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Where in the graph, would a car going about 70 mph would be? I would like to know how easy is to accelerate when going about 70 mph. I don't mind getting "lousy" MPG in the low 40's or high 30's. I like the HAH concept, high 40's mileage is not the top priority.
Where either is in that graph requires the gear ratio; the ICE car will down-shift to increase the rpms, but the HAH will disconnect the engine from the wheels entirely, to do a similar jump. I can't say where to - just that it can maintain 181 hp, and get momentary bursts of 212. The 1.5T can get above that, but only when it is between 5000 and 6200 rpm.

So the 181 is less than the 1.5T will be at, but the 212 is more. We don't know the exact conditions where that happens.

+++++
Here are some times from Car & Driver, for 1.5T (MT), 1.5T (CVT), 2.5T (AT), and HAH:
  • 0-60 mph: 7.2, 7.3, 5.7, 7.1 seconds
  • 5-60 (rolling start): 8.2, 8.0, 6.4, 7.8 seconds
  • 30-50 (top gear): 14.0, 4.0, 3.3, 3.9 seconds
  • 50-70 (top gear): 10.7, 5.2, 4.1, 5.8 seconds
The "top gear" test is an archaic one meant to compare 3-speed automatic transmissions. It is not fair to the manual transmission, since the others can't be stopped from shifting by themselves. And that particular one, starting from a cruise at 50 mph, can be about the worst for the design of the HAH. Cruising between about 50 mph and 65 mph is the range where it can be in any of three different modes:
  • EV Drive: The ICE is off, and only the battery is supplying electricity to the motor.
  • Engine Drive: The ICE is running at 1850 rpm (for 50 mph), and generating about 33 hp. The motor is acting as either a motor or a generator, adjusting the power being sent to the wheels to match what is required.
  • Hybrid Drive: The ICE is driving the generator, and the motor is propelling the car alone.
The 50-70 mph test will cause it to shift into Hybrid Drive if it wasn't there already. There will be a lag from Engoine Drive, and even more from EV Drive (to start the ICE). How long it takes will Also depend on what mode (NORMAL, ECON, or SPORT) the car is in. I suspect (but don't know) that it is where the 212 hp comes in. The good news is that, for passing, or can goose the engine to put it is Hybrid Drive before you start the maneuver, which should bring the HAH closer to the 1.5T. If it is an unplanned acceleration, your reaction time is probably more important than the difference.

So yes, accelerations above about 50 mph are the one place where the hybrid's performance may not surpass the 1.5T. But it isn't bad; and if that is what you need, the 2.0T is probably the correct choice.
 

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Where either is in that graph requires the gear ratio; the ICE car will down-shift to increase the rpms, but the HAH will disconnect the engine from the wheels entirely, to do a similar jump. I can't say where to - just that it can maintain 181 hp, and get momentary bursts of 212. The 1.5T can get above that, but only when it is between 5000 and 6200 rpm.

So the 181 is less than the 1.5T will be at, but the 212 is more. We don't know the exact conditions where that happens.

+++++
Here are some times from Car & Driver, for 1.5T (MT), 1.5T (CVT), 2.5T (AT), and HAH:
  • 0-60 mph: 7.2, 7.3, 5.7, 7.1 seconds
  • 5-60 (rolling start): 8.2, 8.0, 6.4, 7.8 seconds
  • 30-50 (top gear): 14.0, 4.0, 3.3, 3.9 seconds
  • 50-70 (top gear): 10.7, 5.2, 4.1, 5.8 seconds
The "top gear" test is an archaic one meant to compare 3-speed automatic transmissions. It is not fair to the manual transmission, since the others can't be stopped from shifting by themselves. And that particular one, starting from a cruise at 50 mph, can be about the worst for the design of the HAH. Cruising between about 50 mph and 65 mph is the range where it can be in any of three different modes:
  • EV Drive: The ICE is off, and only the battery is supplying electricity to the motor.
  • Engine Drive: The ICE is running at 1850 rpm (for 50 mph), and generating about 33 hp. The motor is acting as either a motor or a generator, adjusting the power being sent to the wheels to match what is required.
  • Hybrid Drive: The ICE is driving the generator, and the motor is propelling the car alone.
The 50-70 mph test will cause it to shift into Hybrid Drive if it wasn't there already. There will be a lag from Engoine Drive, and even more from EV Drive (to start the ICE). How long it takes will Also depend on what mode (NORMAL, ECON, or SPORT) the car is in. I suspect (but don't know) that it is where the 212 hp comes in. The good news is that, for passing, or can goose the engine to put it is Hybrid Drive before you start the maneuver, which should bring the HAH closer to the 1.5T. If it is an unplanned acceleration, your reaction time is probably more important than the difference.

So yes, accelerations above about 50 mph are the one place where the hybrid's performance may not surpass the 1.5T. But it isn't bad; and if that is what you need, the 2.0T is probably the correct choice.
Thanks for the detailed explanation & data As long as I know what I need to do, it should not be a problem. I was just wondering what to expect when going on interstate trips. Maybe switching to Sport mode before starting the maneuver might help.The 2.0T is very nice, but "beast mode" is not free. Honda took the 1.5T out of the equation with the Touring model. I did not have any problems passing with the old 85 Accord (automatic) & 135hp.
 

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I have been using the Auto start for at least a couple min in the morning but yes it warms up quickly. The ice engine starts at a higher rpm like most cars to warmup when I turn the heat on in the morning. Was getting ~52 mpg give or take in 30- 40 deg weather. Def not as cold as some people see but that's all I get here lol.
I was happy to get rid of my manual for this car. I went to the dealership and that's what they had there. It is a very high volume dealership and it was the end of the year. My car is a 20. For them it's worth it to just turn the vehicle especially since they probably had not even paid their financing on the vehicle yet(since they had not had the vehicle that long) and they already sold it and can get another from their allocation. It's also good to go into the dealership in a position of strength. There is ALWAYS a dealership willing to deal. If you go in with another offer from a different dealership, even out of state, they have less choice of they want to sell a car. I have flown out of state before and bought the car and drove it back. I rarely find a dealership that will let the sale go if your being realistic. In this case I almost walked over the stupid spare tire kit I made them throw into the deal, on top of the discount already negotaited. They were not going to let the deal go for what amounts to less than a couple hundred parts it costs them.


Maybe because everyone keeps acting like it's a mortal sin that he had not previously considered one. He said he's curious now after my comments and wants to test drive one, yet everyone keeps ignoring that quote.
It's like those people on the Vegas strip or any other tourist trap where they keep trying to give you those flyers and change your mind. YOU! YOU TAKE HYRBID NOW! HYRBID IS BETTER THAT'S WHAT YOU REALLY WANT! Let them go drive it.
Edit:
Also of note that EVERY other hyrbrid model in the Accord price range is a dog! No other manufacturers hyrbrid has the performance of the Accord. If the Accord had the performance of the Camry, I would have gotten a 1.5 Sport or the used 2.0t I looked at. But the 1.5 Accord is as slow as some of those other hyrbrids you say. Not after a chip and downpipe it's not. I personally will sacrifice some performance, to a certain extent. The HAH is basically the exception in a vehicle under 40k.
The HAH is a terrific vehicle. During the test drive I was astounded at just how well it drove. I’d never driven a hybrid before, and I had some preconceived notions that the driving experience would be abnormal somehow. So I was very pleasantly surprised. Nevertheless I totally get why it’s not the right car for everyone. The powertrain does make some weird noises at times that are less than pleasant, and if you like a throaty growl from the engine under rapid acceleration, as opposed to drone or whine, you could be disappointed. Yet for every demerit that can be ascribed to the vehicle, I can point to another two or three characteristics that more than offset the demerits. The car rides beautifully. It has a generally quiet demeanor. Acceleration comes on strong with even a gentle stab at the gas. Braking and handling is excellent, simply belying the fact it’s shod with economy minded tires. And the car delivers on its fuel efficiency promise; I’m averaging 48 mpg after about 9800 miles. That’s astounding by any measure, particularly for such a large and comfortable car. Fact is all cars present a set of attributes that are both positive and negative. No doubt that the negatives here are compelling nonstarters for some, and that’s totally understandable. In my scenario I’ve come to appreciate my HAH more every day. I find myself looking for excuses to take her for a spin, and I love that I can achieve great mpg without really trying.
 

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Braking and handling is excellent, simply belying the fact it’s shod with economy minded tires.
Even with the energy saver meats it puts down 0.83g on the skidpad... that's pretty much the same as the Pontiac G8 GT I traded in for it and that rode on 245 three-season rubber.

I tested all three power train choices - the 2.0t is super quick, the 1.5t was a bit of a dog but not unusable - just had to wind it up all the time on all the hills I have to drive on... the hybrid simply came out on top as the best all-around choice for power/acceleration and fuel range. The more I drive it the more I like it.
 

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Yes. I went from a 2013 Fusion 2.5 that I love and has more comfortable knee space for my height but my dad wanted it and bought it from me. I had the opportunity and budget to buy a used 2018 Accord. The hybrid seemed techy and fast for almost 50 mpg and stood out. I drive 100 miles a day, 90 of which is on the freeway at 75-80. I love messing with the extra screens like the fusion has and the hybrid is loaded with them. I plan to run it to 160-190k over 5-6 years but I’ll see how the tech holds up while many see how the 1.5 holds up to the same. I didn’t buy it to save money. It actually increased my daily running cost by about $8 including insurance, gas, payment, tires, oil, ect... but any other model would have done the same. I didn’t buy it to be eco friendly over an LX, it’s faster and gets better mpg, and in the used market, it seemed to be less than $1000 difference in price if at all. Just one opinion.
 

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I would not. Those battery systems are way too much when they go out and I typically keep my cars a very long time. TBH, id much rather have to do a timing belt kit on V6 versus replacing a battery pack on a hybrid. To me, with fuel at 1.99/gal a hybrid is totally out of the question, unless I can get one for next to nothing.
 

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I like how quiet but was putting around and the batteries torque. Reminds me of the tuned f150 ecoboost I had, just a touch of the go pedal gives instant push forward/back. The mpg on town amazes me always 45-60 mpg. But I’ve taken a few long hwy trips where I run an entire tank of fuel at 77/78 mph and get 40-42 mpg all day with ac running. I don’t think any other accord will match that so with the added quiet and torque and minimal cost difference new - figured why not. Plus the tech makes this boring practical sedan a little more interesting.
 

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Yeah, even with very cheap gas I'd still go with the Hybrid. I'd be very tempted by the 2.0T, but I enjoy the hybrid's driving experience, and the combination of few compromises, and efficiency.

For prospective CR-V owners, I think it would be even more of a no-brainer, as in that case the hybrid is the best-performing option (with no 2.0T being offered). And since the CR-V hybrid uses the same mechanical AWD system as the regular CR-V (unlike the RAV4 hybrid which uses the electric motor as the rear wheel drive), the CR-V hybrid can also be viewed as "no compromises", with respect to the gas version.
 

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No I wouldn't, as long as gas prices are reasonable. I know that's not very green of me. It costs about the same to replace the battery as it does to overhaul a V6 engine.
 
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Here in CA, the hybrid's battery pack (as well as other "hybrid-specific" components) is warranted for 10 years and 150k miles, so in most cases, the cost of replacing the battery pack is not much of an issue. And the minimum warranty in other states is 8 years and 100k miles.
 

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I am trying to decide if I should get a hybrid or gas Accord. I've done some math and I am not seeing a huge saving with a hybrid. What are other advantages of buying a hybrid model other than the cost of gas? Would you buy a hybrid it does not save you much?
Besides the gas mileage, here are some of the things you get on a Hybrid that you don't get on an LX.
  • 212 HP, 20 more than 1.5T
  • Larger sway bars front and rear, same as Sport and Touring
  • Larger front brakes, same as Sport and Touring
If I can't go to an auto parts store in 10 years and buy replacement batteries when they inevitably die, then no.
Replacement batteries are currently available pretty much everywhere, but they weigh about 200 pounds.
 

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Yes. I went from a 2013 Fusion 2.5 that I love
I went from a 2014 Fusion Hybrid to a 2019 Accord Touring Hybrid. I had nothing but trouble with the Fusion, including a new transmission at 40k miles. It was just not a durable car, with lots of things breaking or needing replacement. Even the cupholder tensioners all broke.

The Accord is a much better car with excellent, reliable technology. I wish it had wireless Apple CarPlay and I miss the seat memory switch controlling the mirrors as well as the seats, and the rear window switches not being automatic like the front, but those are minor gripes. Overall, the Accord is a better value than the Fusion and a far more durable car.
 

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I rented a Fusion hybrid and damn that thing was painfully slow. And the ridiculous tiny trunk. Otherwise, it drove nicely.
 

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I rented a Fusion hybrid and damn that thing was painfully slow. And the ridiculous tiny trunk. Otherwise, it drove nicely.
Lessee, according to Consumer Reports, 0 to 60 mph in ...
  • 2020 Toyota Prius, 10.3 seconds
  • 2020 Ford Fusion Hybrid, 8.3 seconds
  • 2020 Toyota Camry Hybrid, 7.8 seconds
  • 2020 Honda Accord Hybrid, 7.4 seconds (Motor Trend: 6.7 seconds)
And for further comparison:
  • 2017 Acura NSX, 3.1 seconds according to Motor Trend.
  • 2021 Koenigsegg Gemera, 1.9 seconds according to manufacturer
I'm not suggesting the last two are comparable to the first four. I'm saying don't judge the technology by one or two examples.
 

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Would you buy a hybrid if gas saving factor is not a priority?
Nope.

(fwiw, the wife drives a ES300h)
 

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Lessee, according to Consumer Reports, 0 to 60 mph in ...
  • 2020 Toyota Prius, 10.3 seconds
  • 2020 Ford Fusion Hybrid, 8.3 seconds
  • 2020 Toyota Camry Hybrid, 7.8 seconds
  • 2020 Honda Accord Hybrid, 7.4 seconds (Motor Trend: 6.7 seconds)
And for further comparison:
  • 2017 Acura NSX, 3.1 seconds according to Motor Trend.
  • 2021 Koenigsegg Gemera, 1.9 seconds according to manufacturer
I'm not suggesting the last two are comparable to the first four. I'm saying don't judge the technology by one or two examples.
The 2017 Fusion Hybrid I rented was for a highway trip and I found the passing power to be weak. It was definitely good off the line, however. The Accord is better, for sure. But I guess it's what you're used to.
 

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I get in the 400's per tank and that is with a V6. Hybrid not necessary. However, look at the RAV4 and RAV4 prime there you get better performance and better mileage and for the regular RAV4 at a small premium even at today's prices. If you look at the passing times with a RAV4 Prime, that looks like fun.
 

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I get in the 400's per tank and that is with a V6. Hybrid not necessary. However, look at the RAV4 and RAV4 prime there you get better performance and better mileage and for the regular RAV4 at a small premium even at today's prices. If you look at the passing times with a RAV4 Prime, that looks like fun.
And I get over 600 with a smaller tank and less maintenance.
 
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