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Where in the graph, would a car going about 70 mph would be? I would like to know how easy is to accelerate when going about 70 mph. I don't mind getting "lousy" MPG in the low 40's or high 30's. I like the HAH concept, high 40's mileage is not the top priority.
Where either is in that graph requires the gear ratio; the ICE car will down-shift to increase the rpms, but the HAH will disconnect the engine from the wheels entirely, to do a similar jump. I can't say where to - just that it can maintain 181 hp, and get momentary bursts of 212. The 1.5T can get above that, but only when it is between 5000 and 6200 rpm.

So the 181 is less than the 1.5T will be at, but the 212 is more. We don't know the exact conditions where that happens.

+++++
Here are some times from Car & Driver, for 1.5T (MT), 1.5T (CVT), 2.5T (AT), and HAH:
  • 0-60 mph: 7.2, 7.3, 5.7, 7.1 seconds
  • 5-60 (rolling start): 8.2, 8.0, 6.4, 7.8 seconds
  • 30-50 (top gear): 14.0, 4.0, 3.3, 3.9 seconds
  • 50-70 (top gear): 10.7, 5.2, 4.1, 5.8 seconds
The "top gear" test is an archaic one meant to compare 3-speed automatic transmissions. It is not fair to the manual transmission, since the others can't be stopped from shifting by themselves. And that particular one, starting from a cruise at 50 mph, can be about the worst for the design of the HAH. Cruising between about 50 mph and 65 mph is the range where it can be in any of three different modes:
  • EV Drive: The ICE is off, and only the battery is supplying electricity to the motor.
  • Engine Drive: The ICE is running at 1850 rpm (for 50 mph), and generating about 33 hp. The motor is acting as either a motor or a generator, adjusting the power being sent to the wheels to match what is required.
  • Hybrid Drive: The ICE is driving the generator, and the motor is propelling the car alone.
The 50-70 mph test will cause it to shift into Hybrid Drive if it wasn't there already. There will be a lag from Engoine Drive, and even more from EV Drive (to start the ICE). How long it takes will Also depend on what mode (NORMAL, ECON, or SPORT) the car is in. I suspect (but don't know) that it is where the 212 hp comes in. The good news is that, for passing, or can goose the engine to put it is Hybrid Drive before you start the maneuver, which should bring the HAH closer to the 1.5T. If it is an unplanned acceleration, your reaction time is probably more important than the difference.

So yes, accelerations above about 50 mph are the one place where the hybrid's performance may not surpass the 1.5T. But it isn't bad; and if that is what you need, the 2.0T is probably the correct choice.
 

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Where either is in that graph requires the gear ratio; the ICE car will down-shift to increase the rpms, but the HAH will disconnect the engine from the wheels entirely, to do a similar jump. I can't say where to - just that it can maintain 181 hp, and get momentary bursts of 212. The 1.5T can get above that, but only when it is between 5000 and 6200 rpm.

So the 181 is less than the 1.5T will be at, but the 212 is more. We don't know the exact conditions where that happens.

+++++
Here are some times from Car & Driver, for 1.5T (MT), 1.5T (CVT), 2.5T (AT), and HAH:
  • 0-60 mph: 7.2, 7.3, 5.7, 7.1 seconds
  • 5-60 (rolling start): 8.2, 8.0, 6.4, 7.8 seconds
  • 30-50 (top gear): 14.0, 4.0, 3.3, 3.9 seconds
  • 50-70 (top gear): 10.7, 5.2, 4.1, 5.8 seconds
The "top gear" test is an archaic one meant to compare 3-speed automatic transmissions. It is not fair to the manual transmission, since the others can't be stopped from shifting by themselves. And that particular one, starting from a cruise at 50 mph, can be about the worst for the design of the HAH. Cruising between about 50 mph and 65 mph is the range where it can be in any of three different modes:
  • EV Drive: The ICE is off, and only the battery is supplying electricity to the motor.
  • Engine Drive: The ICE is running at 1850 rpm (for 50 mph), and generating about 33 hp. The motor is acting as either a motor or a generator, adjusting the power being sent to the wheels to match what is required.
  • Hybrid Drive: The ICE is driving the generator, and the motor is propelling the car alone.
The 50-70 mph test will cause it to shift into Hybrid Drive if it wasn't there already. There will be a lag from Engoine Drive, and even more from EV Drive (to start the ICE). How long it takes will Also depend on what mode (NORMAL, ECON, or SPORT) the car is in. I suspect (but don't know) that it is where the 212 hp comes in. The good news is that, for passing, or can goose the engine to put it is Hybrid Drive before you start the maneuver, which should bring the HAH closer to the 1.5T. If it is an unplanned acceleration, your reaction time is probably more important than the difference.

So yes, accelerations above about 50 mph are the one place where the hybrid's performance may not surpass the 1.5T. But it isn't bad; and if that is what you need, the 2.0T is probably the correct choice.
Thanks for the detailed explanation & data As long as I know what I need to do, it should not be a problem. I was just wondering what to expect when going on interstate trips. Maybe switching to Sport mode before starting the maneuver might help.The 2.0T is very nice, but "beast mode" is not free. Honda took the 1.5T out of the equation with the Touring model. I did not have any problems passing with the old 85 Accord (automatic) & 135hp.
 

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I have been using the Auto start for at least a couple min in the morning but yes it warms up quickly. The ice engine starts at a higher rpm like most cars to warmup when I turn the heat on in the morning. Was getting ~52 mpg give or take in 30- 40 deg weather. Def not as cold as some people see but that's all I get here lol.
I was happy to get rid of my manual for this car. I went to the dealership and that's what they had there. It is a very high volume dealership and it was the end of the year. My car is a 20. For them it's worth it to just turn the vehicle especially since they probably had not even paid their financing on the vehicle yet(since they had not had the vehicle that long) and they already sold it and can get another from their allocation. It's also good to go into the dealership in a position of strength. There is ALWAYS a dealership willing to deal. If you go in with another offer from a different dealership, even out of state, they have less choice of they want to sell a car. I have flown out of state before and bought the car and drove it back. I rarely find a dealership that will let the sale go if your being realistic. In this case I almost walked over the stupid spare tire kit I made them throw into the deal, on top of the discount already negotaited. They were not going to let the deal go for what amounts to less than a couple hundred parts it costs them.


Maybe because everyone keeps acting like it's a mortal sin that he had not previously considered one. He said he's curious now after my comments and wants to test drive one, yet everyone keeps ignoring that quote.
It's like those people on the Vegas strip or any other tourist trap where they keep trying to give you those flyers and change your mind. YOU! YOU TAKE HYRBID NOW! HYRBID IS BETTER THAT'S WHAT YOU REALLY WANT! Let them go drive it.
Edit:
Also of note that EVERY other hyrbrid model in the Accord price range is a dog! No other manufacturers hyrbrid has the performance of the Accord. If the Accord had the performance of the Camry, I would have gotten a 1.5 Sport or the used 2.0t I looked at. But the 1.5 Accord is as slow as some of those other hyrbrids you say. Not after a chip and downpipe it's not. I personally will sacrifice some performance, to a certain extent. The HAH is basically the exception in a vehicle under 40k.
The HAH is a terrific vehicle. During the test drive I was astounded at just how well it drove. I’d never driven a hybrid before, and I had some preconceived notions that the driving experience would be abnormal somehow. So I was very pleasantly surprised. Nevertheless I totally get why it’s not the right car for everyone. The powertrain does make some weird noises at times that are less than pleasant, and if you like a throaty growl from the engine under rapid acceleration, as opposed to drone or whine, you could be disappointed. Yet for every demerit that can be ascribed to the vehicle, I can point to another two or three characteristics that more than offset the demerits. The car rides beautifully. It has a generally quiet demeanor. Acceleration comes on strong with even a gentle stab at the gas. Braking and handling is excellent, simply belying the fact it’s shod with economy minded tires. And the car delivers on its fuel efficiency promise; I’m averaging 48 mpg after about 9800 miles. That’s astounding by any measure, particularly for such a large and comfortable car. Fact is all cars present a set of attributes that are both positive and negative. No doubt that the negatives here are compelling nonstarters for some, and that’s totally understandable. In my scenario I’ve come to appreciate my HAH more every day. I find myself looking for excuses to take her for a spin, and I love that I can achieve great mpg without really trying.
 

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Braking and handling is excellent, simply belying the fact it’s shod with economy minded tires.
Even with the energy saver meats it puts down 0.83g on the skidpad... that's pretty much the same as the Pontiac G8 GT I traded in for it and that rode on 245 three-season rubber.

I tested all three power train choices - the 2.0t is super quick, the 1.5t was a bit of a dog but not unusable - just had to wind it up all the time on all the hills I have to drive on... the hybrid simply came out on top as the best all-around choice for power/acceleration and fuel range. The more I drive it the more I like it.
 
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