. This is the mpg star of most non-hybrids. We have a 70mph road up here where I'm near 80. With A/C bumped down to around 40. But, the car held it's own, still had some reserve power, and drove like a charm.

I've been reading more about this for other hybrids (so little written about these that I could find). The "crawl start" that may seem to be so great for hybrids in electric mode is not necessarily the best thing. It's a huge drag on EV resources. Getting to speed where the systems can work best has value but not overdoing it. That makes the screen with the lines to show over accel/ over decel to be misleading.

Still learning here, right along with you Sean!:smile
 

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Over 3300 miles so far, I'm getting 46mpg on average, with a high of 48 and a low of 42.
42-43 seems about what I'm getting at 75mph.
Currently my commute has a lot of construction so I'm either 55-60mph on the interstate or the back road for about 75% of my high speed travel. One day I'll fill up on a Monday to see what I'm really getting, but car says 51-52mpg for my commute(probably about right).
Will be doing some more mountainous travel in the near future, will bet interested to see how it goes.
While I miss my old manual v6 at times, I am happy to be getting about 2x the mpg. Enough fuel cost savings that is like having 9 car payments a year instead of 12 :)
 

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From driving the 18 HAH, I find it much easier to get good mpg in city type driving. That seems amazing to me but I have adjusted my driving style to achieve it using tools the car offers for realtime feedback.
The more stop-and-go city driving you do, the more energy goes back into the battery from regenerative braking and the better your gas mileage should be.

At least that's the way it was in my '04 Prius and I assume it's the same for the Accord Hybrid.

I've had my '18 Touring model for a grand total of eight hours, so I haven't even started to pay attention to the MPG yet. I'm still learning all the tech.
 

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I've had my '18 Touring model for a grand total of eight hours, so I haven't even started to pay attention to the MPG yet. I'm still learning all the tech.
For now, I'm dialed in to the Eco Drive (lines) on the main display and the Power Flow on the Display Audio screen. As you've had a great deal more experience in driving hybrids, I'd be interested in hearing which of the options you're using.
 

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Sundayt
Congratulations! Send us a picture of your beauty.
Posted one in the Gallery this morning--more to follow.

For now, I'm dialed in to the Eco Drive (lines) on the main display and the Power Flow on the Display Audio screen. As you've had a great deal more experience in driving hybrids, I'd be interested in hearing which of the options you're using.
Amikek,

I haven't played around with the Eco Drive screen yet, but when I read about it in the Owner's Manual I immediately thought it would be very useful in maximizing my driving efficiency. Same with the Power Flow on the main screen. I'm still in the process of setting radio stations and customizing every possible tech option, but I suspect I'll use the Power Flow screen a lot. That's what I always had on in my Prius.

I think the secret to driving any hybrid is just to be as smooth and gentle as possible on the accelerator and brake. I read somewhere that you should pretend there's an egg between your right foot and the accelerator pedal, and you should try to operate the pedal without breaking the imaginary egg.

I'm not by any means that fanatical about it, but I do try to use the least accelerator pressure that I can get away with. The beauty of a hybrid is that you can drive it just like a regular car and still get good MPG, or you can consciously interact with the unique features of the power train and get even better MPG. It's a win-win situation, IMO.
 

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That's it exactly but I'll see your accelerator egg and raise you a brake pedal egg.
 

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That's it exactly but I'll see your accelerator egg and raise you a brake pedal egg.
Yeah, that too!

And don't forget to use the variable regenerative braking levers.
 

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Can someone dumb this down for me? In what scenarios would I use the paddles and how does that save gas?

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