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I am trying to decide if I should get a hybrid or gas Accord. I've done some math and I am not seeing a huge saving with a hybrid. What are other advantages of buying a hybrid model other than the cost of gas? Would you buy a hybrid it does not save you much?
 

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That's kind of the situation an Accord shopper is in, in trying to decide between the 1.5T and the Hybrid. If most of your driving is highway driving, the mileage advantage of the Hybrid over the 1.5T can be pretty minimal. However, the price difference is not that big, either, and in the 1.5T vs Hybrid comparison, the Hybrid provides better acceleration.

In my own decision process, I was going to either get a 2.0T, or a Hybrid (either of which would be in Touring form). In that case, the comparison does become more of a better performance versus better mileage. (Both versions being priced fairly similarly.)

I also like the Hybrid's technology, as well as several other factors, such as the fact that the hybrid components (e.g. battery packs, electric motors, inverter, etc.) get warranteed in CA for 10 years / 150k miles. And the gas engine is pretty understressed. Not to mention that I expect really long brake pad life, due to most light braking being done via regenerative braking, rather than via the brake pads.
 

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The hybrid has a different power delivery feel when driving so you may or may not like that anyway. The hybrid is quicker than the 1.5T but slower than the 2.0T and is priced in the middle of those too. I assume that you're looking at the 1.5T as the gas savings isn't as much between that and the hybrid as it is with the 2.0T.

What trim level are you looking at? For for me I wanted a touring trim and in 2019 (and 2020) the options were either hybrid or 2.0T if you want the touring trim They dropped the 1.5T from touring in 2019. The 2.0T cost more and I liked how the hybrid drives (not for everyone) so I saved more than just gas money. Yeah, I could have gotten a 2018 1.5T in touring but the remaining inventory in my area didn't have the color combo I wanted and the dealers probably weren't discounting them enough anyway to buy last years model.

Hybrids are in smaller supply compared to non-hybrids - so if you are looking for a particular ext/int color combo and trim level and aren't flexible on that, then it would be harder to find your combo a hybrid compared to a non-hybrid. And if you found it, then it may only be at one or two dealers which could limit your negotations unless they trade inventory without upcharging you.
 

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No
 
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For me one factor was making some contribution to the planet. Cost diff is a. On issue for me.

What I like about the HAH is the 2.0L is NOT a direct injection design. I suspect DI cars will have issues over time...so far Toyota has a hybrid DI/PI design, and the Mazda forums haven’t reported any issues with their DI’s that have been out since 2012.
 

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As example, if I only drove 10,000 miles per year instead of 19,000? Or if gas was $2/ gallon instead of heading to $3? It would be the 2.0T then.
 

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Honestly you should just get what makes you happy. There is so much marketing BS about gas savings with electric and hybrid cars.

Some folks might get excited about saving a few hundred dollars a year on gas, but I was more interested in range. I would rather make fewer trips to the gas station if I can. The range of the last car I had was about 300-340 miles or so in city driving with short trips. So I set a requirement while shopping that my next car would have a city driving range of at least 400 miles. With the Accord hybrid, I haven't gotten less than 500 miles to a tank and have gotten over 600 miles twice. Being able to go the gas station less as often has been great.
 

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No

Keep it simple pays
And "K.I.S.S." is maybe the best non-mpg reason to buy the hybrid. It's simpler than the other options. No transmission, no turbo, no starter, no alternator, electric pumps and compressors, etc.
The only reason to not get it is if you don't like something that's different.
 

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Honestly you should just get what makes you happy. There is so much marketing BS about gas savings with electric and hybrid cars.

Some folks might get excited about saving a few hundred dollars a year on gas, but I was more interested in range. I would rather make fewer trips to the gas station if I can. The range of the last car I had was about 300-340 miles or so in city driving with short trips. So I set a requirement while shopping that my next car would have a city driving range of at least 400 miles. With the Accord hybrid, I haven't gotten less than 500 miles to a tank and have gotten over 600 miles twice. Being able to go the gas station less as often has been great.
Yes. One of the reasons I got the 9th gen is its 17 gallon fuel tank. A 12 gallon fuel tank may be acceptable on a compact, but if a midsize sedan can't get easy 500 highway miles (without making constant effort to conserve fuel and with enough left in the tank to keep the pump happy, not down to the last drop), it's a big dent in its utility.
 

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If I can't go to an auto parts store in 10 years and buy replacement batteries when they inevitably die, then no.

Yes. One of the reasons I got the 9th gen is its 17 gallon fuel tank. A 12 gallon fuel tank may be acceptable on a compact, but if a midsize sedan can't get easy 500 highway miles (without making constant effort to conserve fuel and with enough left in the tank to keep the pump happy, not down to the last drop), it's a big dent in its utility.
Running a modern car low on fuel will not kill the fuel pump. That's an old wive's tale. A lot of fuel pumps are mounted near the top of the tank, so even if that were true, fuel pumps would be failing if the tank wasn't constantly full to the top.
 

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If it's a plug-in hybrid or EV and I commute with a car in Vancouver, then yes! This is because they made the HOV lane legal to use for EV or plug-in hybrid even if you are the only occupant in the car. You can just blow past everyone then.

Otherwise if it's just purely a grocery getter/commuter then an EV is okay, but for something fun, an ICE car w/manual trans is a must.

That said, the 8th Gen hybrid Civic left a bitter taste in their owners' mouth for sure.

If I can't go to an auto parts store in 10 years and buy replacement batteries when they inevitably die, then no.
IIRC Chrisfix has a video for replacing the batteries in older Prius so it's definitely possible.

Battery tech definitely still have some way to go, though.



Sent from GM1917. Technology!
 

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If I can't go to an auto parts store in 10 years and buy replacement batteries when they inevitably die, then no.


Running a modern car low on fuel will not kill the fuel pump. That's an old wive's tale. A lot of fuel pumps are mounted near the top of the tank, so even if that were true, fuel pumps would be failing if the tank wasn't constantly full to the top.
I don't know if you'll be able to buy a replacement battery pack at a generic auto parts store, but MAYBE from an online vendor of genuine Honda (OEM) parts. The issue will probably be shipping restrictions based on Li-ion battery packs....

A dealer that also sells online (at discounted prices) might be the best bet at that time, if it is local enough to pick up at the dealer.

It's also true that the procedure for safe replacement might be involved enough that Honda might refuse to sell just that part....

The battery packs in Accord Hybrids is not all that large, and I don't think they will be ridiculously expensive. Roughly a tenth the size of the Clarity's battery pack (or maybe it's an eighth....), and only a 50th the size (or less) of full-electric EVs.

The other thing is that range loss as the battery pack ages is not as noticeable with a regular hybrid, as it is with a full-electric EV, or even a plug-in hybrid. It's less of a "linear" loss of range, as maximum charge is only made use of under some circumstances....

It's true enough that some/many repairs on a hybrid may well be less doable by do-it-yourselfers. Which is part of the justification for the longer warranty period for hybrid-related components. Time will tell..... Certainly the longevity record for Toyota Priuses has been very good, although they use NiMH batteries, and not Li-ion.
 

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I sold my Prius after 8 years, 80k miles to a colleague for their kid. They used it for 4-5 years at less than 10k miles a year before it threw a code saying the battery should be replaced. They opted to replace it for about $3k at the dealer.

As more and more of these battery replacements come up, more options for replacements outside of the dealer will be available. However, I would still think twice before dropping $2-3k in a car that old.
 

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No.

Regarding the EV related comments above, living in Canada, I would never opt for a fuel over which the government has a monopoly, no way. (here in Canada, electricity is doled out ONLY by govt...yikes).
 

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I'd like to skip the hybrid all together and go for an all electric when the battery technology reaches a level where recharging is no more of an inconvenience than refilling a tank with dino juice. There are a ton of big brains working on new batteries with greater capacity, quicker recharge and better longevity. Electric motor is the ideal motor for wheeled ground transportation; it has torque at 0rpm when you need it the most, you don't need a clutch, it can start from 0 and go all the way up to 20-30K rpm so you don't need a gearbox. I'm honestly looking forward to having one. Just not today.
 

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I would still buy one. I think the future in cars is electric power and am happy to support getting there. Anything that improves the energy efficiency of a gas engine is also a worthy goal to me. I am pleased to know I am helping to reduce the amount of harmful emissions whenever I drive it vs driving a standard gas engine car.

I love the way my Hybrid runs, and am very happy I bought it. My Wife is probably going to get a CRV hybrid this year.

- Jack
 

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I would still buy one. I think the future in cars is electric power and am happy to support getting there. Anything that improves the energy efficiency of a gas engine is also a worthy goal to me. I am pleased to know I am helping to reduce the amount of harmful emissions whenever I drive it vs driving a standard gas engine car.

I love the way my Hybrid runs, and am very happy I bought it. My Wife is probably going to get a CRV hybrid this year.

- Jack
Manufacturing of batteries is very polluting, though.

With EV, it depends a lot on how your power is generated and there are some good analysis on them, but on a hybrid without plug-in, I would be curious to see how long it takes to offset the pollution caused by the battery manufacturing. Granted, the battery is smaller, but it's still being charged by the ICE and all the maintenance associated with the ICE still needs to be performed.

I'd like to skip the hybrid all together and go for an all electric when the battery technology reaches a level where recharging is no more of an inconvenience than refilling a tank with dino juice. There are a ton of big brains working on new batteries with greater capacity, quicker recharge and better longevity. Electric motor is the ideal motor for wheeled ground transportation; it has torque at 0rpm when you need it the most, you don't need a clutch, it can start from 0 and go all the way up to 20-30K rpm so you don't need a gearbox. I'm honestly looking forward to having one. Just not today.
All well said, but EM can still benefit from a gearbox - EVs tend to be less efficient on highways.

I believe ZF is making a 2AT designed for EVs for this exact reason.

No.

Regarding the EV related comments above, living in Canada, I would never opt for a fuel over which the government has a monopoly, no way. (here in Canada, electricity is doled out ONLY by govt...yikes).
Oligopoly isn't better than monopoly, really.

And in Canada, you would have better reasons to not use an EV outside of West Coast, as the cold significantly impacts the range.

Also, there is no way any EV will be able to make it from Fort Mac to Edmonton on one charge right now. Not good in an emergency.

Sent from GM1917. Technology!
 
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