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Depends how you drive. I did my first at 2000 and then every 3000 after.
If you are buying American produced oil you are feeding American families. Keep up the good work! Otherwise consider extending your intervals to at least 5 k? I will admit the 7-8k MM intervals make me uncomfortable...But I'm not an engineer. I don't believe Honda is intentionally recommending damaging their engines even if it goes against my petroleum industry brainwashing of 3k oil intervals. I change at 20% Or whenever feels good. Can't change it too much I don't think, but why crawl under the car to waste money?
 

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Corvalis TTX
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5,580 Posts
Depends how you drive. I did my first at 2000 and then every 3000 after.

The saying "fools and their money are soon parted" somehow comes to mind when reading your post. I'm wondering why you're choosing 3000 as your interval. Do you know something that Honda engineers have missed?

If you are buying American produced oil you are feeding American families. Keep up the good work! Otherwise consider extending your intervals to at least 5 k? I will admit the 7-8k MM intervals make me uncomfortable...But I'm not an engineer. I don't believe Honda is intentionally recommending damaging their engines even if it goes against my petroleum industry brainwashing of 3k oil intervals. I change at 20% Or whenever feels good. Can't change it too much I don't think, but why crawl under the car to waste money?
There is a school of thought in the engineering community that says a fresh oil filter doesn't filter as well as a used filter. If true then changing the filter too frequently may not be a good thing and may be why Honda recommends a filter change with every other oil change.
 

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The man asked, I answered with what I do. No need to call names. If you want to discuss theory then present your hypothesis and then support it with data. When you’re confident, have it peer reviewed.

3000 is a bit arbitrary, but it’s my personal approximation.

Missed, that’s a bit strong and not really how it works. Honda’s engineers design around their assumptions and constraints. How you drive is one of those assumptions, in my opinion a very large one. Due to my personal driving style I have offset the oil change interval to mitigate the hypothesized increase in wear.

It’s just what I do. I have no data and this is not a peer reviewed journal. You’re also not my peer, unless you have a PhD hiding behind that rude comment. Do what you want, it’s your car. It’s all just for fun!
 

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The man asked, I answered with what I do. No need to call names. If you want to discuss theory then present your hypothesis and then support it with data. When you’re confident, have it peer reviewed.

3000 is a bit arbitrary, but it’s my personal approximation.

Missed, that’s a bit strong and not really how it works. Honda’s engineers design around their assumptions and constraints. How you drive is one of those assumptions, in my opinion a very large one. Due to my personal driving style I have offset the oil change interval to mitigate the hypothesized increase in wear.

It’s just what I do. I have no data and this is not a peer reviewed journal. You’re also not my peer, unless you have a PhD hiding behind that rude comment. Do what you want, it’s your car. It’s all just for fun!
Most PhDs I've met are complete imbeciles. They argue theoretical points and have no understanding of reality. I usually just fire them on the first day I take over....right about when they start telling me how smart they are. I have them escorted out the door, so that they will never forget that they are not my peer.

You signed up to a forum to make a comment such as "Depends how you drive. I did my first at 2000 and then every 3000 after." No explanation, no information. You want to troll? Find another forum.
 

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Corvalis TTX
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The man asked, I answered with what I do. No need to call names. If you want to discuss theory then present your hypothesis and then support it with data. When you’re confident, have it peer reviewed.

3000 is a bit arbitrary, but it’s my personal approximation.

Missed, that’s a bit strong and not really how it works. Honda’s engineers design around their assumptions and constraints. How you drive is one of those assumptions, in my opinion a very large one. Due to my personal driving style I have offset the oil change interval to mitigate the hypothesized increase in wear.

It’s just what I do. I have no data and this is not a peer reviewed journal. You’re also not my peer, unless you have a PhD hiding behind that rude comment. Do what you want, it’s your car. It’s all just for fun!

Given that Honda's mileage minder takes driving style and environmental conditions into account, and that you've decided you know better than Honda by declaring that based on your driving style you'll change oil at 3K, it's clear that you think Honda has missed something. It's also clear you really don't know how to express just what they missed.

3000 miles is really not arbitrary at all - I'm sure it made sense in the 1970s ;)

Also, I didn't call you any sort of a name at all - it's odd that you think I did.
 

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Exactly right. 3000 miles was the thing to do in the 70s and maybe even the 80s. Click and Clack used to promote that interval up until the 90's when they came out and started promoting 5000 mile intervals. Hell I do 10k now with synthetics.
 

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In August 2020, I bought a 2019 Accord with a manufacture date of MAR 2019. It had a little more than 1000 miles when I bought it and since then, I have only put on about 800 miles and the MM says 80%. Normally, I would follow the MM, but considering the circumstances, I am wondering if I should change the oil sooner since the car was obviously test driven to reach the 1000 miles, but also sat on the lot for the rest of the time, some of the time in freezing temperatures. I have called multiple Honda service departments, including the one I purchased the car from, but all they all have personal recommendations and no clear answers. Thoughts?
 

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I have a Pilot as a second vehicle and drive it less than 5k per year. As a result I have ALWAYS changed the oil oevery year despite what the MM indicates. I believe this is spelled out in the owners manual.

Maintenance Main Items

If a Maintenance Minder indicator does not appear more than 12 months after the display is reset, change the engine oil

every year.

NOTE: Adjust the valves during services A, B, 1, 2, or 3 if they are noisy.

Symbol Maintenance Main Items

A Replace engine oil

- Engine oil capacity without oil filter

1.5 L engine: 3.2 L (3.4 US qt)

2.0 L engine: 4.4 L (4.6 US qt)

B Replace engine oil and oil filter

- Engine oil capacity with oil filter

1.5 L engine: 3.5 L (3.7 US qt)

2.0 L engine: 4.8 L (5.1 US qt)

Inspect front and rear brakes

Check pads and discs for wear (thickness), damage, and cracks.

Check calipers for damage, leaks, and tightness of mounting bolts.

Check expiration date of the tire repair kit bottle (if equipped)

Inspect tie-rod ends, steering gearbox, and gearbox boots

Check steering linkage.

Check boots for damage and leaking grease.

Inspect suspension components

Check bolts for tightness.

Check condition of ball joint boots for deterioration and damage.

Inspect driveshaft boots

- Check boots for cracks and boot bands for tightness.

Inspect brake hoses and lines including VSA lines

- Check master cylinder and VSA modulator-control unit for damage and leakage.

Inspect all fluid levels and condition of fluids

Engine coolant

M/T fluid

CVT fluid

A/T fluid

Clutch fluid

Brake fluid

Windshield washer fluid

Inspect exhaust system

- Check catalytic converter heat shields, exhaust pipes, and muffler for damage, leaks, and tightness.

Inspect fuel lines and connections

- Check for loose connections, cracks, and deterioration; retighten loose connections and replace

damaged parts.

NOTE: According to state and federal regulations, failure to do the maintenance items marked with an asterisk ( ) will not

void the customer's emissions warranties. However, Honda recommends that all maintenance services be done at the

recommended interval, to ensure long-term reliability.
 

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2018 LX
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171 Posts
In August 2020, I bought a 2019 Accord with a manufacture date of MAR 2019. It had a little more than 1000 miles when I bought it and since then, I have only put on about 800 miles and the MM says 80%. Normally, I would follow the MM, but considering the circumstances, I am wondering if I should change the oil sooner since the car was obviously test driven to reach the 1000 miles, but also sat on the lot for the rest of the time, some of the time in freezing temperatures. I have called multiple Honda service departments, including the one I purchased the car from, but all they all have personal recommendations and no clear answers. Thoughts?
10th Gen Accords requires once a year oil change regardless of what the MM Says according to the Owners Manual. Not surprised your service department didn’t relay that info. I‘be driven Accords since 1987 and my 2018 LX is my third one. For some reason service departments don’t seem to know much about them.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Avid "Accord-ist"
2020 Accord EX-L 2.0T
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10 Posts
Just making this post to add another "data point" to the mix.

Local dealer where I bought the car (2020 EX-L 2.0T) offers "Free For Life" oil/filter changes to buyers. I never was able to get a definitive ruling over the phone on when I could bring the car in based on Maintenance Minder readings, as the service department seemed to suggest 20% remaining life. However this was never actually specified with any precision.

When the Maintenance Minder showed 20% a few days back (mileage 2360 after some 10 months ownership), I made an appointment online for the service. I know this seems quite low mileage, etc., but at these prices (i.e., free) it seemed worth the trouble. It was described as "Service B" which evidently means a few extra checks of system levels and wear. Somehow I got an appointment set for about 2 hours after I actually made it online.

Got out of my pajamas (remember that Covid thing?) and drove the 1.9 miles to the dealer and checked in. Next thing I notice is that a dealer employee gets into the car, starts it up, and then cannot seem to move it. I ask him to roll down the window and, based on my particular set of preferences and settings, tell him to (1) fasten the seat belt, (2) step on the brake, (3) put the car in reverse, and (4) tap the accelerator to automatically release the parking brake (my preferences require this specific sequence). He follows these instructions and moves the car to a work bay. I go into the customer lounger to wait, meanwhile wondering why a dealer employee cannot figure out how to put the car into reverse. Actually more than just wondering.

Net result was a free oil and filter change, levels and wear point checks, and an escape from the dealership with vehicle intact. Not exactly an exciting or informative story, but then sometimes I'm just not exciting or informative myself.

Regards all.
 

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2019 1.5T EXL. 20,500 current mileage. I change the oil myself every 5000 miles regardless of the MM. The last two oil changes the MM has been @ 40% oil life left. Being that it is a small turbo charged DI engine I do 5000 mile OCI and don't give it anymore thought than that.
 

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2020 Accord Sport 2.0T
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27 Posts
I bought my car in August this year, I now have 2500 miles on it. My maintenance minder still shows 90% oil life remaining. I know it mainly decreases in 10% intervals according to the user manual so maybe it will change to 80% soon, but at this rate it seems like I will have to go around 10-12K before it is "due" for service with the original oil from the factory. I'll probably get it changed before it reaches due time at this rate... Thoughts? Wonder if my MM is stuck. Been at 90% for EVER.
 

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I bought my car in August this year, I now have 2500 miles on it. My maintenance minder still shows 90% oil life remaining. I know it mainly decreases in 10% intervals according to the user manual so maybe it will change to 80% soon, but at this rate it seems like I will have to go around 10-12K before it is "due" for service with the original oil from the factory. I'll probably get it changed before it reaches due time at this rate... Thoughts? Wonder if my MM is stuck. Been at 90% for EVER.
This is my general thought about oil changes.

Change every 5,000 miles or 6 months, whichever comes first. This is for the people who want very fresh oil in their cars all the time. It is a bit wasteful doing it like this since the oil is often still good to go for more miles.

Change every 7,500 miles or 6 months. Whichever comes first. This should be for the average driver.

Change every 10,000 miles or 1 year. Whichever comes first. This is for people who do not mind pushing their oil interval while knowing the oil they have in their car should still be protecting like Amsoil. Though many other oils can do same thing for 10,000 miles or 1 year, whichever comes first.

Anything above 10,000 miles before an oil change are for the very bold.

Any of these intervals should be good, except your oil life monitor asks you to do it before each of these intervals above. Then by all means go get it changed if you get a notification before any of the choices I listed above.
 

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I bought my car in August this year, I now have 2500 miles on it. My maintenance minder still shows 90% oil life remaining. I know it mainly decreases in 10% intervals according to the user manual so maybe it will change to 80% soon, but at this rate it seems like I will have to go around 10-12K before it is "due" for service with the original oil from the factory. I'll probably get it changed before it reaches due time at this rate... Thoughts? Wonder if my MM is stuck. Been at 90% for EVER.
Been at 90% for EVER? You bought your car 2 months ago and have put next to no miles on it. Why would you be anywhere near needing an oil change? The MM is not stuck, you just haven't driven your car.
 

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2020 Accord Sport 2.0T
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27 Posts
This is my general thought about oil changes.

Change every 5,000 miles or 6 months, whichever comes first. This is for the people who want very fresh oil in their cars all the time. It is a bit wasteful doing it like this since the oil is often still good to go for more miles.

Change every 7,500 miles or 6 months. Whichever comes first. This should be for the average driver.

Change every 10,000 miles or 1 year. Whichever comes first. This is for people who do not mind pushing their oil interval while knowing the oil they have in their car should still be protecting like Amsoil. Though many other oils can do same thing for 10,000 miles or 1 year, whichever comes first.

Anything above 10,000 miles before an oil change are for the very bold.

Any of these intervals should be good, except your oil life monitor asks you to do it before each of these intervals above. Then by all means go get it changed if you get a notification before any of the choices I listed above.
Thanks, I appreciate it and I agree.

Been at 90% for EVER? You bought your car 2 months ago and have put next to no miles on it. Why would you be anywhere near needing an oil change? The MM is not stuck, you just haven't driven your car.
True, thanks Grumpy :). I'm not used to tech in a car so maybe I'm too OCD about it. Will update when it changes, if it ever does :)
 

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Follow the intervals set by Honda and send the oil to a testing center. It will come back within limits and also with the note saying the oil can be used longer.
 

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2018 LX
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171 Posts
Just making this post to add another "data point" to the mix.

Local dealer where I bought the car (2020 EX-L 2.0T) offers "Free For Life" oil/filter changes to buyers. I never was able to get a definitive ruling over the phone on when I could bring the car in based on Maintenance Minder readings, as the service department seemed to suggest 20% remaining life. However this was never actually specified with any precision.

When the Maintenance Minder showed 20% a few days back (mileage 2360 after some 10 months ownership), I made an appointment online for the service. I know this seems quite low mileage, etc., but at these prices (i.e., free) it seemed worth the trouble. It was described as "Service B" which evidently means a few extra checks of system levels and wear. Somehow I got an appointment set for about 2 hours after I actually made it online.

Got out of my pajamas (remember that Covid thing?) and drove the 1.9 miles to the dealer and checked in. Next thing I notice is that a dealer employee gets into the car, starts it up, and then cannot seem to move it. I ask him to roll down the window and, based on my particular set of preferences and settings, tell him to (1) fasten the seat belt, (2) step on the brake, (3) put the car in reverse, and (4) tap the accelerator to automatically release the parking brake (my preferences require this specific sequence). He follows these instructions and moves the car to a work bay. I go into the customer lounger to wait, meanwhile wondering why a dealer employee cannot figure out how to put the car into reverse. Actually more than just wondering.

Net result was a free oil and filter change, levels and wear point checks, and an escape from the dealership with vehicle intact. Not exactly an exciting or informative story, but then sometimes I'm just not exciting or informative myself.

Regards all.
My experience with My Honda dealership oil changes are the person doing the work is just a guy off the street, not a certified Honda technician. Three times my car was overfilled with oil. Started taking my car to a smaller dealership 40 minutes away.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Exacty ... I thought I was having oil dilution issues in my new 2019 1.5, but it was an overfill from a stealership oil change. I just do them myself now.
 

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2020 Accord Sport 2.0T
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27 Posts
I bought my car in August this year, I now have 2500 miles on it. My maintenance minder still shows 90% oil life remaining. I know it mainly decreases in 10% intervals according to the user manual so maybe it will change to 80% soon, but at this rate it seems like I will have to go around 10-12K before it is "due" for service with the original oil from the factory. I'll probably get it changed before it reaches due time at this rate... Thoughts? Wonder if my MM is stuck. Been at 90% for EVER.
PS - my MM just changed to 80%, as a follow up :)
 
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